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Publication #CIRCULAR 860

Flowering Vines for Florida1

Sydney Park Brown and Gary W. Knox2

Many flowering vines thrive in Florida's mild climate. By carefully choosing among this diverse and wonderful group of plants, you can have a vine blooming in your landscape almost every month of the year.

Vines can function in the landscape in many ways. When grown on arbors, they provide lovely "doorways" to our homes or provide transition points from one area of the landscape to another (Figure 1). Unattractive trees, posts, and poles can be transformed using vines to alter their form, texture, and color (Figure 2).Vines can be used to soften and add interest to fences, walls, and other hard spaces (Figures 3 and 4).

Figure 1. 

Painted trumpet (Bignonia callistegioides).


Credit:

Gary Knox, UF/IFAS


[Click thumbnail to enlarge.]

Figure 2. 

Trumpet honeysuckle (Lonicera sempervirens).


Credit:

Gary Knox, UF/IFAS


[Click thumbnail to enlarge.]

Figure 3. 

Chinese hat plant (Holmskioldia sanguinea).


Credit:

Gary Knox


[Click thumbnail to enlarge.]

Figure 4. 

Yew Dell akebia and door.


Credit:

Gary Knox, UF/IFAS


[Click thumbnail to enlarge.]

A deciduous vine grown over a patio provides a cool retreat in summer and a sunny outdoor living area in winter (Figure 5). Muscadine and bunch grapes are deciduous vines that fulfill that role and produce abundant fruit. For more information on selecting and growing grapes in Florida, go to http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ag208 or contact your county extension office for a copy.

Figure 5. 

Pergola in Gainesville.


Credit:

Gary Knox, UF/IFAS


[Click thumbnail to enlarge.]

Vines can be used as living walls that provide privacy and/or screen unsightly views (Figure 6). Narrow plant beds are the perfect spot to "vertically garden" with a vine and, finally, vines attract wildlife. They provide protective cover and nesting areas for birds, and many flowering vines are rich nectar sources for butterflies and hummingbirds.

Figure 6. 

Confederate jasmine (Trachelospermum jasminoides).


Credit:

Gary Knox, UF/IFAS


[Click thumbnail to enlarge.]

Unfortunately, despite their many uses, vines are seldom seen in most Florida landscapes. This publication will introduce you to many plants that deserve more use. The vines listed in Table 1 are good choices for Florida, but many others exist.

How Vines Climb

Vines need some type of support when grown upright in the landscape. To choose the right support for a particular vine, it is important to understand how the vine is going to climb. Vines can be separated into three basic types: clinging, twining, and sprawling.

Clinging vines attach to surfaces using specialized organs such as roots or tendrils. English ivy (Hedera helix) and trumpet creeper (Campsis radicans) (Figure 7) are examples of vines with adhesive rootlets. They can be difficult to remove and their roots can loosen mortar between bricks or concrete blocks in masonry walls. Other types of clinging vines include passion vine (Passiflora species) (Figure 8) and cross vine (Bignonia capreolata) (Figure 9) that climb by means of tendrils that curl around supports in response to friction. These can be used to cover lattice, wire mesh, or other supports that spread horizontally. Clinging vines are often used to cover solid upright surfaces such as trees, fences, or walls. Vines grown on wooden walls or fences may prevent the wood surface from drying and increase the chance of decay.

Figure 7. 

Trumpet creeper (Campsis radicans) is an example of a clinging vine with adhesive rootlets.


Credit:

Gary Knox, UF/IFAS


[Click thumbnail to enlarge.]

Figure 8. 

Passion vine (Passiflora caerulea) climbs by means of tendrils that curl around supports in response to friction.


Credit:

Gary Knox, UF/IFAS


[Click thumbnail to enlarge.]

Figure 9. 

Cross vine (Bignonia capreolata) climbs by means of tendrils that curl around supports in response to friction.


Credit:

Gary Knox, UF/IFAS


[Click thumbnail to enlarge.]

Twining vines climb by encircling upright vertical supports. They are often used on poles, vertical wires, or lattice structures. Most of these vines will spiral in only one direction characteristic of the species. If made to spiral in the opposite direction, most will not cooperate and the vine may be damaged. Twining vines include mandevilla (Mandevilla splendens) and Confederate jasmine (Trachelospermum jasminoides) (Figures 6 and 10).

Figure 10. 

Confederate jasmine (Trachelospermum jasminoides) is an example of a twining vine.


Credit:

Gary Knox, UF/IFAS


[Click thumbnail to enlarge.]

