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Publication #SS-AGR-283

Using CleanWave Herbicide to Control Dogfennel in Pastures1

Brent Sellers and Jason Ferrell2

CleanWave is a newly labeled herbicide for use in Florida pastures. This herbicide contains a premix of aminopyralid (the active ingredient in Milestone) and fluroxypyr. This fact sheet describes how CleanWave can be used to control dogfennel in pastures.

The minimum recommended use rate for CleanWave is 14 oz/acre. At this application rate, the amount of fluroxypyr and aminopyralid is relatively low and will often not perform well if applied alone (Figure 1). Therefore, CleanWave is more likely to provide acceptable levels of control when used in combination with another herbicide to increase the weed control spectrum (see Table 1).

Tank-mix partners for CleanWave include 2,4-D amine, GrazonNext (or GrazonNext HL), Milestone, PastureGard (or PastureGard HL), and Remedy. Tank-mixing 14 oz of CleanWave with 3 pints of 2,4-D amine increases the control of dogfennel (Figure 2) and also controls pigweed, which is not controlled by CleanWave alone. Control with this combination is comparable to applying 2 pt/acre of PastureGard (1 pt/acre of PastureGard HL) or 3 pt/acre of WeedMaster.

CleanWave has a 0-day grazing restriction for beef cattle and lactating dairy animals; forage can be cut for hay 7 days after application. However, if CleanWave is mixed with herbicides that do carry grazing restrictions, these must be followed.

CleanWave can be effectively mixed with either GrazonNext formulation to improve dogfennel control while also achieving excellent tropical soda apple control. However, it must be noted that CleanWave contains some aminopyralid, the active ingredient in Milestone and one of the active ingredients in the GrazonNext formulations. Therefore, to prevent applying more than the maximum labeled rate of aminopyralid, do not tank-mix more than 6.4 oz of Milestone or 38 oz of GrazonNext (30 oz of GrazonNext HL) with 14 oz/A of CleanWave. Our research has shown that tank-mixes of CleanWave at 14 oz/A with 2 pt/acre of GrazonNext (or 1.6 pt/acre of GrazonNext HL) result in at least 85% control if dogfennel is treated when it is less than 40 inches tall.

Figure 1. 

Control of 40-inch-tall dogfennel 30 days after treatment with 14 oz/acre of CleanWave herbicide. Note that severe damage has occurred, but it is unlikely that complete control will be achieved.


Credit:

Brent Sellers, UF/IFAS


[Click thumbnail to enlarge.]

Figure 2. 

Control of 40-inch-tall dogfennel 30 days after treatment with 14 oz/acre of CleanWave tank-mixed with 3 pt/acre of 2,4-D amine. Note the increased control compared to CleanWave alone.


Credit:

Brent Sellers, UF/IFAS


[Click thumbnail to enlarge.]

If dogfennel is greater than 60 inches tall, it is better to apply PastureGard at 3 pt/acre or PastureGard HL at 1.5 pt/acre. If treating mixed stands of large dogfennel and tropical soda apple, add 1 pt/acre of PastureGard (0.5 pt/acre PastureGard HL) to 2 pt/acre of GrazonNext (1.6 pt/acre GrazonNext HL) for optimum dogfennel control. For further information, contact your local County Extension Agent. Remember to read and follow all herbicide labels.

Tables

Table 1. 

Tank-mix options for CleanWave herbicide. This table was taken directly from the supplemental CleanWave label, which was formulated based upon research conducted in Florida.

Rates of tank-mix partner

(fl oz/acre)

Cleanwave Rates Per Acre

<36” Dogfennel

36-60” Dogfennel

>60” Dogfennel

Low Rate

Mid Rate

High Rate

 

------------------------------fl oz/acre-------------------------------

2,4-D (32 to 64)

14

20

26.6

GrazonNext (24)

14

20

26.6

GrazonNext (32)

14

20

26.6

GrazonNext (41.6)

NONE

NONE

NONE

GrazonNext HL (19)

14

20

26.6

GrazonNext HL (26)

14

20

26.6

GrazonNext HL (34)

NONE

NONE

NONE

Milestone (4.1 to 4.7)

20

20

26.6

Milestone (5)

20

20

26.6

Milestone (5.85)

20

20

26.6

Milestone (7)

NONE

NONE

NONE

Remedy (24 to 32)

14

20

26.6

Footnotes

1.

This document is SS-AGR-283, one of a series of the Agronomy Department, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida. Original publication date October 2007. Revised January 2012. Visit the EDIS website at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu.

2.

Brent Sellers, associate professor, Agronomy Department, Range Cattle Research and Education Center, Ona, FL; Jason Ferrell, associate professor, Agronomy Department; Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611.

The use of trade names in this publication is solely for the purpose of providing specific information. UF/IFAS does not guarantee or warranty the products named, and references to them in this publication do not signify our approval to the exclusion of other products of suitable composition. All chemicals should be used in accordance with directions on the manufacturer's label.


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. For more information on obtaining other UF/IFAS Extension publications, contact your county's UF/IFAS Extension office.

U.S. Department of Agriculture, UF/IFAS Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A & M University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating. Nick T. Place, dean for UF/IFAS Extension.