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Hurricane Preparedness for Forage Crops in the Southeast United States

Belle Glade, hurricane of 1928. Photos from the Smather's Archives.

This 4-page document provides information on preparing forage crops, conserved forage, and grazing areas for potential hurricane damage and alleviating hurricane damage on forage crops and grazing lands in the Southeast United States, with an emphasis on the Florida peninsula and Gulf Coast. Written by José C. B. Dubeux, Jr. and Edward K. Twidwell, and published by the UF/IFAS Agronomy Department, November 2019.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ag439

Citrus Soil pH Management

Citrus fruit on trees in the campus orange groves. Photo taken 06-22-18.

Management of both soil pH and nutrients is required to maintain soil fertility levels and ensure economic agricultural production. Maintaining soil in the 6.0-6.5 pH range is best for most crops including citrus. This new two-page publication of the UF/IFAS Department of Soil and Water Sciences, written by Kelly Morgan, explains the effects of soil pH on citrus as well as options for management.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ss666

Preflight and Flight Instructions on the Use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) for Agricultural Applications

A drone aircraft in mid-flight. Photo taken 06-14-19.

This 5-page document provides guidance on the appropriate use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) for agricultural applications in Florida. It contains step-by-step instructions for preparing a UAV for flight, creating a mission path (using flight mission planning apps), and collecting UAV-based data. Written by Sri Charan Kakarla, Leon De Morais Nunes, and Yiannis Ampatzidis, and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, November 2019.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ae535

Conducting the Needs Assessment #2: Using Needs Assessments in Extension Programming

Duval County Extension Agent Anita McKinney teaches a "Smart Money" course at the Jacksonville City Rescue Mission in Jacksonville, Florida.

This second publication in the Conducting the Needs Assessment series provides Extension educators and other service providers with a foundational underpinning of how the needs assessment fits within the program planning process. Both formal and nonformal educators seeking to develop and deliver an educational program must first be informed of what their audience lacks in order to develop the right curriculum or training, and therefore conducting a needs assessment is a priority in the program development process. This new publication of the UF/IFAS Department of Agricultural Education and Communication was written by Matthew Benge and Laura Warner.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc347

Attracting Native Bees to Your Florida Landscape

blanketflower and blueberry flowers with native bees

Florida is home to approximately 315 species of native wild bees. These bees rely on flowers for survival; their diets consist exclusively of pollen and nectar harvested from flowers. Recently reported declines in some bee species have heightened awareness of bee conservation across the United States and motivated efforts to increase floral resources for bees. This 7-page fact sheet written by Rachel E. Mallinger, Wayne Hobbs, Anne Yasalonis, and Gary Knox and published by the UF/IFAS Entomology and Nematology Department shows how gardeners and land managers can aid in conservation efforts by planting flowers for bees in home or community gardens.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/IN1255

What Is the Value of an Existing Forest Stand?

pine trees

Traditionally, the land expectation value (LEV) formula, the present value of perpetual cash inflows of timber revenues minus the present value of cash outflows of costs, has been employed as the main indicator of the value of a forest investment. However, when a forest stand is already established, the LEV approach is incomplete because it applies only to bare land. Thus, it is necessary to determine the value of a property with an existing forest stand. This 3-page fact sheet written by Andres Susaeta and Chris Demers and published by the UF/IFAS School of Forest Resources and Conservation provides the formula to determine the value of an already established forest stand at any stage of its development. This approach, known as the forest value formula, includes the value of the timber and the land. It can be used to compare the value of the stand when it is immediately harvested or when it is economically immature.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fr423

The Optimal Forest Management of an Even-Aged Stand: The Biological Rotation versus the Land Expectation Value

Florida forests

This 4-page fact sheet written by Andres Susaeta and Chris Demers and published by the UF/IFAS School of Forest Resources and Conservation provides a guide for forest landowners, managers, and stakeholders in conducting a valuation of timber investments. It reviews and provides examples of two different approaches for determining the optimal rotation age of even-aged forest stands. These methods can help forest landowners and managers in making forestry investment decisions.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fr424

Determining the Net Present Value of Timber Investments and Comparing Investments of Different Rotations

Pine trees, North Florida, Forest. UF/IFAS Photo: Thomas Wright.

Would a forest landowner be economically better off growing a forest for pulpwood production with a short rotation instead of growing the same forest for sawtimber production with a longer rotation? To help answer this and related questions, this 4-page fact sheet written by Andres Susaeta and Chris Demers and published by the UF/IFAS School of Forest Resources and Conservation presents two approaches to determine the profitability of a forest stand. The net present value (NPV) of a single rotation provides the criterion to choose between different forest project investments of equal lives, whereas the equivalent annuity approach (EAA) is employed when forest project investments have different time lengths.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fr421

Bebidas nutricionales suplementarias: Las necesito?

