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Publication #HS1236

2013 Sweet Corn Variety Performance Trial, Jay, Florida1

Darcy Telenko, Libbie Johnson, and William Wendt2

This report includes a summary of the 2013 sweet corn variety trial at the UF West Florida Research and Education Center Jay Research farm in Jay, Florida. It shows the performance of fifteen commercial and experimental Sh2 (supersweet) sweet corn varieties. This data only represents one year and one location; test results should be considered over several years and locations before final conclusions are valid.

Sh2 Supersweet Varieties Evaluated. 

Yellow

White

Bicolor

SC1336

QHW6RH1229

EX08767143

Passion

1760 MR

Obsession

ACR 3181 MR

8909 MR

Obsession II

GSS 0966

WSS 0987

7932 MR

 

Munition

2760 MR

   

BSS 0977

2013 Growing Conditions and Experimental Design

On 2 April 2013, sweet corn varieties were planted 3 seed/ft under conventional tillage in a Red Bay sandy loam soil that was planted in a rotation of peanut in 2012 and fallow in 2011. Prior to planting, granular fertilizer (5-55-30, 500 lb/A) was broadcast and incorporated. Plots were 25 ft long and 12 ft wide, and rows were spaced 36 in. apart. Sweet corn varieties were replicated in four randomized complete blocks by color (yellow, white, and bicolor). Each color block was separated by 20 border rows to reduce cross-pollination. Supplemental nitrogen was applied on 6 May (33-0-0, 400 lb/A). No herbicides were applied, but plots were cultivated twice (when crop was 6 in. tall and at fertilization on 6 May). Subsurface drip irrigation provided approximately 1-in. of water per week from time of silking until harvest. No subsurface drip was applied before silking. Lannate (methomyl) 1.3 pt/A was applied on 27 May, 30 May, and 4 June. Asana (esfenvalerate) 9.6 oz/A was applied on 29 May and 4 June. Wet conditions limited spraying of three additional planned insecticide sprays. Data was collected from two center rows of each plot. Plots were hand harvested on 20 June (reps 1 and 2) and 21 June (reps 3 and 4); this was 79 and 80 days after planting and corresponded to the average maturity of the varieties (78–82 days). Rainfall for April, May and June was 2.3, 7.1, and 0.7 in. below normal in Jay, Florida, for 2013 (Table 1). Normal represented the mean for the past 53 years of record.

Summary

Stand count for all varieties ranged from 1.58 to 1.97 plants/ft (22,869 to 28,532 plants/A), with no significant differences between varieties (Table 2). The bicolor varieties overall averaged higher US Fancy yields (549 crates/A) than both the yellow (448 crates/A) and white (423 crates/A) varieties (Table 3). BSS 0977 was the highest yielding variety with 58,516 total ears/A, 46,609 marketable ears/A, and 616 US Fancy crates/A. Obsession and Obsession II were the next highest yielding varieties, followed by EX08767143 and 7932 MR. The lowest yielding bicolor was 2760 MR. Among the yellow varieties, SC1336 showed the highest yield, followed by GSS 0966 and Passion. ACR 3181 MR was the lowest yielding variety of all those tested, with only 368 crates/A. Munition and 1760 MR were the highest yielding white varieties, but they were not significantly different from QHW6RH1229, 8909 MR, and WSS 0987.

Ratings for the shanks of the sweet corn ranged from 3.3 to 4.2 across all varieties, with GSS 9066 having the longest shank and QHW6RH1229 the shortest (Table 4). Husk quality ranged from 4.6 to 5.0, so in general all husks were above average in color. Flag leaf ratings ranged from 2.2 to 4.5, with 1760 MR and 7932 MR having the highest rating of all the varieties. In general most ears evaluated had less than one-inch gag. GSS 0966, 1760 MR, and WSS 0987 had the greatest tip fill, while SC1336 and Passion had the least. Average number of rows per ear ranged from 14.1 in WSS 0987 to 18.4 in SC1336. Average ear length ranged from 7.1 to 8.3 inches across all varieties. ACR 3181 MR and 2760 MR had the longest ears of all varieties evaluated. Significant ear worm developed in the plots, because three planned sprays were missed before harvest. Conventional varieties that did not have insecticide resistance averaged 55% ear worm damage. Four varieties with insecticide resistance packages (GSS 0966, WSS 0987, Obsession II, and BSS 0977) had 32% less ear worm damage than the conventional varieties, with Obsession II showing as little as 2.5% damage.

Tables

Table 1. 

Weather conditions during 2013 sweet corn trial

Month

Total rainfall (in.)

