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Cost of Production for Processed Oranges Grown in Southwest Florida, 2015/16

oranges on the tree with orchard in background

This 4-page fact sheet written by Ariel Singerman and published by the Department of Food and Resource Economics presents the cost of production per acre for processed oranges in southwest Florida during 2015/16. Thirteen growers participated in the survey and provided annual, per-acre costs by program for a “typical” irrigated, mature grove (10+ years old), including resets. The number of acres managed by their combined operations accounts for approximately 41,000 acres, of an estimated 257,298 acres devoted to oranges in the area, so the sample represents 16% of the acreage devoted to oranges in that region. Typical users of the estimates in this publication include growers, consultants, property appraisers, and researchers.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe1007

New Featured Creatures: January and February 2017

Cost of Production for Processed Oranges Grown in Central Florida (Ridge), 2015/16

Orange grove.

This 4-page fact sheet written by Ariel Singerman and published by the Department of Food and Resource Economics presents the cost of production per acre for processed oranges in central Florida during 2015/16. Five growers participated in the survey and provided annual, per-acre costs by program for a “typical” irrigated, mature grove (10+ years old), including resets. The number of acres managed by their combined operations accounts for approximately 29,000 acres, of an estimated 137,154 acres devoted to oranges in the area, so the sample represents 21% of the acreage devoted to oranges in that region. Typical users of the estimates in this publication include growers, consultants, property appraisers, and researchers.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe1006

An Overview of the Grapefruit Market in South Korea

grapefruit, USDA photo

According to the Foreign Agricultural Service of the United States Department of Agriculture, worldwide consumption of fresh grapefruit in 2014/15 increased from 4.2 million to 5.2 million metric tons. China, which is the largest producer of grapefruit, was largely responsible for the increase. In South Korea, however, the state of Florida in the United States has traditionally dominated the grapefruit market. The South Korean grapefruit market has been increasing in recent years and is expected to keep growing. The industry in Florida now faces fierce competition from other suppliers with lower import prices and different harvest seasons. This 5-page fact sheet written by Yan Heng, Hyeyoung Kim, and Lisa House and published by the Food and Resource Economics Department aims to provide an overview of the grapefruit market in South Korea and evaluate the potential of this market for Florida fresh grapefruit producers.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe1003

The Laccate Ganoderma of the Southeastern United States: A Cosmopolitan and Important Genus of Wood Decay Fungi

Figure 3. Range of context tissue characters of the laccate Ganoderma spp. A) Cream-colored context tissue with concentric growth zones typical of G. sessile, illustrating the location of specific basidiocarp tissues; B) Dark brown colored context tissue with concentric growth zones (arrow) of G. tuberculosum; C) All white, homogenous context tissue of G. tsugae; D) Cream-colored context tissue with black, shiny resinous bands (arrow) typical of G. curtisii. Credits: Andrew Loyd, UF/IFAS

Ganoderma Karst. is a large and diverse genus of wood decay fungi that can rot the roots and/or lower trunk of many tree species. There are several laccate (varnished or polished) Ganoderma species that are found in the southeastern United States and this six-page fact sheet provides an overview of the different species. Written by Andrew L. Loyd, Jason A. Smith, Brantlee S. Richter, Robert A. Blanchette, and Matthew E. Smith and published by the Plant Pathology Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pp333

Hazardous Household Substances: Alternatives That Are Relatively Free of Toxic Effects

Some products that we use in our homes contain chemicals that are hazardous or toxic. We can reduce the potential for exposure to chemicals from household products and produce less hazardous household waste by using alternatives that are relatively free of toxic effects. This six-page fact sheet describes some alternatives that are relatively free of toxic effects. Written by Marie Hammer, Chris Koehler, and Randall Cantrell and published by the Department of Family, Youth and Community Sciences.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/he791

Effective Practice for Building Cross Sector Partnerships

colorful people around a table

This four-page article outlines a practical framework built upon best practices that can be used by those considering the development of cross sector partnerships to address environmental and social issues.Written by John M. Diaz and published by the Department of Agricultural Education and Communication.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc271

Building for Birds Evaluation Tool: Breeding and Wintering Habitat for Forest Birds

A woodpecker on an oak tree.  UF/IFAS Photo: Thomas Wright.

Several bird species use forest fragments and trees conserved in built areas as breeding, wintering, and stopover habitat. Scientists have created a Building for Birds online tool to help these birds and the people who appreciate them. This evaluation tool is most useful for small developments or developments in already fragmented landscapes.

The tool is designed for use when no opportunity is available to conserve large forest areas of 125 acres or more within a proposed development. Developers are sometimes reluctant to conserve trees and forest fragments in subdivided residential/commercial areas because it costs time and money, but there is value in this conservation effort not only for many different species of forest birds, but for future homeowners waking to birdsong in the mornings.

This 17-page fact sheet written by Mark Hostetler and Jan-Michael Archer and published by the Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation describes the online tool and shows how it can help preserve breeding and wintering habitat for migrating birds.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw417

Building for Birds Evaluation Tool: Forest Fragments Used as Stopover Sites by Migrant Birds

Western meadowlark perched on a fence post near Ona, Florida. UF/IFAS Photo by Tyler Jones.