Las bebidas nutricionales suplementarias a menudo se usan en hospitales y hogares de adultos para ayudar a nutrir a quienes pueden comer mal y han perdido peso debido a una enfermedad o falta de apetito. Más recientemente, las bebidas nutricionales están disponibles para la compra de los consumidores. Ejemplos de bebidas o batidos nutricionales suplementarios comunes son Ensure® y Boost®. Esta publicación explora la pregunta que muchos adultos mayores se hacen: “¿Necesito bebidas nutricionales suplementarias?”
This new 3-page publication of the UF/IFAS Food Science and Human Nutrition Department is a Spanish translation of FSHN18-12/FS315, Supplemental Nutrition Drinks: Do I Need Them? Written by Claire Marie Fassett, Nancy J. Gal, and Wendy J. Dahl, and translated by Daniela Rivero Mendoza.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fs321

┐Cuantas comidas debo comer cada dia?

Figure 1. Food preparation area in the home kitchen

Comer de manera saludable no se trata tanto de la cantidad de comidas y meriendas consumidas, sino de los tipos y las cantidades de alimentos totales consumidos en un día. Tratar de cumplir con las porciones recomendadas de los cinco grupos de alimentos, es decir, frutas, verduras, granos, proteínas y productos lácteos ayudará a promover la buena salud y prevenir enfermedades.
This new 2-page publication of the UF/IFAS Food Science and Human Nutrition Department is the Spanish translation of FSHN18-10/FS313, How many meals should I eat each day? Written by Zainab Alyousif and Wendy Dahl, and translated by Daniela Rivero Mendoza.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fs319

Economic Contributions of Agriculture, Natural Resources, and Food Industries in Florida in 2016

bee pollinating citrus flower
Collectively, the agriculture, natural resources, and food industries are significant contributors to the economy of the state of Florida. This 5-page fact sheet written by Christa D. Court, Alan W. Hodges, and Mohammad Rahmani and published by the UF/IFAS Food and Resource Economics Department outlines the economic contributions of these industries in calendar year 2016 to update previous reports from the Economic Impact Analysis Program and to provide current information for the purpose of informed public policy.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe1055

Raising Backyard Chickens for Eggs

Chickens. Chicken, poultry, eggs, small farms livestock. UF/IFAS Photo by Tyler Jones.

Raising backyard chickens is an increasingly popular way to explore self-sufficiency, connect with how our food is produced, and gain experience for future dabbling in food production. This 13-page publication is designed primarily for those considering raising backyard chickens for eggs for personal consumption. Written by Mary E. Henry, Jessica M. Ryals, Alicia Halbritter, and Derek L. Barber, and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Animal Sciences, revised November 2019.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/an239

Sal: ┐Debo recortar su consumo?

fs320

La sal alimentaria está compuesta de sodio y cloruro, dos minerales esenciales necesarios para una buena salud. El sodio es muy importante para nuestro cuerpo para mantener el equilibrio de líquidos, el volumen de sangre y la presión arterial. Sin embargo, muchas personas consumen más sodio en la dieta (de la sal) que lo que se necesita. La disminución de sodio en la dieta ha recibido mucha atención en los últimos años debido a la asociación del alto consumo de sodio en la dieta con hipertensión (presión arterial alta) y enfermedad cardiovascular. Esta publicación explora los efectos en la salud de la ingesta excesiva de sodio y las formas de disminuir la ingesta de este mineral.
This new 3-page publication of the UF/IFAS Food Science and Human Nutrition Department is the Spanish version of FSHN 18-9/FS312: Salt: Should I Cut Back? Written by Asmaa Fatani, Nancy J. Gal, and Wendy J. Dahl, and translated by Daniela Rivero Mendoza.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fs320

Culture de la vanille dans le sud de la Floride

Flowers of V. planifolia (top left), V. pompona (top center), V. phaeantha (top right), V. mexicana (bottom left), V dilloniana (bottom center), and V. barbellata (bottom right) growing in southern Florida.