Sprawling or clambering vines are basically shrubs that produce long shoots, but have no means of attaching themselves to a support. This type of vine needs to be manually wound around a support or braced up in some way. With age, they usually become woody and self-supporting. Bougainvillea is an example of a sprawling vine.

The Planting Site

Site characteristics such as amount of sun or shade, salt spray, water drainage, and soil type determine the type of vine that can be grown and its placement within the landscape. Plant location in a landscape will also influence how well it will tolerate cold temperatures. Tender species of vines can be planted on the south and east sides of buildings where they are more protected from cold northwestern winds. Vines planted beside buildings, or under overhangs or trees, get more protection from cold than the same vines planted in exposed locations. Plants in locations that are shaded early in the morning may also suffer less cold damage. The amount of sunlight required by vines varies, but most vines grow and flower best in full sunlight to partial shade.

The tolerance of vines to salt water and salt spray is of particular concern to home gardeners living on Florida's coast. Vines can be selected that are adapted to soils and exposures of coastal areas (see “Salt Tolerance” in Table 1).

Poor soil drainage causes the roots of some vines to decay while others are adapted to wet areas. However, even tolerant species are normally nursery-produced in well-drained potting soils and may not withstand the transition to a wet site. The best solution is to correct the drainage problem if possible or to plant the vine on a mound (see below).

Like most plants, vines grow best in a slightly acid (pH 5.5-6.5), loose, well-drained soil. When conditions differ from this, select vines which are adapted rather than amending or changing soil conditions to suit a particular type of vine.

Selecting Vines

As with all plants, the "right plant/right place" rule applies. As you read through Table 1, note which area(s) of the state (north, central, or south) each vine is adapted to. Vines grown in the cooler northern areas of Florida may not be adapted to warmer regions. Conversely, many tropical or subtropical vines grown in south Florida will not survive the winters of north Florida. Others are killed to the ground by frost or freeze, but sprout back from the roots the following spring.

Although Florida is typically divided into three regions (north, central, and south), the limits of each region for a given plant cannot be exactly defined. Local conditions such as elevation, bodies of water, proximity to the coast, and other factors influence temperature. Yearly fluctuations in temperature also complicate determinations.

Choose a vine according to the "function" it will play in your landscape (i.e., screening, softening, color, hummingbird attractor, etc.). Consider planting one or more vines together so that when one finishes blooming, another begins, creating a tapestry of foliage and flowers.

Consider how you will support the vine. Many vines, such as Cross Vine and Trumpet Creeper, will grow as tall as their support will allow. Foliage and flowers often are sparse near the ground and greatest near the uppermost parts of the plants. Flowering can be concentrated at any particular height by providing a "stopping point," or limiting the vertical height of a trellis to the height at which you want the most flowers.

A trellis or other support should be placed several inches away from walls (Figure 11). Such placement allows air movement between wall and vine, reducing humidity and possible mold and mildew growth on surfaces. Vines should be kept off the roof to avoid damage to shingles. Vines can also damage or separate siding if grown on or too close to siding-covered buildings.

Figure 11. 

A trellis or other support should be placed several inches away from walls.


Credit:

Gary Knox, UF/IFAS


[Click thumbnail to enlarge.]

This publication emphasizes flowering vines. Table 2 provides a list of vines grown for their foliage and Table 3 provides a brief list of vines that grow as seasonal annuals.

Some non-native plants in Tables 1-3 have been reviewed for invasiveness using the UF/IFAS Assessment of Non-Native Plants in Florida’s Natural Areas (http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/assessment/). Restrictions in plant use, if any, are noted in the comments. However, many non-native vines have not yet been assessed for potential invasiveness by UF /IFAS and gardeners should be mindful not to let non-native vines escape.

Planting and Care

Planting

Vines can be planted throughout the year in Florida. In north and central Florida, fall and winter planting of cold hardy vines is ideal because plants have time to develop new roots and become established before they resume top growth in the spring. In southern Florida, temperatures are warm enough for year-round planting and growth. However, planting from June through September takes advantage of the rainy season and reduces the amount of irrigation needed to establish plants.

Vines are planted in the same manner as other plants. The planting hole should be dug two to three times the diameter of the root ball and as deep as the root ball is tall. In cases where the soil is hard, compacted, or poorly drained, it may be advisable to dig the planting hole half as deep. Then mound the soil to cover the sides of the root ball. A plant installed in this manner may require more frequent irrigation during dry periods, but it is not likely to suffer from subsurface drainage problems.

