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Publication #CV301

Chapter 5. Asian Vegetable Production1

Guodong Liu, Christian F. Miller, Bonnie Wells, Yuncong Li, and Qingren Wang2

This is Chapter 5 of the Vegetable Production Handbook of Florida, 2017–2018 edition. The most current version of this chapter may be found at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pdffiles/cv/cv30100.pdf.

The production of Asian vegetable crops in Florida contributes greatly to the diversity of the state’s agricultural industry. More than 20 types of Asian Vegetables are commercially grown in Florida. In recent years, increasing demand for these crops has resulted in rapid expansion of Asian vegetable production in northeast and south Florida. Though availability, profitability and competitiveness has increased, one point of concern creating confusion between producers and consumers is that many of the Asian Vegetable Crops have alternative names in other countries and cultures. Another concern is that, for many of these crops, there are few science based production recommendations available. This may limit production of these crops as local growers attempt to determine crop requirements with limited guidance. Before specific recommendations are developed for these crops, Asian vegetable growers should follow recommendations which are available for crops closely related to these Asian vegetables.

The objectives of this publication are to (1) provide various names of some Asian vegetable crops and EDIS publications available to readers; (2) list related chapters of this handbook which provide recommendations for crops close to these Asian vegetables grown in Florida; and (3) list EDIS publications currently available for Asian vegetables. We strongly encourage growers of Asian vegetable to follow the UF/IFAS recommendations of related crops before the UF/IFAS recommendations are established.

Web links for EDIS Publications available for growers of Asian vegetables

Luffa—an Asian Vegetable Emerging in Florida: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1285

Tong Hao—an Asian Vegetable Emerging in Florida: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1276

Long Squash—an Asian Vegetable Emerging in Florida: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1272

Bitter Melon—an Asian Vegetable Emerging in Florida: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1271

Long Bean—an Asian Vegetable Emerging in Florida: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1268

Tables

Table 1. 

Common name and botanical classification for selected asian vegetables.

Vegetable Type

Common Name

Other Names

Family Name

Related Crop Grown in Florida

Root

Daikon radish

long white radish, Oriental radish, white radish, winter radish

Brassicaceae (Cruciferae)

Radish (Chapter 15)

Lobok radish

Chinese radish

Brassicaceae (Cruciferae)

Radish (Chapter 15)

Leafy

A choy

Taiwanese Lettuce

Brassicaceae (Cruciferae)

Lettuce (Chapter 9)

Shalihon

Xue li hong, mustart green

Brassicaceae (Cruciferae)

Lettuce (Chapter 9)

Tong Hao

Tahn ho, Shungiku, crown daisy, garland daisy, edible chrysanthemum, garland chrysanthemum, or chrysanthemum greens

Brassicaceae (Cruciferae)

Lettuce (Chapter 9)

Napa

Napa cabbage

Brassicaceae (Cruciferae)

Cabbage (Chapter 6)

Long napa

Peking cabbage, celery cabbage

Brassicaceae (Cruciferae)

Cabbage (Chapter 6)

Shanghai bok choy

bok choy, pak choi, bok choi, pok choy

Brassicaceae (Cruciferae)

Cabbage (Chapter 6)

U choy

Yu choy, Chinese greens

Brassicaceae (Cruciferae)

Cabbage (Chapter 6)

Taiwan cabbage

Tainwan flat cabbage; Li Sun Cabbage, Flathead Cabbage

Brassicaceae (Cruciferae)

Cabbage (Chapter 6)

Wawa choy

Baby Chinese Cabbage

Brassicaceae (Cruciferae)

Cabbage (Chapter 6)

Flower Fruit

Gailon

Chinese broccoli (Kale)

Brassicaceae (Cruciferae)

Cabbage (Chapter 6)

Long squash

Po Gua, Poo Gua, Hu Gua, Opo Squash, birdhouse gourd, bottle gourd, calabash gourd, hard-shelled gourd, dolphin gourd, long melon, opo squash, trumpet gourd, and white-flower gourd

Cucurbitaceae

Cucumber (Chapter 7)

Fuzzy squash

hairy gourd, fuzzy melon

Cucurbitaceae

Cucumber (Chapter 7)

Luffa

Loofa, Loofah, Chinese okra, angled loofah, dishcloth sponge

Cucurbitaceae

Cucumber (Chapter 7)

Kabocha

japanese pumpkin, Kabocha squash, Kent pumpkin

Cucurbitaceae

Cucumber (Chapter 7)

Long bean dark green

asparagus bean, Chinese long bean, long-podded cowpea, and yardlong bean

Fabaceae

Legume (Chapter 11)

Long bean white

Chinese long bean, haricot asperge, pea bean, dow gauk

Fabaceae

Legume (Chapter 11)

Footnotes

1.

This document is CV301, one of a series of the Horticultural Sciences Department, UF/IFAS Extension. Original publication date July 2017. Visit the EDIS website at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu.

2.

Guodong Liu, assistant professor, Horticultural Sciences Department; Christian F. Miller, Extension agent I, UF/IFAS Extension Palm Beach County; Bonnie Wells, Extension agent I, UF/IFAS Extension St. Johns County; Yuncong Li, professor, UF/IFAS Tropical Research and Education Center; and Qingren Wang, Extension agent I, UF/IFAS Extension Miami-Dade County; UF/IFAS Extension, Gainesville, FL 32611.


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. For more information on obtaining other UF/IFAS Extension publications, contact your county's UF/IFAS Extension office.

U.S. Department of Agriculture, UF/IFAS Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A & M University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating. Nick T. Place, dean for UF/IFAS Extension.