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Management of Plant-Parasitic Nematodes in Florida Field Corn Production

This 8-page fact sheet written by Zane J. Grabau and Christopher Vann and published by the Department of Entomology and Nematology explains how corn producers can spot nematode symptoms, sample for nematodes, and manage nematode problems.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ng014

Xylella fastidiosa and Olive Quick Decline: Symptoms and Identification of an Insect Vectored Pathogen

A healthy Arbequina olive grove in Volusia County, Florida.

A plant disease called Olive Quick Decline is killing olive trees throughout southern Italy. Although the pathogen that causes the disease is not known in Florida, it may spread to the state, which means that olive producers and homeowners with olives must watch for symptoms of the disease as well as for the leafhopper insects that spread it. This 3-page fact sheet written by Whitney Elmore and Jennifer L. Gillett-Kaufman and published by the Department of Entomology and Nematology explains how to monitor for the disease and its insect vectors and offers advice and assistance for commercial and hobby olive growers.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/in1165

Management of Plant-Parasitic Nematodes in Florida Cotton Production

Cotton farm.

This 8-page fact sheet written by Zane J. Grabau and published in January 2017 by the UF Department of Entomology and Nematology explains how to diagnose and manage nematode problems in cotton production.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ng015

Strategies for Communicating Climate Change to Extension Audiences

Rivers and lakes overflowing after a severe storm or hurricane hits. (UF/IFAS photo: Marisol Amador)

Second in a series on climate change communication for Extension professionals, this 5-page fact sheet written by Claire Needham Bode, Martha C. Monroe, and Mark Megalos and published in January 2017 by the UF School of Forest Resources and Conservation provides strategies for overcoming challenges in communicating about climate change.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fr402

Preventing Foodborne Illness: E. coli O157:H7

Credits: Aunt_Spray/iStock.com

This seven-page fact sheet discusses the common foodborne pathogen E. coli O157:H7, especially as it concerns food handlers, processors and retailers. Written by Keith R. Schneider, Renée Goodrich Schneider, Ploy Kurdmongkoltham, and Bruna Bertoldi and published by the Food Science and Human Nutrition Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fs097

Estimating Benefits of Residential Outdoor Water Conservation: A Step-by-Step Guide

This 9-page fact sheet written by Tatiana Borisova, Laura A. Warner, Jennison Searcy, Anil Kumar Chaudhary, and Michael Dukes and published by the UF Department of Food and Resource Economics in February 2017 was developed to help Extension agents, water-conservation managers, and homeowners estimate the economic benefits of residential outdoor water conservation. It provides guidance for reporting benefits, including lowered utility bills for homeowners, reduced water-delivery costs for utilities, and increased water supply. This publication also offers an example of an impact statement.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe1009

Nematode Management for Golf Courses in Florida

UF/IFAS is committed to providing the most current information on the notoriously difficult problem of managing nematodes on golf courses. This publication is updated and revised whenever there is a breaking development, to bring you the new information and management advice. Nine pages, revised in January 2017 by William T. Crow and published by the UF Department of Entomology and Nematology.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/in124

Managing Scale Insects and Mealybugs on Turfgrass

Dimargarodes meridionalis adult female

This 8-page fact sheet written by Adam Dale and published by the UF Department of Entomology and Nematology in February 2017 describes the types of scale insects and mealybugs that can become pests in turf, explains the damage they do, and lists management techniques to control them.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/in1166

Management of Plant-Parasitic Nematodes in Florida Soybean Production

Soybean cyst nematode

This 8-page fact sheet written by Zane J. Grabau and published by the UF Department of Entomology and Nematology in January 2017 explains how to identify and manage a nematode issue in a soybean operation.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ng018

Consultation Forms for Walk-In Clientele and Landscape Site Visits

UF/IFAS Extension sign sitting on peanuts Photo Credits: UF/IFAS Photo by Amy Stuart

This eight-page fact sheet contains forms for horticulture Extension agents and staff to use during walk-in consultations and/or on-site consultations related to plant identification, problem diagnosis, and cultural advice. The forms are available as fillable PDFs. Written by Amanda D. Ali, Laura A. Warner, Sydney Park Brown, Susan Haddock, and Laurie Albrecht and published by the Department of Agricultural Education and Communication.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc277

Rumen Protozoa: The Animals within the Cow

view of cattle crowded in an enclosure, one cow with ear tag facing reader over backs of two other cows Credit: Tyler Jones, UF/IFAS

As a cow ambles around and eats from the feed bunk, legions of other “animals” are feeding within the cow’s rumen. Billions of protozoa swim about in a single, 20-gallon rumen, colliding with one another while engulfing feed particles and bacteria. These microbes contribute vitally to rumen fermentation and have both positive and negative impacts on animal performance. This 4-page fact sheet discusses classification, activities, removal, and impacts of protozoa. Written by Timothy J. Hackmann, and published by the UF Department of Animal Sciences, January 2017.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/an331

Helpful Details for Commercial Propagation of Woody Plant Stem Cuttings

Figure 1. Uppermost recently mature stem cutting is removed by cut just above subtending leaves. The position of the cut results in a cutting that is approximately the desired length. Credits: Tom Yeager, UF/IFAS

This three-page fact sheet provides details that are very important for successful propagation of woody plant stem cuttings, such as sanitation, quality of cuttings, the time of year/day to take cuttings, stem size diameter and length of cutting, location of cuts/terminal bud removal, and environmental conditions. Written by Thomas Yeager and published by the Environmental Horticulture Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep536