Water the vine well while it is still in the pot, and then carefully remove it from the container. Gently place the plant straight in the hole and be sure the top of the root ball is no deeper than the existing soil surface. Fill the hole with the removed native soil. Research has shown that backfilling with organic matter or other amendments is not necessary. Gently firm the soil with your hands; do not pack it with your feet. Water thoroughly. Use the extra backfill soil to construct a saucer-like basin over the root ball. This will help hold water until it drains down to the plant's roots.

Mulching

Vines should be mulched with two to three inches of organic or inorganic material. Mulches insulate the soil and roots, conserve moisture, help control weeds, add organic matter to the soil, and improve the appearance of the landscape.

Recommended organic mulches include leaves, pine needles, bark and wood chips. Inorganic materials like gravel and stone can also be used. Avoid using black plastic around plants which will act as a barrier to water and gas exchange. Woven plastic fabric or other types of porous ground cloth can be used to help stabilize the soil, reduce weed penetration, and conserve moisture. These materials should be covered with a mulch to prevent their degradation by sunlight and to increase the landscape's aesthetic quality.

Keep a one- to three-inch area around the stems of plants free of mulch to decrease the chance of stem rot.

Watering

The success or failure of a planting often depends on whether the plants receive adequate moisture. Vines require months to extend roots into the surrounding soil; therefore, they should be watered frequently until they are well established. Start with daily watering for a week or two, then decrease the frequency to two or three times a week. Gradually reduce watering until the plant appears to be capable of surviving on automatic irrigation or rain alone. Time of year, location in the state, and the landscape, as well as rainfall amounts will influence how frequently vines need water.

Fertilization

Establish a newly planted vine by fertilizing two to three times in the first year or two. One application is normally scheduled around February (south Florida) or March (central and north Florida) and another September (north) or October (central and south). The third application can be made during the summer if needed. If the foliage is green and the plant is flowering well, fertilization can be postponed or eliminated.

The amount of fertilizer to apply will depend on the age and size of the plant. Keep in mind that the roots of most established plants, including vines, extend two to three times beyond the plant. Fertilization may be justified when faster growth is desired or when plants exhibit nutrient deficiencies. Phosphorus content of the fertilizer should be 0-2% P2O5. Historically, the ratio of nitrogen (N) to potassium (K2O) for landscape plants has been in the range of 1:1 to 2:1. An example of a granular landscape fertilizer which fits these criteria is 15-0-15. Due to the prevalence of magnesium (Mg) deficiency on certain landscape plants in many parts of the state, up to 2.5 pounds Mg/1000 ft/year may be applied to address this problem. Micronutrients can be applied at specified rates and timing to achieve fertilization objectives.

Well-established vines often don't require fertilizer. Over-fertilizing induces excessive, aggressive growth, and increases pruning requirements.

Pruning

Vines, by nature, are vigorous plants which will require occasional pruning to keep them in bounds and on their supports. Vines growing up walls should be kept off the roof to avoid damaging shingles.

Flowering vines should be pruned shortly after the blooming period. Later pruning may damage next year's buds and earlier pruning could remove the current season's flowers.

Your county Extension office can provide more information: http://solutionsforyourlife.ufl.edu/map/

References

Some of the information in this fact sheet was previously published as: Vines for Florida by Robert J. Black, retired Professor Emeritus, Environmental Horticulture Department, University of Florida/IFAS, Gainesville.

IFAS Invasive Plant Working Group. 2008. IFAS Assessment of Non-Native Plants in Florida’s Natural Areas. Retrieved 23 September 2013 from http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/assessment/.

Table 1 Thumbnails

Table 1 is best viewed in pdf format. Thumbnails are provided here for convenience:

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Tables

Table 1. 

Vines for Florida. Section of State: S = South Florida; C = Central Florida; N = North Florida; Areas in parentheses ( ) are marginal for that vine. Habit: C = Clinging by roots or tendrils; T = Twining stems; S = Sprawling - Plant has no means of attaching itself; support must be provided.

Scientific Name

Common Name

Section of State

Flower Color

Flower Season

Florida Native

Persistance

Light Requirement

Salt Tolerance

Climbing Habit

Akebia quinata

Five-leaf Akebia,

Chocolate Vine

N

Purple-brown

Spring

No

Evergreen Perennial

Sun

Unknown

T

Notes: Slender twiner with an open growth habit. Adapted only to NW Florida. Vigorous growth, requires pruning. Flowers fragrant, 1" across.

