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Publication #FCS8269

Selecting, Preparing, and Canning: Syrups 1

United States Department of Agriculture, Extension Service2

Figure 1. 
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Adding syrup to canned fruit helps to retain its flavor, color, and shape. It does not prevent spoilage of these foods. The guidelines for preparing and using syrups (Table 1) offer a new "very light" syrup, which approximates the natural sugar content of many fruits. The sugar content in each of the five syrups is increased by about 10 percent. Quantities of water and sugar to make enough syrup for a canner load of pints or quarts are provided for each syrup type.

Procedure: Heat water and sugar together. Bring to a boil and pour over raw fruits in jars. For hot packs, bring water and sugar to boil, add fruit, reheat to boil, and fill into jars immediately.

Other sweeteners: Light corn syrups or mild-flavored honey may be used to replace up to half the table sugar called for in syrups. For more information see "Canned Foods for Special Diets," (FCS 8265).

Tables

Table 1. 

Preparing and using syrups.

Syrup Type

Approx. % Sugar

Measures of Water and Sugar

Fruits Commonly packed in syrup**

For 9-Pt Load*

For 7-Qt Load

Cups Water

Cups Sugar

Cups Water

Cups Sugar

Very Light

10

6-1/2

3/4

10-1/2

1-1/4

Approximates natural sugar levels in most fruits and adds the fewest calories.

Light

20

5-3/4

1-1/2

9

2-1/4

Very sweet fruit. Try a small amount the first time to see if your family likes it.

Medium

30

5-1/4

2-1/4

8-1/4

3-3/4

Sweet apples, sweet cherries, berries, grapes.

Heavy

40

5

3-1/4

7-3/4

5-1/4

Tart apples, apricots, sour cherries, gooseberries, nectarines, peaches, pears, plums.

Very Heavy

50

4-1/4

4-1/4

6-1/2

6-3/4

Very sour fruit. Try a small amount the first time to see if your family likes it.

*This amount is also adequate for a 4-quart load.

**Many fruits that are typically packed in heavy syrup are excellent and tasteful products when packed in lighter syrups. It is recommended that lighter syrups be tried, since they contain fewer calories from added sugar.

Footnotes

1.

This document is FCS 8269, a series of the Department of Family, Youth and Community Sciences, UF/IFAS Extension. Publication date: May 2003. Reviewed: February 2014.. This document was extracted from the Complete Guide to Home Canning, Agriculture Information Bulletin No. 539, USDA. It was originally published on CD-ROM as part of HE 8148, Guide 2: Selecting, Preparing, and Canning Fruit and Fruit Products. Please visit the EDIS website at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu

2.

Reviewed for use in Florida by Amy Simonne, assistant professor, Food Safety and Quality, Department of Family, Youth and Community Sciences, UF/IFAS Extension, Gainesville FL 32611.


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. For more information on obtaining other UF/IFAS Extension publications, contact your county's UF/IFAS Extension office.

U.S. Department of Agriculture, UF/IFAS Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A & M University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating. Nick T. Place, dean for UF/IFAS Extension.