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The Savvy Survey #12: Telephone Surveys

older man on cell phoneThis publication provides a brief overview of how to develop and conduct a telephone survey to collect data. It assumed that a list of phone numbers, such as program registration lists, is available for conducting program evaluations or assessing needs. When volunteers or staff assist with the survey by interviewing respondents, this data collection method can be economical and effective. Careful attention is needed when developing the questionnaire and supporting materials and when orienting interviewers in order to obtain credible survey data. In the right situation, telephone surveys can be a valuable tool for Extension agents and specialists. This 7-page fact sheet was written by Glenn D. Israel and Jessica L. Gouldthorpe, and published by the UF Department of Agricultural Education and Communication, October 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pd076

Tracking the Economic Benefits Generated by the Hard Clam Aquaculture Industry in Florida

handful of clams The hard clam industry is a true success story for commercial aquaculture in Florida. From a cottage industry borne of reductions in commercial wild clam harvests in the Indian River Lagoon during the late 1980s, hard clam aquaculture has now developed into an industry that is rivaled by no other aquaculture food product in Florida. Although successful by virtually any metric, the risks and uncertainty associated with commercial hard clam culture has led to the evaluation of programs that help mitigate risk, such as the former pilot Cultivated Clam Crop Insurance Program administered by USDA Risk Management Agency. All of this alludes to the economic importance of the hard clam culture industry which, through the cultivation process and sales of products, generates local income and taxes, creates jobs and businesses, and draws new money into the local economy, as cultured hard clams are sold to non-residents and buyers outside the region and state. This 6-page fact sheet provides an overview of a recent study by the University of Florida to provide an estimate of the impact of the hard clam industry to the Florida economy. Written by Charles Adams, Leslie Sturmer, and Alan Hodges, and published by the UF Department of Food and Resource Economics, October 2014. (UF/IFAS photo by Tom Wright)
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe961

Fins & Scales: An Introduction to Bony Fish : A Marine Science Project Guide for 4-H Leaders and Educators

Figure 1. The 4-H Fins and Scales Project provides youth with opportunities to investigate fish and their adaptations for living in water.The Fins and Scales Project is intended for youth age 11-13 (Intermediate 4-Hers). The Leaders Guide follows the layout of the Youth Project Book and provides a suggested approach for each section. Each section of the Leaders Guide contains: Additional background information, answer key, additional activities, opportunities to review, “dive deeper,” and “think like a scientist.” This 52-page project guide was written by Karen Blyler, and published by the UF Department of 4-H Youth Development, October 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/4h355

Fins & Scales: An Introduction to Bony Fish : A Marine Science Project Book for 4-H Intermediate Members

Figure 1. Fish have special adaptations that help them survive in water.In this project youth will learn about fish and their adaptations for living in water. This 48-page Intermediate level (ages 11-13) project book was written by Karen Blyler, and published by the UF Department of 4-H Youth Development, October 2014.
Contents: A. What is a fish? B. How do fins help a fish? C. How does body shape help a fish? D. How does body color help a fish? E. Why do fish have different mouths? F. Why do fish have scales? G. How can we determine a fish’s age?
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/4h354

Conflicts between People and the Florida Black Bear

Figure 1. A Florida black bear searching for food. Prevent problems before they start with bear-resistant garbage cans.An adult black bear may eat up to the equivalent calorie content of 38 Big Mac sandwiches a day, and can smell food from one to two miles away. Garbage is the main attractant, but bears are also attracted by bee hives, pet food, barbeque grills, fruit trees, and bird (or wildlife) feeders. Conflicts between people and black bears arise when people fail to remove or secure potential food sources. In their search for food, black bears may damage property and threaten, injure, or kill pets and livestock in order to gain access to their feed. This 5-page fact sheet provides tips for preventing human-bear conflicts and tells how to report conflicts if they happen. Written by Elizabeth F. Pienaar, and published by the UF Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, September 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw389

Floridians' Perceptions of Invasive Species

invasive plantsInvasive species are a serious threat in Florida. Invasive species are defined as non-native or exotic organisms, which cause ecological or economic harm or negatively affect human health in a new environment where they are not historically found. This 5-page fact sheet summarizes Florida residents’ perceptions, concerns, and knowledge about invasive species. This information will equip Extension faculty to more effectively communicate and educate clientele on this topic. Written by Nicole M. W. Dodds, Mary Hannah Miller, and Alexa J. Lamm, and published by the UF Department of Agricultural Education and Communication, October 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc186