Antigonon leptopus

Coral Vine

(N)CS

Pink

Summer-Fall

No

Evergreen Perennial

Sun

None

C-tendrils

Notes: Profuse bloomer in warm months. White and red forms are available. Attracts hummingbirds. May freeze but recovers rapidly in the spring. Tolerates poor sandy soil. Use with caution – must be managed to prevent escape into natural areas.

Aristolochia littoralis

Calico Flower, Pipevine

(N,C)S

White/purple- brown

Summer-Winter

No

Evergreen Perennial

Sun/Shade

Unknown

T

Notes: Slender, twining stems. Flowers shaped like a pipe. Larval plant for the pipevine and polydamas swallowtail butterflies. Use with caution, can escape cultivation.

Beaumontia grandiflora

Herald's Trumpet

S

White

Early Spring

No

Evergreen Perennial

Sun/Shade

Slight

T

Notes: Massive vine that needs strong support. Large, trumpet-like flowers are fragrant and about 5" long. Leaves may be 9" in length.

Bignonia aequinoctialis

Garlic Vine

(C)S

Lavender pink

Spring-Fall

No

Evergreen Perennial

Sun/Part Shade

Low

C-tendrils

Notes: Flowers 2-3" long, funnelform, in large showy clusters. Foliage has garlic odor when crushed. Sometimes grown on tree trunks.

Bignonia callistegioides

Painted Trumpet

NCS

Lavender with purple streaks

Spring

No

Evergreen Perennial

Sun

Low

C-tendrils

Notes: Glossy, dark green foliage, attractive all year. Flowers abundant in spring, 5" long and trumpet-shaped.

Bignonia capreolata

Cross Vine

NC

Orange-yellow outside

Early Spring

No

Evergreen Perennial

Sun/Shade

Unknown

C-tendrils

Notes: North Florida native. Readily climbs trees with small, adhesive discs on tendrils. Trumpet-shaped flowers are 2" long. Hummingbird attractor. Improved cultivars include: 'Tangerine Beauty' and 'Shalimar Red'.

Bignonia magnifica

Glow Vine

S

Rose-purple

Winter

No

Evergreen Perennial

Sun/Part shade

Unknown

C-tendrils

Notes: Tubular flowers are 2-3" wide, in clusters. Highly ornamental vine attractive at all times. May be trained as a shrub.

Bougainvillea species

Bougainvillea

CS

Red, purple, white, pink or coral

Spring-Fall

No

Evergreen Perennial

Sun

Moderate

T

Notes: Showy, colorful petal-like bracts. Stems thorny. Many cultivars available with different flower colors. Blooms on new growth.

Callaeum macroptera

Butterfly Vine, Brazilian Golden Vine

NCS

Yellow

Spring/Fall

No

Evergreen/ Deciduous perennial

Sun/Shade

Unknown

S

Notes: Yellow, five-petaled flowers are followed by interesting seed pods shaped like butterflies. Deciduous in north Florida.

Callerya reticulata

Evergreen Wisteria

NCS

Purple

Summer

No

Evergreen/ Deciduous perennial

Sun

Unknown

T

Notes: Dark violet, pea-like flowers form in mid-summer. Not a true wistera. Semi-evergreen to deciduous in north Florida.

Campsis grandiflora

Chinese Trumpet Creeper

NC

Orange

Spring-Summer

No

Deciduous Perennial

Sun or Shade

Slight

C-roots

Notes: Asian counterpart to our native Trumpet Creeper (C. radicans), but more refined, less aggressive and less weedy. Deciduous for a short time in late winter. 'Morning Calm' is an approved cultivar with tubular, orange flowers up to 3" wide. Campsis x tagliabuana, Hybrid Trumpet Creeper, is a hybrid of C. radicans and C. grandiflora. 'Madame Galan' is an improved cultivar with 3" tubular, apricot-colored flowers.

Campsis radicans

Trumpet Creeper

NC

Orange-Red

Spring-Summer

Yes

Evergreen Perennial

Sun or Shade

Slight

C

Notes: Native vine that climbs tree trunks readily. Deciduous for short time in late winter. Flowers tubular, to 3" long. Hummingbird attractor. 'Flava' is a yellow cultivar. Suckers from roots and can become weedy.

Clerodendrum × speciosum

Java Glory Vine

(C)S

Red

Spring-Fall

No

Evergreen Perennial

Sun

Slight

T

Notes: A cross between Clerodendron splendens and C. thomsoniae. The showy red flower clusters are set off nicely by the dark-green leaves. The light red calyces persist after the flowers drop and extend the show of color.

