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Publication #4H ASJ 20.9

4-H Livestock Judging: Activity 9, What's Your Score?1

Chad Carr, Justin Crosswhite, and Amanda Johnson2

Credits and Acknowledgements

4-H LIVESTOCK JUDGING was developed through a team effort with the Florida 4-H Youth Development Program, Department of Family, Youth and Community Sciences, and the Department of Animal Science, The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida.

This edition of the Livestock Judging curriculum package was created by Chad Carr, Assistant Professor; Justin Crosswhite, Graduate Assistant; and Amanda Johnson, Undergraduate Assistant, Department of Animal Sciences. Authors of previous editions include: Julie Sexton and Karen Strickland, former Project Assistants; Allen Stateler, former Graduate Assistant; Saundra TenBroeck, Associate Professor and Youth Livestock Extension Specialist, Department of Animal Sciences; Tim Marshall, Associate Professor, Department of Animal Sciences; and Deborah J. Glauer, Extension Youth Development Specialist and Animal Science Design Team Leader, Department of Family, Youth and Community Sciences.

Technical review and assistance for this edition was provided by members of the 4-H Life Skills Animal Science Action Team—Amanda Thein, Nassau County 4-H Agent; Chris DeCubelis, Gilchrist County 4-H Agent; and Joy C. Jordan, Associate Professor 4-H Youth Development Curriculum Specialist, Department of Family, Youth and Community Sciences, University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences.

Activity 9

What's Your Score?

Background Basics

The scoring system used in the judging portion of most livestock judging events involves the use of cuts (subtractions) from a perfect score of 50. Cuts have point values assigned to them and indicate the differences in the livestock. There are three cuts in each class, with one assigned to each pair. The total cuts can be no more than 15. Leaders and officials learn how to assess a cut's value through experience and practice. The list below describes situations in which a cut would be determined:

CUT : DESCRIPTION OF PAIRS

1 point — The animals are very similar or their differences cancel each other out. A cut of 1 means the pair could be placed in either animal's favor.

2 points—The animals are alike, but one animal has slight advantages over the other. In most cases, this pair would be classified as a logical switch.

3 points— The animals are of similar quality, but one animal has clear advantages.

4 points—The animals aren't of similar quality and one animal has clear advantages over the other. The pair is an obvious placing.

5 points— One animal is clearly more outstanding than the other. The placing is obvious after only a short observation.

6 points— The animals are not even comparable.

7 points—The largest cut used, usually reflects a superior animal and an inferior animal.

After a correct placing and cuts have been established, points for each wrong placing are subtracted from the possible score of 50. A bust is a placing that involves more than one pair switch. In calculating a score, you must make six comparisons: Compare 1st to 2nd, 1st to 3rd, 1st to 4th, 2nd to 3rd, 2nd to 4th, and 3rd to 4th. Calculate the cut penalty of each pair and add them together for the final penalty; subtract this amount from 50.

Follow these examples to calculate individual scores.

EXAMPLE #1

OFFICIAL PLACING: 1 - 2 - 3 - 4

CUTS: 3 2 5

STUDENT'S PLACING: 3 - 2 - 1 - 4

Use the official placing to withdraw the proper pairs and cuts, and then determine point deductions based upon student’s placing.

Did you place 1/2? No, you lost 3 points

Did you place 1/3? No, you lost 3 + 2 = 5 points

Did you place 1/4? Yes, you lost no points

Did you place 2/3? No, you lost 2 points

Did you place2/4? Yes, you lost no points

Did you place 3/4? Yes, you lost no points.

Total deductions = 10 points

Score = (50—10) = 40

EXAMPLE #2

OFFICIAL PLACING: 4 - 3 - 1 - 2

CUTS: 3 4 2

STUDENT'S PLACING: 1 - 2 - 3 - 4

Did you place 4/3? No, you lost 3 points

Did you place 4/1? No, you lost 3 + 4 = 7 points

Did you place 4/2? No, you lost 3 + 4 + 2 = 9 points

Did you place 3/1? No, you lost 4 points

Did you place 3/2? No, you lost 4 + 2 = 6 points

Did you place 1/2? Yes, you lost no points.

Total deductions = 29 points

Score = (50—29) = 21

HORMEL scoring cards can also be used to score member's placings. These cards will give you all possible placing scores once an official placing and cuts have been entered. This scoring device is handy and is available from George A. Hormel Company, Box 800, Austin, MN 55912.

Oral reasons are scored in a different manner. Guidelines established in Activity 8 are the basis for scoring oral reasons (i.e. accuracy, terminology, delivery...) Judging team leaders or contest officials listen and watch for those aspects of an individual's oral reasons presentation and score them accordingly.

Introduction

While scores are a small part of the big picture and lesson of any judging competition, they are a method to reward success and practice. They can be easily calculated by any member. It is a simple process of subtracting points from a perfect score. This method is similar to grading done in schools, where 100 serves as perfect and points are lost through wrong answers on homework and tests. Through today's activity, you will learn a method to calculating your own and your team's scores.

DO Play Musical Chairs

  • Select four members to serve as animals in a judging class. Select one youth to play fast-paced music when a switch is underway.

  • Pin the numbers 1-4 on the front of the four members shirts and place four chairs at the front of the room. Have member one sit in chair #1, two in chair #2 and so on.

  • Assume this is the way that the group placed a class, 1-2-3-4. However, the official class placing was 1-4-2-3 and cuts were 4-2-5. The group has a bust.

