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Publication #4HDAR01

Florida 4-H Dairy Record Book1

Karen Hamilton, Chris Decubellis, Chris Holcomb, and Sarah Hensley2

Dairy and Dairy Goat Project Record Book (4H DAR 01) is an animal sciences publication suggested for 4-H members age 8 and up. This record book is a tool to guide youth in keeping an accurate record of their expenses and other important records pertaining to dairy cattle or dairy goats.

In EDIS this publication is DLN 4H 054.

This publication is best viewed as a PDF.

Visit the 4-H Youth Development Curriculum website for more information on related project material.

Click Here to print or view the entire project.

Florida 4-H Dairy Record Book

Table 1. 

Name:

Parent’s Name:

Mailing Address:

City: State: Zip Code:

Age: Jr., Int., Sr.: Date of Birth (mm/dd/yyyy):

Grade in School: School Name:

Name of 4-H Club:

Name of 4-H Club Leader:

Name of 4-H Agent:

County:

I hereby certify that, as the owner of this project, I have personally been responsible for the care of this (these) animal(s), kept records on this project, and completed this record book.

_____________________________________________________________________________

Member's Signature Date

I/We, the parent(s), certify that my/our child has completed this project and this record book.

______________________________________________________________________________

Parent/Guardian Signature Date

I certify that the above-named individual is an active member of the _______________________ 4-H Club in ____________________ County. I verify that this record book has been completed by the student and is an accurate representation of the project.

______________________________________________________________________________

4-H Club Leader Signature Date

_______________________________________________________________________________

4-H County Extension Agent Signature Date

General Information

Your 4-H Dairy Project

This project record will help you and others see what you have learned about your dairy project animal(s). It will also serve as a way to teach others how to develop an outstanding project.

Primary Objectives of the Dairy Project:

  • Become aware of the scope and economic significance of the dairy industry.

  • Acquire skills in dairy production through ownership and care of dairy animals.

  • Learn marketing, processing, distribution, and use of dairy products.

  • Learn and practice principles of cleanliness and sanitation as applied to the production and care of dairy products.

  • Learn the nutritive value of dairy products and promote their use.

  • Appreciate contributions and applications of scientific research to the dairy industry.

  • Develop sportsmanship, cooperation, decision-making, and public speaking skills through participation in demonstrations, tours, judging, and/or exhibits.

To find additional resources to help you with your project, visit http://www.4-h.org/resource-library/curriculum/.

The Dairy Cattle Skills for Life series is a set of three levels of project guides that are filled with activities and information that can help you increase your knowledge of dairy cattle. These include Cowabunga!, Mooving Ahead, and Rising to the Top.

Also visit http://articles.extension.org/mediawiki/files/1/13/Monitoring_Dairy_Heifer_Growth.pdf for Monitoring Dairy Heifer Growth, an excellent publication from Penn State University.

The Dairy Goat Skills for Life series is a set of three levels of project guides that are filled with activities and information that can help you increase your knowledge of dairy goats. These include Getting Your Goat, Stepping Out, and Showing the Way.

***Note: Make additional copies of pages as you need them***

Individual Animal Identification

Breed:

Birthdate:

Tattoo:

Registration Number:

Ear Tag Number:

Date Acquired:

Name of Breeder or Previous Owner:

Address of Breeder or Previous Owner:

Table 2. 

Picture of Dairy Animal

Right Side Photo

Frontal Photo

Left Side Photo

     

Insert photos or outline drawings of your dairy animal.

Make copies of this page as necessary.

Pedigree

Enter the name and registration number. Make copies of this page as necessary.

Growth Record Summary

Fill this out monthly to keep track of your animal’s growth; use growth charts (Appendix A) for the appropriate breed to compare your animal’s breed recommendations.

Table 3. 

Age (months)

Weight (pounds)

Height at Withers (inches)

Heart Girth (inches)

1

     

2

     

3

     

4

     

5

     

6

     

7

     

8

     

9

     

10

     

11

     

12

     

13

     

14

     

15

     

16

     

17

     

18

     

19

     

20

     

21

     

22

     

23

     

24

     

Dairy Heifer Growth Chart

Use this chart to keep track of your heifer's growth and compare to her breed average.

Use this information to make a decision on an appropriate time to breed your heifer

Progeny Record

Animal Inventory

Table 5. 

Animal Name or Number

Sex

Birthdate

Breed

Beginning Value

Ending Value

Comments

Change in Value

             

$

             

$

             

$

             

$

             

$

             

$

             

$

             

$

             

$

             

$

             

$

             

$

             

$

             

$

Totals

     

$

$

 

$

  • To calculate the Change in Value, subtract the Beginning Value from the Ending Value.