Clerodendrum thomsoniae

Bleeding Heart

(C)S

Red and white

Spring-Fall

No

Evergreen Perennial

Part shade

Slight

T

Notes: Flowers in large clusters. White calyx surrounds the scarlet corolla tube. 'Delectum' is a red cultivar; 'Variegata' has variegated leaves.

Clitoria ternatea

Butterfly Pea

(NC)S

Blue, Lavender

Spring-Fall

No

Annual (NC) or weak perennial (CS)

Sun/Part shade

Unknown

T

Notes: Well-behaved vine that blooms lovely deep blue or purple flowers almost year-round. Single and double-flowered forms exist. May die back in winter, but reseeds or rebounds from roots. Not a butterfly attractor; name is derived from shape of flower.

Combretum indicum

Rangoon Creeper

(C)S

White changing to pink then red

Summer

No

Deciduous Perennial

Sun/Shade

Low

T

Notes: Fragrant flowers are 2-3" long, in drooping clusters, change color as they age. Rampant grower with thorny stems. Needs space and strong support.

Combretum rotundifolium

Monkey's Brush

S

Orange-red with yellow

Fall - Late Spring

No

Evergreen Perennial

Sun

Unknown

C-roots

Notes: Vigorous, woody climber suitable for a heavy arbor, trellis or pergola. Flowers are brush-like.

Congea tomentosa

Woolly Congea

(C)S

White to pink bracts

Late Winter

No

Evergreen Perennial

Sun

Moderate

S

Notes: White bracts below flowers fade to pink and persist for several weeks. Attractive, fuzzy foliage. Prune after flowering to keep in bounds.

Cryptostegia grandiflora

Palay Rubber Vine

(C)S

Deep lavender

Summer-Fall

No

Evergreen Perennial

Sun

Moderate

T

Notes: Vigorous. 5" long leaves are dark green, glossy and leathery. Dense growth makes a good screen. Prolific bloomer. Flowers funnel form, to 3".

Dalechampia dioscoraefolia

Bow Tie Vine

(C)S

Fuchsia-colored bracts

Year-round; Peaks in summer

No

Evergreen Perennial

Sun/Part Shade

UnknownT

T

Notes: Vigorous grower and bloomer. Flat violet-pink, serrated bracts with crepe paper texture as wide as 5-6” across. Protect from cold. Blooms best when provided adequate moisture.

Decumaria barbara

Climbing Hydrangea

NC

White

Spring

Yes

Deciduous Perennial

Sun/Part Shade

Unknown

C-roots

Notes: Native deciduous climber with clusters of flowers 4" across. Leaves glossy green. Flowers fragrant. Requires moisture.

Gelsemium sempervirens

Yellow Jessamine

NCS

Yellow

Late Winter-

Early Spring

Yes

Evergreen perennial

Sun/Part Shade

Low

T

Notes: Native vine producing abundant, fragrant flowers. Dark green foliage is not dense. All plant parts are poisonous. Cultivars include 'Butterscotch' (TM), 'Lemon Drop' (PPAF), and the double-flowered 'Pride of Augusta'.

Gloriosa superba

Gloriosa Lily

NCS

Red and yellow-orange

Summer

No

Deciduous Perennial

Sun/Part Shade

Unknown

T

Notes: Twining vine that grasps with tendrils that form at the tips of the leaves. The flower is both spectacular and bizarre in form. Individual vines grow rapidly from a tuber, bloom then die. The vines are sparse and weak and are best combined with another vine or allowed to climb over shrubs. All parts are poisonous.

Holmskioldia sanguinea

Chinese Hat Plant

(N)CS

Orange-red

Summer-Fall

No

Evergreen perennial

Sun/Part Shade

Unknown

S

Notes: Provide support for this clambering vine/shrub which reaches 6'. Crimson petals surrounded by orange to red calyces.

Ipomoea horsfalliae

Cardinal Creeper

S

Rose-purple

Winter

No

Evergreen perennial

Sun

Low

T

Notes: Flowers off and on throughout the year - heaviest in winter. Attractive palmately-divided foliage. 'Briggsii' is a popular cultivar

Jasminum polyanthum

Pink Jasmine

CS

White

Winter

No

Evergreen perennial

Sun/Part Shade

Unknown

T

Notes: Well behaved vine with fine textured pinnate leaves. Clusters of very fragrant white flowers emerge from showy pink buds.

