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Introduction to the Sugar Policy Series1

Jose Alvarez and Leo C. Polopolus2

The sugar policy series discusses policy issues facing the U.S. sweetener industry in general and Florida's sweetener industry in particular. From both a domestic and an international perspective, the industry is at a crucial point. Although no major changes have been made to the sugar program in the last Farm Bills, sugar has continued to be one of the most controversial commodities during the debates in the U.S. Congress. The final results of the Uruguay Round of the Generalized Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT), approved in December 1993, took effect in July 1995. The signed agreement contained reductions on tariff and non-tariff barriers as a starting point for trade liberalization. GATT's successor, the World Trade Organization (WTO), is working for freer trade. However, very little has been done in the area of subsidy reductions. In addition, the United States and most of the developed world have experienced a tremendous growth in competitive products, including both natural and artificial sweeteners. These complex domestic and international policy issues, combined with increased competition from other products, has transformed the previous sugar market into a sweetener market. This series is intended to keep the interested reader informed and updated on major aspects of domestic and international changes in sweetener policy.

Sugar Policy series

Currently available

Introduction to the Sugar Policy series

The History of U.S. Sugar Protection

The Sugar Program: Description and Debate

The Florida Sugar Industry

Archived, available in University of Florida Digital Collections

Domestic and International Competition in Sugar Markets

Sugar and the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade

Sugar and the North American Free Trade Agreement

Sugar and the World Trade Organization (WTO): Major Issues

Sugar and the World Trade Organization (WTO): Progress To-Date

Footnotes

1.

This is EDIS document SC 018, a publication of the Department of Food and Resource Economics, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL. First published May 1991; revised May 2012. This publication is also part of the Florida Sugarcane Handbook, an electronic publication of the Department of Agronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL. For more information, contact the editor of the Sugarcane Handbook, Ronald W. Rice (rwr@ufl.edu). Please visit the EDIS website at http://EDIS.ifas.ufl.edu.

2.

Jose Alvarez, Professor, Department of Food and Resource Economics, Everglades Research and Education Center, Belle Glade, FL; and Leo C. Polopolus, Professor Emeritus, Department of Food and Resource Economics, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611.


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. For more information on obtaining other UF/IFAS Extension publications, contact your county's UF/IFAS Extension office.

U.S. Department of Agriculture, UF/IFAS Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A & M University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating. Nick T. Place, dean for UF/IFAS Extension.