  • To calculate the Total Beginning Value, add all the numbers in the Beginning Value column.

  • To calculate the Total Ending Value, add all the numbers in the Ending Value column.

  • To calculate the Total Change in Value, add all the numbers in the Change in Value column.

  • Animals that are purchased during the project will be recorded as a non-feed expense.

  • The beginning inventory value will be blank on this page.

  • Enter the ending value for all animals in the project at the end of the year.

  • Note born, purchased, sold, or deceased animals in the Comments column.

Equipment Inventory

Table 6. 

Equipment Description

Date Acquired

Quantity

Purchase Cost or Value

Beginning Value

Depreciation

Ending Value

             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
 

Totals

$

 

$

To calculate the total, add all the values that correspond to that column.

Refer to Appendix C for information on Depreciation.

Veterinary and Health Expenses

To calculate the total, add all the values that correspond to the Costs column.

Breeding Record and Expenses

Table 8. 

Service Sire

Female Bred

 

Breed

Name

Reg. No.

Breed

Name

Reg. No.

Date Bred

Due Date

Description of Breeding Supplies

Cost

                   
                   
                   
                   
                   
                   
                   
                   
                   
                   
                   
                   
                   
                   
                   
                   
 

Total Breeding Cost

$

Feed Record

Table 9. 

Month

Milk or Replacer

Concentrate Mix

Hay

Other Feeds

Date Feed Weighed

 

Pounds

Value

Pounds

Value

Pounds

Value

Pounds

Value

 
                   
                   
                   
                   
                   
                   
                   
                   
                   
                   
                   

Totals

 

$

 

$

 

$

 

$

 

Year's Total Feed Expense

$

To calculate the total, add all the values that correspond to that column.

Ration Record

Refer to your feed label for the information to complete this page.

Milk or Milk Replacer

% Protein:

% Fat:

Main Ingredient:

Medicated (Yes or No):

Cost per Pound:

Feed (Concentrate Mix)

% Protein:

% Fat:

Main Ingredient:

Medicated (Yes or No):

Cost per Pound:

Juniors: Complete one Feed Records page for all animals by month. For cows kept at a dairy, write the exchange value of milk for feed.

Intermediates: Complete one Feed Records page per animal group (Calves, Heifers, Cows). For cows kept at a dairy, write the exchange value of milk for feed.

Seniors: Complete one Feed Records page per animal group (Calves, Heifers, Cows). For cows kept at a dairy, determine average feed values.

Weigh feed one day each month. Calculate pounds consumed and total value of feed consumed per month.

Refer to Appendix B to complete Feed Records.

Lactation Record

Animal Name or Number:

Registration or Ear Tag Number:

Breed:

Date of Birth:

Freshening Date:

What was Florida’s average mailbox price for the most recent year (look up on the internet)? $

To calculate the total, add all the values that correspond to the Value of Milk column.

Make copies of this page as needed.

*Not required. Only fill in if information is available from the dairy.

Show Receipts and Expenses

Table 11. 

Date

Name of Event

Show Receipts (Premiums)

Show Expenses (travel, food, lodging, entry fees, etc.)

Comments (include notable events, e.g., 2nd place fitting and grooming contest)

         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         

Total Income

$

Total Expenses

$

To calculate the total, add all the values that correspond to that column.

Non-Feed Expenses

Table 12. 

Date Purchased

Description

Value

     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     

Total Non-Feed Expenses

$

  1. To calculate the total, add all the values that correspond to the Value column.

  2. Include all expenses NOT already reported in another record. This should include animals purchased during the project year and other expendable items

Labor Record

Table 13. 

Month

Fitting & Grooming

Showmanship

Feeding

Health Breeding

Milking

Maintenance

Total

               
               
               
               
               
               
               
               
               
               
               
               
               
               
 

Annual Labor Hours

 
 

Current Minimum Wage

 
 

Value of Labor

 

  • To calculate the total, add all the values of the row that corresponds to that month.

  • To calculate Annual Labor Hours, add all the values in the Total column.

  • Include an estimate of the time spent each month on each of the labor activities listed.

Animals Sold

Table 14. 

Date

Name(s) or Number(s) of Animal(s) Sold

Amount Received

     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
 

Total Received

$

  • To calculate the Total Received, add all the values that correspond to the Amount Received column.

  • Animals sold should have a value of 0 on your ending inventory.

Other Income

Table 15. 