The Four Rs of Fertilizer Management

4 R's: right rate, right source, right placement, right timingSupplying needed nutrients for crop production involves attention to four major fertilization factors (the 4Rs): right rate, right source, right placement, and right timing. Attention to these factors will provide adequate nutrition for crop production while minimizing the risk of loss of nutrients to the environment. In this publication each factor is described, as well as how the information can be provided from a soil test report. While not a formal part of the 4Rs, the importance of irrigation to overall nutrient management is stressed in this 4-page fact sheet written by George Hochmuth, Rao Mylavarapu, and Ed Hanlon, and published by the UF Department of Soil and Water Science, October 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ss624

Fertilizer Recommendation Philosophies

Figure 2. Incorporating fertilizer for an experiment on fertilizer rate and source for tomato.Farmers receive varying fertilizer recommendations depending on which lab they consult because labs employ different chemical methods and procedures to analyze the samples and subscribe to different fertilizer recommendation philosophies. This 4-page fact sheet explains the main soil-test philosophies, their basis, and their applications, and explains why the Sufficiency Level of Available Nutrient philosophy (SLAN), also called the Crop Nutrient Requirement (CNR), is most likely to be the best to govern fertilizer recommendations in Florida today. Written by George Hochmuth, Rao Mylavarapu, and Ed Hanlon, and published by the UF Department of Soil and Water Science, October 2014. (Photo by George Hochmuth, UF/IFAS)
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ss623

Soil Testing for Plant-Available Nutrients: What Is It and Why Do We Use It?

Figure 1. Scheme illustrating random soil sampling on a commercial agricultural farm or a landscapeFarmers need soil-testing procedures to assess soils for potential plant-available nutrients. Soil testing is the foremost best management practice (BMP). It helps farmers achieve profitable crops while protecting the environment from excessive fertilization and nutrient losses. This 5-page fact sheet describes the important steps required to test soil for potential plant-available nutrients. Written by George Hochmuth, Rao Mylavarapu, and Ed Hanlon, and published by the UF Department of Soil and Water Science, October 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ss621

Floridians' Perceptions of Endangered Species

Red cockaded woodpecker In July 2014, the UF/IFAS Center for Public Issues Education in Agriculture and Natural Resources (PIE Center) initiated a study to explore the attitudes, perceptions, opinions, and knowledge of Floridians on endangered and invasive species. The majority of respondents to the survey have favorable views of endangered species but few consider themselves knowledgeable on the issue. This 4-page fact sheet can equip Extension faculty to more effectively communicate with and educate clientele about endangered species. Written by Mary Hannah Miller, Nicole M.W. Dodds, & Alexa J. Lamm, and published by the UF Department of Agricultural Education and Communication, October 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc185

Developing a Soil Test Extractant: The Correlation and Calibration Processes

Soil Sampling.An understanding of soil testing is an important part of preventing excess fertilizer applications that can potentially impact the environment and ensuring commercially viable yields and aesthetic, healthy landscapes. This 4-page fact sheet describes the process UF/IFAS soil scientists used to develop a predictive and/or diagnostic soil test that can be depended on by commercial agricultural and horticultural producers as well as homeowners and can provide accurate nutrient recommendations or diagnose nutrient imbalances for crops or plants. Written by George Hochmuth, Rao Mylavarapu, and Ed Hanlon, and published by the UF Department of Soil and Water Science, October 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ss622

Extension Professionals: Anticipating and Solving Common Challenges in Planning and Delivering Educational Programs

Teacher with students on road in forestThe work of an Extension agent demands much more than just subject knowledge. An Extension career is exciting because no two days are the same. With that comes a variety of unexpected challenges. The delivery of programs to diverse clienteles is, in itself, a skill and something that Extension agents improve over time. This article summarizes some common problems associated with delivering Extension programs and to recommend solutions. This 5-page fact sheet was written by Laura A. Warner and Kathryn A. Stofer, and published by the UF Department of Agricultural Education and Communication, September 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc178

Imperial Moth Eacles imperialis imperialis (Drury, 1773) (Insecta: Lepidoptera: Saturniidae: Ceratocampinae)

Figure 1. Imperial moth, Eacles imperialis (Drury). The imperial moth is one of our largest and most beautiful moths. It is also the most variable in appearance and the most widely distributed of our large eastern U.S. saturniid moths. This 9-page fact sheet was written by Donald W. Hall, and published by the UF Department of Entomology and Nematology, September 2014.
(Photo: Donald W. Hall, University of Florida) http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/in1051