Several bird species use forest fragments and trees conserved in built areas as breeding, wintering, and stopover habitat. Scientists have created a Building for Birds online tool to help these birds and the people who appreciate them. This evaluation tool is most useful for small developments or developments in already fragmented landscapes.

The tool is designed for use when no opportunity is available to conserve large forest areas of 125 acres or more within a proposed development. Developers are sometimes reluctant to conserve trees and forest fragments in subdivided residential/commercial areas because it costs time and money, but there is value in this conservation effort not only for many different species of forest birds, but for future homeowners waking to birdsong in the mornings.

This 18-page fact sheet written by Mark Hostetler and Jan-Michael Archer and published by the Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation describes the online tool and shows how it can help preserve stopover habitat for migrating birds.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw416

Manejo de Insectos en Cruciferas (Cultivos de Coles) (Brocoli, Repollo, Coliflor, Col, Col Rizada, Mostaza, Rabano, Nabos)

Figura 2. Larva de la palomilla dorso de diamante. Crédito: Lyle J. Buss, UF/IFAS

Los vegetales conocidos como crucíferas son un grupo de cultivos amplio y cada vez más importante en Florida. Un número de insectos se alimenta exclusivamente de crucíferas y afecta todos los cultivos enlistados en el título.
This thirty-page fact sheet is the Spanish translation of IG150: Insect Management for Crucifers (Cole Crops). Written by S.E. Webb, A. Nino, y H.A. Smith and published by the Entomology and Nematology Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ig168

Fumigant and Non-Fumigant Nematicides Labeled for Agronomic Crops in Florida

Scanning electron micrograph of a sting nematode male. 2009 Annual Research Report photo by Tyler Jones.

Plant-parasitic nematodes can cause severe yield loss of agronomic crops in Florida. Chemical products for managing plant-parasitic nematodes are called nematicides. This three-page facts heet describes the nematicides registered for use in Florida. Written by Zane Grabau and published by the Department of Entomology and Nematology.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/in1152

Biology and Management of Goosegrass (Eleusine indica (L.) Gaertn.) in Ornamental Plant Production

Figure 4. Seed head Credits: Nathan S. Boyd, UF/IFAS

This six-page fact sheet provides information about the biology and management of goosegrass, including preemergence and postemergence control options. Written by Shawn Steed, Christopher Marble, Nathan S. Boyd, Andrew MacRae, and Kiran Fnu and published by the Environmental Horticulture Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep538

Florida 4-H Tailgate: Smoking and Slow Cooking Meat

Smoked meat at the University of Florida's meat lab.

The Florida 4-H Poultry BBQ program has existed for years, and the program for red meat cookery has been a huge success in Tennessee 4-H. With sponsorship for the winners at the state level, the Florida 4-H Tailgate Contest program will be a success in Florida as well. This program will strive to promote enjoyable outdoor cooking experiences, encourage the incorporation of animal protein in the diet in order to combat childhood obesity, improve youth nutritional knowledge and cooking skills, and impart knowledge about safe handling and proper degree of doneness to produce safe and delicious meat dishes. This 2-page fact sheet is the fourth publication in the Florida 4-H Tailgate series, and it discusses smoking and slow cooking meat. Written by Chad Carr, Brian Estevez, Sonja Crawford, Jason Scheffler, George Baker, Ed Jennings, and Mark Mauldin, and published by the 4-H Youth Development Department, December 2016.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/4h375

Alimentos en Pure: Prueba de Textura con la Prueba de Desplome

Figure 6. A) puréed canned beets with water separation; B) puréed canned beets with the addition of a small amount of puréed kidney beans and showing no water separation (cylinder filled to 2? marking).

This is the Spanish version of FS276 Pureed Foods: Texture Testing with the Slump Test. For individuals with dysphagia, the texture of puréed foods is extremely important. If the puréed foods are either too thick or too thin, it can make it more difficult to swallow. The slump test is a quick, easy, and inexpensive way to assess the texture of foods. This four-page fact sheet describes the slump test, how to perform a slump test, and how the slump test can be used to evaluate the texture of puréed foods. Written by Wendy J. Dahl, and published by the Food Science and Human Nutrition Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fs288

Florida 4-H Tailgate: Fire-Building

A goat sausage link being cooked on a charcoal grill. IFAS Annual Research Report 2008. UF/IFAS Photo: Tyler Jones

The Florida 4-H Poultry BBQ program has existed for years, and the program for red meat cookery has been a huge success in Tennessee 4-H. With sponsorship for the winners at the state level, the Florida 4-H Tailgate Contest program will be a success in Florida as well. This program will strive to promote enjoyable outdoor cooking experiences, encourage the incorporation of animal protein in the diet in order to combat childhood obesity, improve youth nutritional knowledge and cooking skills, and impart knowledge about safe handling and proper degree of doneness to produce safe and delicious meat dishes. This 2-page fact sheet is the third publication in the Florida 4-H Tailgate series, and it discusses fire-building. Written by Chad Carr, Brian Estevez, Sonja Crawford, Jason Scheffler, George Baker, Ed Jennings, and Mark Mauldin, and published by the 4-H Youth Development Department, December 2016.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/4h374

Florida 4-H Tailgate: Meat Selection

Steaks being grilled. Barbecue, grilling, meat, meat science, steak, beef, cooking, food, nutrition. UF/IFAS Photo by Tyler Jones.