Average minimum air temperature (°F)

Average maximum air temperature (°F)

April

4.7 (2.3 below normal*)

40.6

83.7

May

0.7 (7.1 below normal)

43.0

91.8

June

5.8 (0.7 below normal)

65.5

93.8

*Normal represents the mean for the past 53 years of record.

Table 2. 

Sweet corn variety emergence for in Jay, Florida, 2013

Cultivar

Maturity (days)

Type

Color

Plants/ft*

(20 Jun)

Plants/A*

(20 Jun)

SC1336................................................................

81

Sh2

Yellow

1.88

27,298

Passion.................................................................

80

Sh2

Yellow

1.80

26,136

ACR 3181 MR......................................................

80

Sh2

Yellow

1.58

22,869

GSS 0966.............................................................

79

Sh2

Yellow

1.75

25,410

QHW6RH1229......................................................

82

Sh2

White

1.61

23,305

1760 MR..............................................................

82

Sh2

White

1.77

25,700

8909 MR..............................................................

79

Sh2

White

1.93

27,951

WSS 0987............................................................

78

Sh2

White

1.83

26,572

Munition..............................................................

78

Sh2

White

1.82

26,354

EX08767143.........................................................

80

Sh2

Bicolor

1.79

25,991

Obsession.............................................................

78

Sh2

Bicolor

1.92

27,806

Obsession II..........................................................

78

Sh2

Bicolor

1.80

26,136

7932 MR..............................................................

78

Sh2

Bicolor

1.89

27,370

2760 MR..............................................................

82

Sh2

Bicolor

1.91

27,661

BSS 0977............................................... BSS 0977

78

Sh2

Bicolor

1.97

28,532

LSD.............................................................................

     

ns

ns

CV...............................................................................

     

12.6

12.6

* Determined from counts of two, 25 ft rows per plot.

Means are not significantly different according to Fisher’s Protected LSD (P=0.05).

Table 3. 

Sweet corn variety trial, WFREC, Jay, FL

Cultivar

Ear height (in.)v

Picking easew

% Large earsx

% Medium earsx

% Cull earsx

Total Ears/A

Marketable Ears/Ay

U.S. Fancy crate/Az

SC1336................

16.7 de

4.0 c

63.7 abc

24.5 a-d

11.7 def

36,518 cd

32,162 bcd

490 a-e

Passion.................

16.8 cde

4.0 c

65.2 ab

24.8 a-d

10.0 f

34,122 d-f

30,637 b-e

466 b-e

ACR 3181 MR......

16.5 e

4.8 ab

55.5 b-e

21.6 bcd

22.9 bc

30,928 f

23,958 e

368 e

GSS 0966.............

20.1 a

4.5 abc

53.7 cde

27.1 abc

19.3 b-e

40,583 b-f

32,960 bcd

469 b-e

QHW6RH1229......

19.2 a-d

4.8 ab

65.1 ab

23.2 a-d

11.7 def

31,145 ef

27,443 cde

425 de

1760 MR..............

13.1 f

4.5 abc

58.7 bcd

19.1 cd

22.2 bc

34,412 def

27,007 de

436 cde

8909 MR..............

11.7 f

5.0 a

53.3 cde

26.1 a-d

20.6 bcd

35,937 c-f

28,604 cde

413 de

WSS 0987............

20.2 a

4.5 abc

44.6 ef

31.9 a

23.6 bc

40,801 b-e

31,799 b-e

404 de

Munition...............

17.4 b-e

4.8 ab

37.9 f

29.6 ab

32.5 a

48,569 b

34,122 bcd

439 cde

EX08767143..........

16.6 e

4.8 ab

66.4 ab

18.6 cd

15.0 c-f

38,696 c-f

32,743 bcd

534 a-d

Obsession..............

19.7 ab

5.0 a

70.2 a

18.2 d

11.6 ef

40,003 b-f

35,066 bc

572 abc

Obsession II...........

19.3 a-c

4.5 abc

64.3 abc

20.8 cd

14.9 c-f

45,157 bc

37,752 b

599 ab

7932 MR..............

13.9 f

4.5 abc

59.9 abc

24.6 a-d

15.6 b-f

41,527 bcd

34,848 bcd

522 a-d

2760 MR..............

17.2 cde

4.8 ab

56.4 bcd

19.3 cd

24.3 ab

36,663 c-f

27,515 cde

452 cde

BSS 0977.............

21.5 a

4.3 bc

47.7 def

31.3 a

21.0 bc

58,516 a

46,609 a

616 a

LSD..........................

2.5

0.7

11.3

8.8

8.9

9666

7895

140

CV............................