L’extrait de vanille est populaire dans le monde entier comme ingrédient dans la crème glacée et divers autres desserts. La source botanique de l’extrait de vanille provient principalement des gousses durcies (préparées) de l’espèce Vanilla planifolia. Les États-Unis sont les plus grands importateurs mondiaux de gousses de vanille, mais la production nationale est très faible. Toutefois, le sud de la Floride a un potentiel de production favorable á la culture de la vanille. Ce document contient des informations utiles aux producteurs intéressés par l’établissement d’une vanillerie.
This is the French version of HS1348, Vanilla Cultivation in Southern Florida. This new 9-page publication was written by Alan Chambers, Pamela Moon, Vovener de Verlands Edmond, and Elias Bassil, translated by Francesca Carla Erié, and published by the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1351

Cultivo de vainilla en el sur de Florida

Flowers of V. planifolia (top left), V. pompona (top center), V. phaeantha (top right), V. mexicana (bottom left), V dilloniana (bottom center), and V. barbellata (bottom right) growing in southern Florida.

El extracto de vainilla es popular en el mundo entero como un ingrediente usado en helados y otros postres. La fuente botánica del extracto de vainilla es principalmente los frijoles curados de Vanilla planifolia. El Estados Unidos es el mayor importador mundial de vainilla judías, pero la producción nacional es mínima. El sur de la Florida tiene un clima de crecimiento favorable para el cultivo de vainilla. Este documento incluye información relevante para los productores interesados en establecer un cultivo de vainilla.
This is the Spanish version of HS1348, Vanilla Cultivation in Southern Florida. This new 8-page publication was written by Alan Chambers, Pamela Moon, Vovener de Verlands Edmond, and Elias Bassil, translated by Dayana Valdes, and published by the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1350

Vanilla Cultivation in Southern Florida

Flowers of V. planifolia (top left), V. pompona (top center), V. phaeantha (top right), V. mexicana (bottom left), V dilloniana (bottom center), and V. barbellata (bottom right) growing in southern Florida.

Vanilla extract is popular around the world as an ingredient in ice cream and various other desserts. The botanical source of vanilla extract is primarily the cured beans of Vanilla planifolia. The United States is the world?s largest importer of vanilla beans, but domestic production is minimal. However, southern Florida has a favorable growing environment for vanilla cultivation. This new 7-page publication of the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department includes information relevant to growers interested in establishing a vanillery. Written by Alan H. Chambers, Pamela Moon, Vovener de Verlands Edmond, and Elias Bassil.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1348

Postflight Data Processing Instructions on the Use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) for Agricultural Applications

A drone aircraft in mid-flight. Photo taken 06-14-19.

Remote sensing applications for agriculture often require periodically collected high-resolution data, which are difficult to obtain by manned flights or satellite imagery. This 6-page document provides guidance on the use of post-processing software to visualize data collected by unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) for agricultural applications. It provides step-by-step instructions for using the data collected from a UAV flight to create several types of maps and indices. Written by Sri Charan Kakarla and Yiannis Ampatzidis, and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, October 2019.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ae533

Exemplary Youth Leadership Series: Model the Way

4H congress, 2005. UF/IFAS Photo: Thomas Wright.

This publication series is designed to outline strategies and experiences to expose youth to and engage them with leadership concepts. In this series, activities have been developed to introduce youth to Kouzes and Posner?s five practices of exemplary leaders. This new 2-page article allows students to engage with the first practice: modeling the way. Leaders must identify and exemplify values in order to be effective. The two outlined activities help students illustrate the idea of identifying values and modeling expectations. Written by Megan Stein and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Agricultural Education and Communication.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc346

Overview of Urban Aquaculture

This 6-page fact sheet written by Emily H. Roan, Laura Tiu, Roy P.E. Yanong, Matthew A. DiMaggio, and Joshua T. Patterson and published by the UF/IFAS Program in Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, School of Forest Resources and Conservation provides introductory information for people interested in engaging in commercial or hobby-scale aquaculture in urban or suburban areas. It introduces three common types of urban aquaculture systems, describes the resources and challenges unique to urban aquaculture, and includes a handy “getting started” section.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fa217

Tropical and Subtropical Fruit Propagation

Part of the grafting process

Propagation is an important technique used by tropical and subtropical fruit growers worldwide, allowing plants to be grown cheaply and efficiently. While sexual propagation (by seed) results in plants that are not genetically the same as the mother plant, asexual propagation (cuttings, division, air-layers, and grafting) creates offspring that are clones of the mother plant. Cloning fruit trees is important because it allows different cultivars to be preserved over time. This new 7-page publication of the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department explains both sexual and asexual propagation techniques, why they are used, and what type of propagation is best for which species of tropical fruit. Written by Jeff Wasielewski and Carlos Balerdi.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1349

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