Lablab purpureus subsp. purpureus

Hyacinth Bean, Lablab

N(CS)

Purple

Spring-Fall

No

Annual (CS) or Perennial (N)

Sun/Part Shade

Unknown

T

Notes: This vine is quite showy with its bright purple, fragrant flowers and shiny, flat purple seed pods. Some selections produce young pods and beans which are edible. Caution: dried beans are toxic. Short-lived perennial in south and central Florida; killed to the ground in north Florida, but usually rebounds.

Lonicera sempervirens

Trumpet Honeysuckle

NC

Orange-Scarlet, Yellow inside

Spring-Summer

Yes

Evergreen perennial

Sun/Shade

Moderate

T

Notes: Native to most of the state. The tubular, 2" long flowers are borne in clusters. Does not become a pest like L. japonica, Japanese Honeysuckle.

Mandevilla species and hybrids

Mandevilla

(C)S

Pink, white, red

Spring-Fall

No

Evergreen perennial

Sun

Moderate

T

Notes: M. splendens has rose-pink flowers - 'Alice DuPont' is a popular cultivar; M. boliviensis has white flowers. Long blooming period. Dense foliage is dark green. Flowers are 4" wide and funnelform. Red cultivars include 'Red Velvet' and 'Red Riding Hood'.

Manettia luteorubra

Candy Corn Vine, Brazilian Firecracker Vine

NCS

Red abd Yellow

Summer-Fall

No

Evergreen perennial

Part Shade

Unknown

T

Pandorea jasminoides

Bower Plant

CS

White and pink

Spring-Fall

No

Evergreen perennial

Sun/Part Shade

Low

T

Notes: Funnelform flowers are 1½ to 2" long. Their attractiveness is enhanced by the bright green, dense foliage. 'Southern Belle' is a bushier form; 'Variegata' has attractive green and white leaves.

Passiflora caerulea

Blue Passion Flower

NC

White and purple

Spring-Summer

No

Evergreen perennial

Sun

Low

C-tendrils

Notes: This is the only passion flower that is reliably evergreen in north Florida. Leaves have five lobes. Fruit is edible but of inferior quality. 'Constance Elliot' is a cultivar with white flowers.

Passiflora coccinea

Red Passion Flower

CS

Scarlet

Spring-Summer

No

Evergreen perennial

Sun

Low

C-tendrils

Notes: Rusty-hairy stems with leaves to 6" long and 3" wide, downy beneath. Flowers are 5" across. Fruit of inferior quality. Rapid, dense growth. May be deciduous in north Florida.

Passiflora edulis

Purple Granadilla

(C)S

White and purple

Spring-Summer

No

Evergreen perennial

Sun

Low

C-tendrils

Notes: Glossy, deeply 3-lobed leaves are up to 8" wide. Fragrant flowers are up to 3" wide. Round, 2½" fruit has juicy, edible pulp. Rampant dense growth; manage to prevent escape into natural areas of central and south Florida. Land uses: arbor, fence, trellis. May be deciduous in north Florida

Passiflora incarnata

Passionvine

NCS

White and purple

Spring-Summer

Yes

Evergreen perennial

Sun

Low

C-tendrils

Notes: Native with 3-lobed leaves to 6" wide and dull above. Striking flowers are 2½" wide. Fast and dense growing. Fruit edible but of inferior quality.

Petrea volubilis

Queen's Wreath

CS

Purple, White

Spring-Summer

No N

Evergreen Perennial

Sun/Part Shade

Low

T

Notes: Striking flowers are in drooping 8-12" clusters which resemble Wisteria. Petals fall, leaving the long-lasting calyx. Eight inch long leaves have sand-papery surfaces. 'V. albiflora' has white flowers.

Phaseolus coccineus

Scarlet Runner bean

(N)CS

Red

Late Winter/Spring

No

Annual (N) or perennial (C,S)

Sun

Unknown

T

Notes: Cold hardy in Central and South Florida, but damaged by frosts. Sow seeds in late Fall. Flowers are fragrant and attract hummingbirds. Pods, shelled beans and flowers are edible. Sometimes forms an underground tuber from which plants quickly re-emerge and flower in following years.

Podranea ricasoliana

Ricasol Pandorea

NCS

Light pink striped with red

Spring mainly

No

Evergreen perennial

Sun

Low

T

Notes: Needs full sun to flower profusely. The 2" flowers are funnelform. Vigorous grower once established.

Pseudogynoxys chenopodioides

(syn. Senecio confusus)

Mexican Flame Vine

(C)S

Orange, darkening to reddish-orange

Spring-Summer mainly

No

Evergreen perennial

Sun/Shade

Moderate

T

Notes: Daisy-like flower heads are 1 to 1½" across, borne in terminal clusters. Four-inch leaves are coarsely toothed. Fast grower.