Date

Description

Amount Received

     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
 

Total Received

$

  • To calculate the Total Received, add all the values that correspond to the Amount Received column.

  • Record any money given to you to support your project by sponsors, parents, etc.

Financial Summary

Expenses

Beginning Animal Inventory:

Beginning Equipment Inventory:

Veterinary and Health Costs:

Breeding Costs:

Feed Costs for ALL Animals:

Show Expenses:

Non-Feed Expenses:

Total Expenses:

Receipts

Ending Animal Inventory:

Ending Equipment Inventory:

Show Receipts:

Value of Milk Produced:

Value of Animals Sold:

Other Income:

Total Receipts:

Profit/Loss:

Total Receipts - Total Expenses =

Project Activities

Table 16. 

Date

Activity

Level

Number of Times Attended

Comments (Ranking, Placing, Accomplishment)

         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         

  • List the demonstrations, talks, exhibits, newspaper articles, tours, workshops, camps, judging events, and field trips that were a part of your dairy project experience.

  • Level: Club, County, District, State, Regional, or National

Citizenship and Community Service

Table 17. 

Date

Activity

Level*

Number of Times Attended

Comments

         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         

  • List your citizenship and community service accomplishments.

  • Level: Club, County, District, State, Regional, or National.

Leadership Accomplishments

Table 18. 

Date

Responsibility

Level*

Number of Times Attended

Comments

         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         

  • Enter any leadership responsibilities you had during this project (e.g., committee assignments, officer positions, leading group activities, etc.)

  • Level: Club, County, District, State, Regional, or National.

What skills and knowledge have you gained from this project?

  • Be specific when listing skills and knowledge gained.

  • For example, instead of writing “sportsmanship,” write “learned types of questions judges ask during sportsmanship and researched answers.”

Project Pictures

Pictures should show the beginning and end of your project as well as skills you learned. There should be five to eight pictures. Include a caption with each photo. The caption should tell a story and explain what you are doing and why you are doing the things shown in the photo. Pay attention to spelling and grammar.

Project Story

Write an essay about your dairy project experience.

Juniors write a minimum of 100 words. Intermediates write a minimum of 150 words. Seniors write a minimum of 250 words.

Ideas to help you:

  • What have you learned?

  • What safety practices have you used in your project?

  • How have you managed your project?

  • What can you do to improve your project next year?

  • What did you do to make the best better?

  • What goals did you have and how did you accomplish them?

  • What workshops or clinics have you attended and what did you learn?

  • How can the experiences you have had in this project help you in the future?

Appendix A: Growth Charts

Table 19. 

Suggested Weights and Heights for Breeding Age Heifers

Breed

Body Weight

(pounds)

Wither Height

(inches)

Hip Height

(inches)

Jersey

525‒575

43‒45

45‒47

Ayrshire

700‒750

46‒48

48‒50

Guernsey

700‒750

46‒49

48‒51

Milking Shorthorn

750‒800

46‒48

48‒50

Holstein

750‒800

48‒50

50‒52

Brown Swiss

750‒800

48‒51

50‒53

Chart from "Monitoring Dairy Heifer Growth" Penn State College of Agricultural Sciences.

Table 20. 

Range of Recommended Jersey Heifer Weights and Height

Age

(months)

Weight

(pounds)

Height

(inches)

1

93‒108

29‒32

2

122‒146

30‒33

3

155‒177

32‒34

4

183‒217

34‒36

5

233‒278

35‒38

6

259‒321

36‒39

7

303‒362

38‒40

8

335‒412

39‒41

9

373‒436

40‒42

10

391‒483

40‒42

11

428‒499

41‒43

12

471‒548

42‒44

13

500‒571

43‒45

14

535‒602

44‒45

15

565‒640

44‒46

16

583‒661

45‒46

17

609‒696

45‒47

18

639‒753

45‒47

19

651‒769

46‒47

20

698‒813

46‒48

21

719‒827

47‒48

22

758‒860

47‒49

23

760‒878

48‒49

24

790‒893

48‒50

Chart from "Monitoring Dairy Heifer Growth" Penn State College of Agricultural Sciences.

Table 21. 