10.2

11.0

13.8

25.6

33.9

17

17

20

v Ear height determined from five plants per plot.

w Picking ease rated on a scale of 1–5 where 1 = difficult and 5 = easy.

x % of large (greater than 7 inches in length, U.S. Fancy*), % medium ears (5–7 inches in length, U.S. No. 1), and % cull ears (unmarketable ears) were determined from all harvested ears.

y Marketable ears includes both large and medium ears.

z U.S. Fancy crate/A is based on a four-dozen crate size and includes only large ears (U.S. Fancy grade).

Means followed by the same letter(s) are not significantly different according to Fisher’s Protected LSD (P=0.05)

*United States Standards for Grades of Sweet Corn, USDA Agricultural Marketing Service, Fruit and Vegetables Programs, Fresh Produce Branch, February 12, 1992 (Reprinted January 1997)

Table 4. 

Sweet corn variety trial, individual ear evaluation, WFREC, Jay, FL

Cultivar

Shank

(1–5)v

Husk quality (1–5)w

Flag leaf

(1–5)x

Tip fill

(1–5)y

Number of rows

Ear length (in.)

% Ear worm damagez

SC1336................

3.7 b-f

4.8 bc

2.2 g

3.8 fg

18.4 a

7.6 ef

57.5 ab

Passion.................

3.7 bcd

4.6 e

2.8 ef

3.7 g

17.0 cd

7.7 cde

60.0 ab

ACR 3181 MR......

4.0 abc

5.0 a

3.7 c

4.3 b-e

17.3 bc

8.2 a

67.5 a

GSS 0966.............

4.2 a

4.9 ab

3.9 bc

4.8 a

14.8 gh

7.2 gh

32.5 cd

QHW6RH1229......

3.2 g

4.6 de

2.6 efg

4.2 cde

16.2 ef

7.8 bc

55.0 ab

1760 MR..............

4.0 ab

5.0 a

4.5 a

4.7 a

17.0 cd

7.9 b

52.5 abc

8909 MR..............

3.5 efg

4.9 ab

3.7 c

4.5 a-d

15.5 fg

7.6 ef

55.0 ab

WSS 0987............

3.8 b-e

5.0 a

3.5 cd

4.8 a

14.1 h

7.1 h

17.5 de

Munition...............

3.7 b-f

5.0 a

3.6 c

4.1 ef

15.9 ef

7.5 f

52.5 abc

EX08767143..........

3.5 efg

4.8 bcd

2.5 efg

4.2 de

17.1 bcd

7.8 bcd

57.5 ab

Obsession..............

3.3 fg

4.7 cde

2.5 fg

4.2 de

16.5 de

7.7 cde

42.5 bc

Obsession II...........

3.5 d-g

4.7 cde

3.0 de

4.1 ef

17.0 cd

7.6 de

2.5 e

7932 MR..............

3.9 a-d

4.9 ab

4.3 ab

4.6 abc

15.9 ef

7.9 bc

57.5 ab

2760 MR..............

3.7 b-f

5.0 a

3.9 bc

4.6 ab

17.8 ab

8.3 a

47.5 abc

BSS 0977.............

3.6 c-f

4.9 ab

3.6 c

4.2 e

15.8 f

7.3 g

17.5 de

LSD..........................

0.4

0.2

0.5

0.3

0.7

0.2

20.6

CV............................

25.1

8.2

33.9

18.1

9.8

5.4

104.2

Ten ears from each plot were evaluated.

v Shank rated on a scale of 1 to 5, where 1= short, 3= average, 5= long.

w Husk quality rated on a scale of 1 to 5, where 1=dull, 3= average, 5= very attractive.

x Flag leaf rated on a scale of 1 to 5, where 1= none, 3= somewhat attractive, 5= very attractive.

y Tip fill rated on a scale of 1 to 5, where 1= more than 2 inch gag, 3= 1 inch gag, 5= complete tip fill.

z % Ear worm damage calculated from number of the ten ears with visible damage.

Means followed by the same letter(s) are not significantly different according to Fisher’s Protected LSD (P=0.05).

Footnotes

1.

This document is HS1236, one of a series of the Horticultural Sciences Department, UF/IFAS Extension, Gainesville 32611. Original publication date November 2013. Visit the EDIS website at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu.

2.

Darcy E. P. Telenko, postdoctoral research associate, West Florida Research and Education Center, Jay, 32565; Libbie Johnson, Extension agent, Escambia County, Cantonment, FL 32533; William Wendt, specialty crop project manager, West Florida Research and Education Center, Jay, FL 32565; UF/IFAS Extension, Gainesville, FL 32611.


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. For more information on obtaining other UF/IFAS Extension publications, contact your county's UF/IFAS Extension office.

U.S. Department of Agriculture, UF/IFAS Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A & M University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating. Nick T. Place, dean for UF/IFAS Extension.