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Publication #FAR1705

Homework1

Diana Converse2

Figure 1. 
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Homework is an important part of your children's education, according to the National Education Association. Meaningful homework can help students do better in school, especially as they get into the upper grades. Homework teaches children responsibility, as well as how to follow directions, manage time, begin and complete a task, work on their own, and practice what they're learning in class. However, most children would much rather be playing or doing other things than homework. Many parents and children struggle over when, where, and how homework will be done.

At times parents may feel that it would be easier just to do the work for their children. However, the National Parent and Teacher Association advises parents to let children do homework themselves. You may need to sit with elementary-school-age children and walk them through the process of how to study, help them organize the materials they need, and make sure they've completed all their tasks. As you do this, you are laying the foundation for good study habits.

Parents can offer to help check homework, but helping is very different from taking over. You can also reinforce good habits by helping your child find a regular place to work and a regular time of day to do homework. Instead of asking if your child has homework every night, always assume that there is homework, reading, or studying of some kind to be done.

Listening, learning, and living together: it's the science of life. "Family Album" is a co-production of University of Florida IFAS Extension, the Department of Family, Youth and Community Sciences, and of WUFT-FM. If you'd like to learn more, please visit our website at http://www.familyalbumradio.org.

To listen to the radio broadcast:

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Footnotes

1.

This document is FAR1705, one of a series of the Family Youth and Community Sciences Department, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida. Broadcast as program 111 and published December 2007. Reviewed March 2012. In the interest of time and/or clarity, the broadcast version of this script may have been modified. Visit the EDIS website at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu.

2.

Diana Converse, Extension agent III, Hillsborough County, Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611.


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. For more information on obtaining other UF/IFAS Extension publications, contact your county's UF/IFAS Extension office.

U.S. Department of Agriculture, UF/IFAS Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A & M University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating. Nick T. Place, dean for UF/IFAS Extension.