  • Use the six step method, outlined in Background Basics, to score the class. Each time you correct a pair, the members must move into the correct position. For example, start at the beginning, placing 1 over 2, 3 or 4 was not an error, so no one moves and no cuts are required. Placing 2 over 3 is correct as well, no one moves. However, placing 2 over 4 is incorrect and causes the 2 to swap places with the 4, (music), and deducts a two point penalty. Finally, placing 3 over 2 is incorrect, the youth should swap places, (music), and deduct 5 points. The final score is then 43 points.

  • Once everyone is in the right place and a final score has been tabulated, choose four more members and repeat the game with the group seated as 3-2-4-1 and an official placing of 1-2-4-3 and cuts of 4-3-4.

  • This game will work for simple switches and busts. However, for more complex busts, taking members out of place before comparing to all of the others, will lead to fewer deductions than is actually warranted.

Reflect

  • What is an official cut?

The number of points subtracted from the perfect score of 50, when the animals are placed incorrectly

  • Do you think you could score your own placings now?

  • Why are some cuts larger than others?

The decisions to place one animal over another varies in difficulty, relative to the animal’s value.

  • What is the six-step scoring method?

Outlined in Background Basics

  • What is the maximum that the 3 cuts can equal?

15 points

DO What's Your Score

  • Have members figure the placing scores of the judging cards on the WHAT'S YOUR SCORE? Activity Sheet.

Reflect

  • Were the scores easy to calculate?

  • Did John, Jamar, Maria, or Angela have the highest score?

Jamar

  • Did everyone get the right scores? If not where did you go wrong?

Apply

At your next judging practice with live animals classes, divide the members up and assign them a class. On their assigned class, have them develop an official placing and cuts. They should be prepared to discuss why they selected the pairs and cuts.

What's Your Score?

John placed a market hog class 2-3-1-4

The official placing was 3-2-4-1

The official cuts were 3-2-5

John's score:_________

Jamar placed a Limousin bull class 4-2-1-3

The official placing was 4-2-3-1

The official cuts were 4-1-3

Maria placed a gilt class 3-4-1-2

The official placing was 3-2-4-1

The official cuts were 5-2-4

Angela placed a market lamb class 1-3-2-4

The official placing was 4-2-3-1

The official cuts were 4-3-2

Angela's score:_________

What's Your Score? - Key

SCENARIO 1 - John simply has a top and bottom switch. He loses 3 points for placing 2 over 3 in a top switch. He loses 5 points for placing 1 over 4 in a bottom switch. This results in a total loss of 8 points, so his score is 42.

If you did not realize that this was a combination of switches, you could have used the six com-parison bust calculation method:

Did you place 3/2? No, you lost 3 points

Did you place 3/4? Yes, you lost no points

Did you place 3/1? Yes, you lost no points

Did you place 2/4? Yes, you lost no points

Did you place2/1? Yes, you lost no points

Did you place 4/1? No, you lost 5 points

Total deductions = 8 points

Score = (50— 8 ) = 42

——————————————————————————————————————

SCENARIO 2 - Jamar has a bottom switch. Simply deduct 3 points for his incorrectly placing 1 over 3 and he has a score of 47.

——————————————————————————————————————-

SCENARIO 3 - Maria has a bust (more than one switch). Calculate her score using the six-step method:

Did you place 3/2? Yes, you lost no points

Did you place 3/4? Yes, you lost no points

Did you place 3/1? Yes, you lost no points

Did you place 2/4? No, you lost 2 points

Did you place2/1? No, you lost 2 + 4 = 6 points

Did you place 4/1? Yes, you lost no points

Total deductions = 8 points

Score = (50—8) = 42

——————————————————————————————————————-

SCENARIO 4 - Angela also has a bust.

Did you place 4/2? No, you lost 4 points

Did you place 4/3? No, you lost 4 + 3 = 7 points

Did you place 4/1? No, you lost 4 + 3 + 2 = 9 points

Did you place 2/3? No, you lost 3 points

Did you place2/1? No, you lost 3 + 2 = 5 points

Did you place 3/1? No, you lost 2 points

Total deductions = 30 points

Score = (50—30) = 20

Tables

Table 1. 

OBJECTIVES:

 

For youth to:

Compute judging scores.

 

Work on placing problems.

 

Compute cuts and scores.

SETTING:

Comfortable room

LIFE SKILLS:

Problem solving.

MATERIALS:

Copies of WHAT'S YOUR SCORE?

 

Activity Sheet for each youth.

 

Record/tape player & fast-paced music.

 

Pens/pencils

TIME:

1 1/2 Hours

Footnotes

1.

This document is 4H ASJ 20.5, excerpted from 4H-ASJ-20 (formerly 4H AJL 20), 4-H Livestock Judging: a 4-H Animal Science Project one of a series of the 4-H Youth Development Department, UF/IFAS Extension. Original publication date January 2012. Visit the EDIS website at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu.

2.

This edition of the Livestock Judging curriculum package was created by Chad Carr, assistant professor; Justin Crosswhite, graduate assistant; and Amanda Johnson, undergraduate assistant, Department of Animal Sciences. Authors of previous editions include: Julie Sexton and Karen Strickland, former project assistants; Allen Stateler, former graduate assistant; Saundra TenBroeck, associate professor and youth livestock Extension specialist; Tim Marshall, associate professor, Department of Animal Sciences; and Deborah J. Glauer, Extension youth development specialist and animal science design team leader, Department of Family, Youth and Community Sciences.


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. For more information on obtaining other UF/IFAS Extension publications, contact your county's UF/IFAS Extension office.

U.S. Department of Agriculture, UF/IFAS Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A & M University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating. Nick T. Place, dean for UF/IFAS Extension.