Range of Recommended Holstein Heifer Weights and Heights

Age

(months)

Weight

(pounds)

Height

(inches)

1

130‒135

31‒33

2

177‒189

33‒35

3

226‒244

35‒37

4

275‒299

36‒39

5

323‒354

38‒40

6

372‒408

39‒42

7

420‒463

41‒43

8

469‒518

42‒45

9

518‒572

43‒46

10

566‒627

44‒47

11

615‒682

45‒48

12

664‒737

46‒49

13

712‒791

47‒49

14

761‒846

47‒50

15

858‒956

49‒51

16

858‒956

49‒51

17

931‒1026

50‒52

18

956‒1065

50‒52

19

1007‒1086

50‒52

20

1053‒1174

51‒53

21

1086‒1191

51‒54

22

1150‒1284

51‒55

23

1279‒1300

52‒57

24

1247‒1393

52‒57

Chart from "Monitoring Dairy Heifer Growth" Penn State College of Agricultural Sciences.

Table 22. 

Range of Recommended Guernsey Heifer Weights and Heights

Age

(months)

Weight

(pounds)

Height

(inches)

1

122‒143

31‒33

2

166‒193

33‒35

3

203‒233

35‒37

4

255‒299

37‒38

5

299‒354

38‒41

6

366‒434

40‒42

7

384‒448

41‒43

8

433‒503

42‒44

9

482‒568

43‒47

10

511‒588

44‒46

11

574‒662

45‒47

12

576‒674

46‒48

13

643‒756

46‒48

14

696‒803

47‒49

15

740‒866

48‒50

16

779‒899

49‒51

17

830‒950

50‒52

18

864‒1001

50‒52

19

900‒1015

51‒52

20

914‒1046

51‒53

21

967‒1112

51‒53

22

996‒1123

52‒54

23

1025‒1177

52‒54

24

1026‒1178

52‒55

Chart from "Monitoring Dairy Heifer Growth" Penn State College of Agricultural Sciences.

Table 23. 

Range of Recommended Ayrshire Heifer Weights and Heights

Age

(months)

Weight

(pounds)

Height

(inches)

1

131‒154

31‒32

2

177‒205

32‒34

3

223‒256

34‒36

4

269‒307

36‒38

5

315‒357

37‒39

6

360‒407

39‒41

7

405‒457

40‒42

8

450‒506

41‒43

9

494‒554

42‒44

10

538‒602

43‒45

11

581‒650

44‒46

12

624‒697

45‒47

13

666‒743

46‒48

14

707‒789

46‒48

15

748‒834

47‒49

16

787‒878

48‒49

17

826‒922

48‒50

18

864‒965

48‒50

19

901‒1007

49‒50

20

937‒1049

49‒51

21

972‒1089

49‒51

22

1006‒1129

50‒52

23

1039‒1168

50‒52

24

1070‒1206

50‒52

25

1101‒1244

51‒53

Chart from "Monitoring Dairy Heifer Growth" Penn State College of Agricultural Sciences.

Table 24. 

Range of Recommended Brown Swiss Heifer Weights and Heights

Age

(months)

Weight

(pounds)

Height

(inches)

1

134‒163

32‒34

2

187‒223

34‒36

3

240‒283

36‒38

4

293‒343

37‒40

5

345‒403

39‒42

6

396‒462

40‒44

7

447‒521

42‒45

8

498‒580

43‒46

9

548‒637

44‒48

10

597‒694

45‒49

11

645‒750

46‒50

12

693‒805

47‒51

13

739‒859

48‒52

14

785‒912

49‒52

15

829‒963

49‒53

16

872‒1013

50‒54

17

914‒1061

50‒54

18

955‒1107

51‒55

19

994‒1152

51‒55

20

1032‒1194

52‒56

21

1068‒1235

52‒56

22

1103‒1273

52‒56

23

1136‒1309

53‒57

24

1167‒1343

53‒57

25

1197‒1374

53‒57

Chart from "Monitoring Dairy Heifer Growth" Penn State College of Agricultural Sciences.

Table 25. 

Range of Recommended Milking Shorthorn Heifer Weights and Heights

Age

(months)

Weight

(pounds)

Height

(inches)

1

128‒160

31‒32

2

175‒210

33‒34

3

223‒262

34‒36

4

272‒315

36‒38

5

320‒370

37‒39

6

369‒425

37‒41

7

418‒482

40‒42

8

467‒539

41‒43

9

515‒596

42‒44

10

564‒653

43‒45

11

611‒709

44‒46

12

658‒765

45‒47

13

705‒820

46‒47

14

750‒874

46‒48

15

794‒926

47‒49

16

838‒977

47‒49

17

880‒1025

48‒50

18

920‒1071

48‒50

19

959‒1115

49‒50

20

997‒1155

49‒51

21

1033‒1192

49‒51

22

1066‒1226

50‒51

23

1098‒1256

50‒52

24

1128‒1281

50‒52

25

1155‒1303

51‒52

Chart from "Monitoring Dairy Heifer Growth" Penn State College of Agricultural Sciences.