The Florida 4-H Poultry BBQ program has existed for years, and the program for red meat cookery has been a huge success in Tennessee 4-H. With sponsorship for the winners at the state level, the Florida 4-H Tailgate Contest program will be a success in Florida as well. This program will strive to promote enjoyable outdoor cooking experiences, encourage the incorporation of animal protein in the diet in order to combat childhood obesity, improve youth nutritional knowledge and cooking skills, and impart knowledge about safe handling and proper degree of doneness to produce safe and delicious meat dishes. This 2-page fact sheet is the fifth publication in the Florida 4-H Tailgate series, and it discusses meat selection. Written by Chad Carr, Brian Estevez, Sonja Crawford, Jason Scheffler, George Baker, Ed Jennings, and Mark Mauldin, and published by the 4-H Youth Development Department, December 2016.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/4h376

Florida 4-H Tailgate: Cooking Safety

Seasoned steaks on a platter, ready for the grill. Barbecue, grilling, meat, meat science, steak, beef, cooking, food, nutrition.

The Florida 4-H Poultry BBQ program has existed for years, and the program for red meat cookery has been a huge success in Tennessee 4-H. With sponsorship for the winners at the state level, the Florida 4-H Tailgate Contest program will be a success in Florida as well. This program will strive to promote enjoyable outdoor cooking experiences, encourage the incorporation of animal protein in the diet in order to combat childhood obesity, improve youth nutritional knowledge and cooking skills, and impart knowledge about safe handling and proper degree of doneness to produce safe and delicious meat dishes. This 3-page fact sheet is the second publication in the Florida 4-H Tailgate series, and it addresses cooking safety. Written by Chad Carr, Brian Estevez, Sonja Crawford, Jason Scheffler, George Baker, Ed Jennings, and Mark Mauldin, and published by the 4-H Youth Development Department, December 2016.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/4h373

Florida 4-H Tailgate: Cooking Equipment

Kabobs being cooked on a grill. Photo taken 09-10-16.

The Florida 4-H Poultry BBQ program has existed for years, and the program for red meat cookery has been a huge success in Tennessee 4-H. With sponsorship for the winners at the state level, the Florida 4-H Tailgate Contest program will be a success in Florida as well. This program will strive to promote enjoyable outdoor cooking experiences, encourage the incorporation of animal protein in the diet in order to combat childhood obesity, improve youth nutritional knowledge and cooking skills, and impart knowledge about safe handling and proper degree of doneness to produce safe and delicious meat dishes. This 2-page fact sheet is the first publication in the Florida 4-H Tailgate series, and it discusses cooking equipment. Written by Chad Carr, Brian Estevez, Sonja Crawford, Jason Scheffler, George Baker, Ed Jennings, and Mark Mauldin, and published by the 4-H Youth Development Department, July 2016.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/4h372

Trueperella (Arcanobacterium pyogenes) in Farmed White-Tailed Deer

A fawn at a private deer farm. Photo by Tyler Jones taken on 10-13-15

Trueperella is a harmless bacterium in intestinal tracts of ruminants like deer, cattle, and pigs, but if it migrates out of the intestine to other areas of an animal’s body and proliferates, it can make the animal sick. Trueperella causes many problems in deer, including lesions, abscesses, and pneumonia, and it is one of the types of bacteria that is known to contribute to the disease lumpy jaw. In young fawns, it is a common cause of death. This 3-page fact sheet written by Kathryn D. Pothier, Katherine A. Sayler, and Samantha M. Wisely and published by the Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation explains how to spot and treat trueperella, or, better yet, prevent it in the first place.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw427

Insect and Mite Integrated Pest Management in Florida Cotton

Cotton farm.

Insect and mite pests of cotton feed on cotton roots, leaves, stems, and fruit and reduce plant health and productivity, and, subsequently, cotton crop yields. These pests hide in different places on or within the plant or field, which makes them difficult to find and identify and costly to manage. The purpose of this 14-page guide written by Joseph Funderburk, Nicole Casuso, Norman Leppla, and Michael Donahoe and published by the Department of Entomology and Nematology is to provide Florida cotton growers a selected set of options for integrated pest management of insects and mites in cotton fields. It serves as a reference for cultural, mechanical, biological, and chemical control of arthropods. The guide includes links to additional UF/IFAS EDIS articles, as well as external sources of information on arthropod management. The guide also contains a searchable table of registered insecticides, herbicides, and fungicides for Florida cotton.
edis.ifas.ufl.edu/in1111


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