Homemade Household Cleaners

Figure 1.  Budget-friendly homemade cleaners can save you money.Are you on a budget? Running low on those household cleaners? Instead of heading to the store to buy those more expensive cleaners, make your own! Many homemade household cleaners can be made with just a few inexpensive products that will last a lot longer. This 3-page fact sheet was written by Amanda Griffin and Randall A. Cantrell, and published by the UF Department of Family Youth and Community Sciences, October 2014. (Photo: iStock/Thinkstock.com)
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy1449

Facts about Potassium

Figure 1. Legumes are excellent sources of potassium. Whether you start with the dried form or use convenient canned beans (low sodium is best), you will get a rich source of potassium.Potassium is a mineral found inside body cells. It is one of several minerals known as electrolytes. It is important because it helps regulate fluid and electrolyte balance, maintain normal blood pressure, transmit nerve impulses, control muscle contraction, and maintain healthy bones. Legumes are good sources of potassium, as are nuts and seeds. This 2-page fact sheet was written by R. Elaine Turner and Linda B. Bobroff, and published by the UF Department of Family Youth and Community Sciences, September 2014. (Photo: tofumax/iStock/Thinkstock.com)
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy889

2014 Cool-Season Forage Variety Recommendations for Florida

A row of rye grass in a field of crops in North Florida. UF/IFAS Photo: Josh Wickham.This 4-page fact sheet provides the most up-to-date information on current adapted varieties of cool-season forages. The recommendation of varieties is based on multi-location, multi-year cultivar evaluation experiments that may include trials in Georgia and other states. Table 1 includes information about the planting dates, seeding rates, and other considerations. If you have questions about a particular variety, contact your local UF/IFAS Extension agent for additional information. Written by A. R. Blount, J. M. B. Vendramini, J. C. B. Dubeux, Md A. Babar, K. E. Kenworthy, P. R. Muñoz,and K. H. Quesenberry, and published by the UF Department of Agronomy, September 2014. (UF/IFAS Photo: Josh Wickam)
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/aa266

A Farm to School Procurement Calculator for Specialty Crop Producers and School Food Service Staff

Farm to School logoFlorida Farm to School programs are designed to connect producers with schools. But school food service staff make their purchasing decisions in terms of servings and producers pack their products by weight. General calculators and guides designed for national Farm to School programs don’t address Florida’s diverse production of fresh fruits and vegetables. This procurement calculator and guide for Florida Farm to School programs was written by Jonathan A. Watson, Danielle Treadwell, Anna Prizzia, and Kelli Brew, and published by the UF Department of Horticultural Sciences, September 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1250

Advanced Tree Risk Assessment: Resistance Recording Drills

Figure 4. Close-up of the IML Resistograph® in use.Resistance recording drills are specialized pieces of decay detection equipment that may be used as part of an advanced risk assessment. While not required for tree risk assessment work, resistance recording drills have been shown to be effective in helping arborists detect and document internal tree decay in trees. This 5-page fact sheet was written by Drew McLean, Andrew Koeser, and Gitta Hasing, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, October 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep504

Homeowner Best Management Practices for the Home Lawn

turfgrassA healthy lawn is an important component of an urban landscape. Loss of turf health and misuse of fertilizers can result increased nonpoint source pollution, so homeowners should use Best Management Practices when maintaining their lawns. Best Management Practices follow Florida-Friendly Landscaping™ principles, developed for maintenance of a healthy landscape that does not contribute to nonpoint source pollution. This 6-page fact sheet provides easy-to-follow tips on Florida-friendly lawn maintenance. Written by Laurie E. Trenholm, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, October 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep236

Jalapeño and Other Hot Pepper Varieties for Florida

Capsico
The jalapeño is derived from the Capsicum genus of the family Solanaceae. Jalapeños are members of a diverse group, which also include ancho poblano, cayenne, serrano, Anaheim, banana, Asian, habanero, and Hungarian wax peppers. Hot peppers are classified by their heat and shape. The heat of the pepper comes from the chemical compound capsaicin, which is measured by the Scoville scale. This 8-page fact sheet is a guide of jalapeño and other hot pepper varieties used in Florida was written by Monica Ozores-Hampton and Gene McAvoy, and published by the UF Department of Horticultural Sciences, October 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1241


2012 ROA information

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