Pyrostegia venusta

Flame Vine

CS

Orange

Winter

No

Deciduous Perennial

Sun

High

C-tendrils

Notes: One of the most spectacular vines, blanketing its support with dense foliage and flowers. Vigorous grower to 80'. Prune hard after flowering to control growth.

Rosa spp. (hybrids and cultivars)

Climbing Roses

NCS

Pink, white, red, yellow

Summer-Fall

No

Deciduous or Evergreen

Sun

Moderate

S

Notes: Climbing roses that have been grown successfully in Florida include: Rosa banksiae (cultivars 'Lutea' and 'Alba'), Rosa laevigata, cultivars 'Crépuscule', 'Fellemberg', 'Maréchal Neil', 'Don Juan, 'Blossomtime', 'Catherine Nelson', 'Spectra'.

Solandra maxima

Chalice Vine

S

Cream, turning to dark yellow

Fall, Winter

No

Evergreen perennial

Part shade

Low

C-roots

Notes: Large flowers, up to 9" long, resemble long-stemmed goblets. They are fragrant at night. Needs a heavy trellis for support.

Solanum laxum

Potato Vine

NCS

White

Spring-Fall

M

Evergreen perennial

Part Shade/Shade

Low

T

Notes: Leaves are shiny, about 3" long, fairly dense. Stems are slender and twining. Star-shaped flowers 1" across, are in clusters. A variegated form exists.

Solanum wendlandii

Costa Rican Nightshade

(N)CS

Lavender-blue

Spring-Summer

No

Evergreen Perennial

Part Shade/Shade

Low

T

Notes: Rampant grower with stout stems and a few thorns. Leaves up to 10" long, also with a few thorns. Large flowers, 2½" across, form showy clusters up to 1' wide.

Stephanotis floribunda

Bridal Bouquet

S

White

Summer

No

Evergreen perennial

Sun/Part shade

Unknown

T

Notes: Fragrant, tubular, waxy flowers 1-2" long are in clusters of 5-8. Four-inch long leaves are thick and glossy. Flowers used for wedding bouquets.

Strongylodon macrobotrys

Jade Vine

S

Blue-green

Spring-Summer

No

Evergreen perennial

Sun/Part shade

Low

T

Notes: Spectacular, claw-shaped flowers in hanging clusters five feet long. Needs sturdy support. Pollinated by bats.

Symphyotrichum carolinianum

Climbing Aster

N C

Lavender

Fall

Yes

Deciduous Perennial

Sun

Unknown

S

Notes: Florida native. Provide support.

Tecomanthe dendrophila

New Guinea Trumpet

Creeper

S

Pink and cream

Summer

No

Evergreen perennial

Sun

Unknown

T

Notes: Deep rose waxy flowers with cream-colored throats are produced on old stems. Handsome palmate leaves and black stems

Tecoma capensis

Cape Honeysuckle

CS

Orange-red

Spring-Winter

No

Evergreen perennial

Sun/Part shade

Moderate to High

T

Notes: Funnelform, 3" long flowers are in elongated racemes. Visited by hummingbirds. Leaves pinnately compound, fine texture. Often a clipped shrub.

Thunbergia alata

Black-eyed Susan Vine

(N)CS

Yellow, orange, white, pink

Late Summer

No

Evergreen Perennial (CS) or Annual (NC)

Sun/Part shade

Unknown

T

Notes: Slender stems and small leaves to 3" give a delicate cover to a trellis. Flowers are 1½" wide and fragrant. Seeds spread by birds so may become weedy. Killed to the ground or completely in North Florida.

Thunbergia battiscombei

Blue Glory

(N)CS

Blue-purple

Year-round

No

Evergreen perennial

Sun

Unknown

S

Notes: Small (4-6'), sprawling plant with glorious blue-purple flowers with yellow throats.

Thunbergia grandiflora

Sky Vine, Bengal Clock Vine

(N)CS

Sky blue

Summer

No

Evergreen perennial

Sun

Low

T

Notes: Extremely vigorous and fast growing; has escaped cultivation in S. Florida; The 3" wide flowers are bell-shaped. Provides lush coverings for walls and fences. Manage to prevent escape into natural areas in C. and S. Florida; usually killed to the ground each winter in N. Florida.

Trachelospermum jasminoides

Confederate Jasmine

NCS

White

Spring

No

Evergreen perennial

Sun/Shade

Moderate

T

Notes: Very fragrant white flowers about ¾" across are borne in great profusion. The dark green leaves are up to 4" long. Will climb tree trunks. 'Pink Showers' is a cultivar with light pink flowers.