Evolution of Citrus Disease Management Programs and Their Economic Implications: The Case of Florida?s Citrus Industry

lemons on the tree at the MFREC

New exotic diseases (citrus canker, HLB, and citrus black spot) have sharply increased the real cost of production of citrus in Florida. Growers have been applying different management strategies, and more effective treatments are being researched. The costs and benefits of these alternatives will need to be quantified to establish their economic feasibility. This 5-page fact sheet written by Ariel Singerman and Marina Burani-Arouca and published by the Food and Resource Economics Department focuses on the costs of managing exotic citrus diseases as they become endemic or established within a citrus industry, with Florida used as an example. The steep increase in the real cost of production of citrus in Florida from 2003/04 to 2014/15 provides evidence that managing endemic exotic diseases is very costly for growers, even without taking into account the effect those diseases have on yields. Therefore, governmental policies focused on preventing the introduction of additional exotic diseases would be highly beneficial for citrus growers and the Florida citrus industry as a whole.
edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe915

Using Dicamba in Dicamba-Tolerant Crops

Chipley, Florida, farm, harvest, October, Washington County, cotton, combine. UF/IFAS Photo: Josh Wickham.

After many years in development, dicamba will likely be fully approved for use in tolerant cotton varieties for the 2017 growing season. There is great concern that dicamba drift can result in significant losses in nearby sensitive crops. This concern is well-founded because many crops (such as soybean, snap bean, and peanut) are highly sensitive to extremely low doses of dicamba. All precautions must be followed if these new dicamba formulations are to be used. This 3-page fact sheet discusses herbicide selection, discontinued use of ammonium sulfate, nozzle selection, boom height, and wind speed. It also addresses a few frequently asked questions. Written by J. Ferrell and R. Leon, and published by the UF Agronomy Department, February 2017.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ag414

Coconut Oil: A Heart Healthy Fat?

Credits: Ekaterina79/iStockphoto

There are many claims about the health benefits of coconut oil. But what is the evidence behind these health claims? Read this five-page fact sheet to learn more about coconut oil and how it might affect heart health. Written by Wendy M. Gans and Gail P.A. Kauwell and published by the Food Science and Human Nutrition department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fs289

Cost of Production for Processed Oranges Grown in Southwest Florida, 2015/16

oranges on the tree with orchard in background

This 4-page fact sheet written by Ariel Singerman and published by the Department of Food and Resource Economics presents the cost of production per acre for processed oranges in southwest Florida during 2015/16. Thirteen growers participated in the survey and provided annual, per-acre costs by program for a “typical” irrigated, mature grove (10+ years old), including resets. The number of acres managed by their combined operations accounts for approximately 41,000 acres, of an estimated 257,298 acres devoted to oranges in the area, so the sample represents 16% of the acreage devoted to oranges in that region. Typical users of the estimates in this publication include growers, consultants, property appraisers, and researchers.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe1007

New Featured Creatures: January and February 2017

Cost of Production for Processed Oranges Grown in Central Florida (Ridge), 2015/16

Orange grove.

This 4-page fact sheet written by Ariel Singerman and published by the Department of Food and Resource Economics presents the cost of production per acre for processed oranges in central Florida during 2015/16. Five growers participated in the survey and provided annual, per-acre costs by program for a “typical” irrigated, mature grove (10+ years old), including resets. The number of acres managed by their combined operations accounts for approximately 29,000 acres, of an estimated 137,154 acres devoted to oranges in the area, so the sample represents 21% of the acreage devoted to oranges in that region. Typical users of the estimates in this publication include growers, consultants, property appraisers, and researchers.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe1006

An Overview of the Grapefruit Market in South Korea

grapefruit, USDA photo

According to the Foreign Agricultural Service of the United States Department of Agriculture, worldwide consumption of fresh grapefruit in 2014/15 increased from 4.2 million to 5.2 million metric tons. China, which is the largest producer of grapefruit, was largely responsible for the increase. In South Korea, however, the state of Florida in the United States has traditionally dominated the grapefruit market. The South Korean grapefruit market has been increasing in recent years and is expected to keep growing. The industry in Florida now faces fierce competition from other suppliers with lower import prices and different harvest seasons. This 5-page fact sheet written by Yan Heng, Hyeyoung Kim, and Lisa House and published by the Food and Resource Economics Department aims to provide an overview of the grapefruit market in South Korea and evaluate the potential of this market for Florida fresh grapefruit producers.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe1003

The Laccate Ganoderma of the Southeastern United States: A Cosmopolitan and Important Genus of Wood Decay Fungi

Figure 3. Range of context tissue characters of the laccate Ganoderma spp. A) Cream-colored context tissue with concentric growth zones typical of G. sessile, illustrating the location of specific basidiocarp tissues; B) Dark brown colored context tissue with concentric growth zones (arrow) of G. tuberculosum; C) All white, homogenous context tissue of G. tsugae; D) Cream-colored context tissue with black, shiny resinous bands (arrow) typical of G. curtisii. Credits: Andrew Loyd, UF/IFAS

Ganoderma Karst. is a large and diverse genus of wood decay fungi that can rot the roots and/or lower trunk of many tree species. There are several laccate (varnished or polished) Ganoderma species that are found in the southeastern United States and this six-page fact sheet provides an overview of the different species. Written by Andrew L. Loyd, Jason A. Smith, Brantlee S. Richter, Robert A. Blanchette, and Matthew E. Smith and published by the Plant Pathology Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pp333


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