Appendix B: Feed Records

Use the following information to help you complete your Feed Records page.

POUNDS OF FEED: This value represents the pounds of feed consumed by one animal on the date the feed was weighed, multiplied by the number of days in the month.

Example: 5 pounds of concentrate mix were weighed and consumed on March 5.

5 pounds x 31 days = 155 pounds of concentrate consumed in March

VALUE OF FEED: This figure represents the average total value of pounds of feed consumed per animal per month.

Example: If the feed cost $14.00/50 pounds, and you fed 155 pounds, you would calculate the value of the feed as follows.

($14.00 x 155 lbs.)/50 lbs. = $43.40

OR

($14.00/50 lbs.) = $0.28/lb. x 155 lbs. = $43.40

DATE FEED WEIGHED: Select a day each month to weigh the pounds of the different types of feed consumed by your animal(s) and record this date in the appropriate column.

YEAR'S TOTAL FEED EXPENSE: This figure represents the sum of the columns of pounds of feed consumed per month and the value of the feed consumed per month.

PRICE USED PER POUND OF FEED: This figure should represent the price per pound of feed used when calculating the value of each feed ingredient.

Example: If feed costs $14.00/50 lbs., the cost is $0.28/lb.

Appendix C: Depreciation

Depreciation is the annual reduction in value of an item due to use, wear, age, or a combination of these factors. For an item to be depreciable, it must be owned, have a useful life greater than one year, have a finite and determinable life, and have productive use in the business. In agriculture, examples of depreciable items are buildings, vehicles, machinery, equipment, fences, other land improvements, and breeding livestock. Items that are not depreciable are real estate, market livestock, crop inventories, and supplies.

Calculating depreciation is a simple process; however, it becomes complicated because items depreciate at different rates depending on use, condition, and other factors.

For Juniors

When calculating depreciation, you will use a 10% per year depreciation of the original purchase cost for the items you will still have at the end of the project. This includes items you had at the beginning of the project as well as items purchased during the current calendar year.

Example: If you purchased a grooming chute for $800.00, the value of that chute would be 10% less at the end of the year.

$800.00 x 0.1 = $80.00

The beginning value is $800.00 and the ending value is $720.00.

$800.00 – $80.00 = $720.00

For each year you own this grooming chute, it will depreciate by $80.00.

For Intermediates and Seniors

There are three common methods of depreciation: straight line, declining balance, and sum-of-year's digits. For your record book purposes, you will use straight line depreciation. This method gives you a constant depreciation value for each year. The formula is:

(Original Cost - Salvage Value)/Useful Life

Some terms to know:

Original Cost: The price paid for the item.

Salvage Value: Expected market value of the item at the end of 5 years.

Useful Life: Number of years the item is expected to be used.

What is an item’s useful life?

5 years: Vehicles, purchased breeding cattle, computers

7 years: Most farm machinery and equipment, fences

10 years: Single-purpose structures

20 years: General purpose buildings

Example: If you purchased a grooming chute for $800.00 with a salvage value of $400.00 and a useful life of 7 years, you would calculate the depreciation as follows.

($800.00 – $400.00)/7 years = $57.14/year

With straight line depreciation the annual depreciation for the grooming chute would be $57.14 each year.

Tables

Table 4. 

Dam Name or Number

Sire Name or Number

Freshening Date

Progeny Sex

Birth Weight

Progeny ID Tag/Tattoo/EID

Progeny Name or Number

             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
Table 7. 

Date

Animal Name or Number

Expense (medicine, testing, vet, etc.)

Cost

       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
 

Total Health Expenses

$

Table 10. 

Month

Avg. Daily Milk Produced (lbs.)

% Fat*

Lbs. Fat*

% Protein*

Lbs. Protein*

Value of Milk

             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
 

Total Milk Value:

$

Footnotes

1.

This document is 4HDAR01, one of a series of the 4-H Youth Development, UF/IFAS Extension. Original publication date November 1999. Revised October 2018. Visit the EDIS website at https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu for the currently supported version of this publication.

2.

Karen Hamilton, volunteer; Chris Decubellis, SSA.; Chris Holcomb, volunteer; and Sarah Hensley, SSA; UF/IFAS Extension 4-H Youth Development Program, Gainesville, FL 32611.


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. For more information on obtaining other UF/IFAS Extension publications, contact your county's UF/IFAS Extension office.

U.S. Department of Agriculture, UF/IFAS Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A & M University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating. Nick T. Place, dean for UF/IFAS Extension.