Vigna caracalla

Snail Vine

(N)C

White with pink tones

Summer-Fall

No

Evergreen perennial

Sun

Unknown

T

Notes: Vigorous vine that produces fragrant, coiled, 1½ - 2 inch flowers.

Wisteria frutescens

American Wisteria

NC

Blue-violet

Spring

Yes

Deciduous perennial

Sun/Shade

Low

T

Notes: 'Amethyst Falls' cultivar produces purple flowers in spring and sporadically through summer. This native Wisteria is more refined than the well-known Chinese Wisteria which is a rampant invasive plant in Florida and is not recommended.

Table 2. 

Evergreen Vines Grown for Foliage

Cissus species

Grape Ivy

(C)S

Shade

W

C. incisa is salt tolerant.

Epipremum pinnatum

CS

Shade

C

Not to be confused with E. pinnatum cv. Aureum which is invasive.

Fatshedera lizei

Bush Ivy

NCS

Shade

T

Variegated form available

Ficus pumila

Climbing Vine

NCS

Sun/Part Shade

C

Vigorous vine; requires annual trimming once established

Hedera canariensis

Algerian Ivy

N

Shade

C

Large leaves up to 6 inches; often used as a ground cover.

Hedera helix

English Ivy

N

Shade

C

Many cultivars available with different sizes and shapes

Monstera spp.

(C)S

Shade

C

Ripe fruit can be eaten fresh or used in jams and jellies

Philodendron species and hybrids

(C)S

Shade

C

P. 'Autumn', P. goeldii, P. hastatum, P. speciosum

Table 3. 

Flowering Vines Commonly Grown as Annuals

Clitoria ternatea

Butterfly Pea

NCS

Warm-season

May perform as a perennial in central and south Florida - See Table 1. Re-seeds

Ipomoea alba

Moon Flower

NCS

Warm-season

White flowers open at night; fragrant. Native. Re-seeds

Ipomoea lobata

Spanish Flag/

Firecracker Vine

N,C

Warm-season

Medium sized, twining vine to 10-20'. Sun to partial shade. Red-orange flowers summer to fall.

Ipomoea pupurea and I. tricolor and hybrids

Morning Glories

NCS

Warm -season

Flowers open in morning; fade late-afternoon. Pinks, blues, whites.

Ipomoea quamoclit

Cypress Vine

NCS

Warm-season

Delicate foliage; red flowers attract hummingbirds and butterflies. Re-seeds aggressively; manage to prevent escape

Ipomoea sloteri

Cardinal Climber

NCS

Warm-season

Hybrid of I. quamoclit and I. coccinea; hummingbird and butterfly attractor

Lablab purpureus subsp. purpureus Hyacinth Bean

NCS

Warm-season

Show purple flowers and seeds. Often performs as a perennial in north Florida - See Table 1

Lathyrus odoratus

Sweet Peas

NCS

Cool-season

Old-fashioned favorite; cold tolerant but not frost tolerant. Pastel colors

Lophospermum erubescens

Creeping Gloxinia, Climbing Snapdragon

NCS

Cool-season

Red-purple, pink and white. Grows to 8'. Sun. 'Wine Red' is an improved cultivar

Phaseolus coccineus

Scarlet Runner Bean

NCS

Warm-season

Often performs as a perennial in Central and South Florida; edible bean; see Table 1.

Rhodochiton atrosanguineum

Purple Bell Vine

NCS

Cool-season

Purple-black flowera with rose-pink calyces.

Thunbergia alata

Black-eyed Susan Vine

NCS

Warm-season

May grow as a perennial in Central and South FL. Yellow, orange, white, pink cultivars; see Table 1.

Tropaeolum majus

Nasturtiums

NCS

Cool-season

Select vining cultivars; edible flowers and foliage with peppery flavor. Orange, red, and yellow flowers

Footnotes

1.

This document is Circular 860, one of a series of the Environmental Horticulture Department, UF/IFAS Extension. Original publication date April 1990. Revised July 2014. Visit the EDIS website at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu.

2.

Sydney Park Brown, associate professor; Gary W. Knox, professor, Environmental Horticulture Department, UF/IFAS Extension, Gainesville, FL 32611.


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. For more information on obtaining other UF/IFAS Extension publications, contact your county's UF/IFAS Extension office.

U.S. Department of Agriculture, UF/IFAS Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A & M University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating. Nick T. Place, dean for UF/IFAS Extension.