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Publication #HS718

Yields of Vegetables1

D.N. Maynard and B.M. Santos2

Average yields of vegetables are of interest to growers, Extension agents, regulatory agencies, and others. They may be used to compare crop performance on an individual farm with the state average; as one basis for selecting alternative crops for a farm; or for settlement of claims resulting from natural causes or failure of a product to perform as advertised.

The commercial yields in Table 1 are statewide 10-year averages. Use of the 10-year average minimizes the effects of annual fluctuations due to weather or market conditions. At the same time, regular yield increases over the period due to improved varieties or cultural practices are masked by the 10-year average. In addition, use of statewide averages masks differences in yields from various Florida production areas.

The experimental yields in Table 1 are from variety trials conducted in various parts of the state for the number of experiments indicated for each vegetable. The 10 highest yielding varieties in each trial were used to calculate an average for that trial, and all trials were combined to develop an overall average which is shown in the table. The validity of the experimental yield increases with the number of experiments. Experimental yields have the same deficiencies as commercially-reported yields except that they are not subject to the effects of depressed markets or lapses in the reporting system. Yields from experimental plots are almost always higher than those from commercial fields because of the greater control of plant growth factors that can be achieved in small plots and the absence of the effects of depressed markets.

With all of the above-stated qualifications, it is apparent that these yield figures, although useful, are guidelines rather than absolute figures, and they must be used judiciously.

Tables

Table 1. 

Yields of vegetables in Florida.

Crop

Range

Average Yield per acre

Unit

Comments

Bush Bean

138–278

204

30-lb. bu.

10-yr. state average

   

175

30-lb. bu.

Avg. of 7 experiments

Broccoli

 

486

23-lb. crate

Avg. or 13 experiments

Cabbage

488–732

567

50-lb. crate

10-yr. state average

   

1148

50-lb. crate

Avg. of 7 experiments

Carrot

 

279

48 1-lb. bags

10-yr. state average

   

485

48 1-lb. bags

Avg. of 4 experiments

Cauliflower

 

475

25-lb. carton

Avg. of 9 experiments

Celery

 

668

60-lb. crate

10-yr. state average

   

1120

60-lb. crate

Avg. of 19 experiments

Chinese Cabbage (napa)

 

895

50-lb. crate

Avg. of 6 experiments

Chinese Cabbage (bok-choi)

 

410

50-lb. crate

Avg. of 5 experiments.

Collards

 

1145

25-lb. crate

Avg. of 8 experiments

Corn, sweet

243–353

312

42 lb. crate

10-yr. state average

   

385

42-lb. crate

Avg. of 20 experiments

Cucumber

420–694

537

55-lb. 1 1/9 bu.

10-yr. state average

   

415

55-lb. 1 1/9 bu.

Avg. of 11 experiments

Eggplant

639–853

761

33-lb. bu.

10-yr. state average

   

550

33-lb. bu.

Avg. of 2 experiments

Escarole

 

581

25-lb. crate

10-yr. state average

Honeydew melon

 

185

cwt.

Avg.of 6 experiments

Leek

 

368

cwt.

Avg. of 3 experiments

Lettuce (crisphead)

 

1065

50-lb. carton

Avg. of 3 experiments

Lettuce (romaine)

 

990

22-lb. carton

Avg. of 2 experiments

Muskmelon

 

325

cwt.

Avg. of 17 experiments.

Okra

 

770

30-lb. bu.

Avg. of 2 experiments

Onion (sweet, dry)

 

635

50-lb. bag

Avg. of 10 experiments

Pepper (bell)

789–1210

1052

28-lb. bu.

10-yr. state average

   

1135

28-lb. bu.

Avg. of 15 experiments

Pepper (cubanelle)

 

1075

25-lb. bu.

Avg. of 3 experiments

Potato, Irish

181–––308

235

cwt.

10-yr. state average

   

285

cwt.

Avg. of 11 experiments

Pumpkin

 

195

cwt.

Avg. of 6 experiments

Pumpkin (mini)

 

123

cwt.

Avg. of 3 experiments

Radicchio

 

1300

10-lb. carton

Avg. of 4 experiments

Radish

256––486

340

15-lb. carton

10-yr. state average

   

465

15-lb. carton

Avg. of 1 experiments

Snowpea

 

815

10-lb. carton

Avg. of 1 experiments

Southernpea

 

1725

lb. seed

Avg. of 4 experiments

Squash (zucchini)

210––346

284

42-lb. bu.

10-yr. state average

   

495

42-lb. bu.

Avg. of 9 experiments

Squash (yellow summer)

210––346

284

42-lb. bu.

10-yr. state average

   

430

42-lb. bu.

Avg. of 8 experiments

Squash (acorn)

 

205

cwt.

Avg. of 4 experiments

Squash (butternut)

 

200

cwt.

Avg. of 4 experiments

Sweetpotato

 

1480

50-lb. carton

Avg. of 2 experiments

Strawberry

2167–2917

2391

12-lb. flat

10-yr. state average

   

2440

12-lb. flat

Avg. of 4 experiments

Tomato (staked)

1250––1591

1416

25-lb. carton

10-yr. state average

   

2275

25-lb. carton

Avg. of 24 experiments

Tomato (cherry)

 

4010

15-lb. flat

Avg. of 2 experiments

Tomato (plum)

 

1475

25-lb. carton

Avg. of 2 experiments

Watermelon (icebox)

 

510

cwt.

Avg. of 2 experiments

Watermelon (seedless)

 

655

cwt.

Avg. of 10 experiments

Watermelon (standard)

200––320

252

cwt.

10-yr. state average

   

545

cwt.

Avg. of 17 experiments

Footnotes

1.

This document is HS718, one of a series of the Horticultural Sciences Department, UF/IFAS Extension. Original publication date June 1995. Revised September 2007. Reviewed September 2013. Visit the EDIS website at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu.

2.

D.N. Maynard, professor (retired), GCREC-Bradenton, and Bielinski M. Santos, assistant professor, Gulf Coast Research and Education Center, UF/IFAS Extension, Gainesville, FL 32611. The Vegetable Production Handbook for Florida is edited by S.M. Olson, professor, NFREC-Quincy, and E.H. Simonne, associate professor, Horticultural Sciences Department, UF/IFAS Extension.

The use of trade names in this publication is solely for the purpose of providing specific information. It is not a guarantee or warranty of the products named, and does not signify that they are approved to the exclusion of others of suitable composition. Use pesticides safely. Read and follow directions on the manufacturer's label.


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. For more information on obtaining other UF/IFAS Extension publications, contact your county's UF/IFAS Extension office.

U.S. Department of Agriculture, UF/IFAS Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A & M University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating. Nick T. Place, dean for UF/IFAS Extension.