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Publication #HS1078

University of Florida Potato Variety Spotlight: Red LaSoda1

Lincoln Zotarelli, Doug Gergela, Chad M. Hutchinson, David Dinkins, and Edsel Redden2

General Comments: Red LaSoda is the red-skinned fresh-market potato standard for Florida. Red LaSoda was observed in 1949 as a deep red mutant of LaSoda in the Louisiana potato breeding program. Originally, LaSoda was a selection from a cross of Triumph and Katahdin. Red LaSoda was released by the USDA and the Louisiana Agricultural Experiment Station in 1953. It has been in trials over many seasons and at many locations in Florida including university and grower sites. Production and quality results provided here are summarized from the red-skinned fresh-market trials conducted by the University of Florida over the past 14 seasons.

General Characteristics: Red LaSoda has white to cream-colored flesh with a round to oblong tuber shape. It has smooth, red to pink-colored skin with deep to intermediate eye depth. The variety has good yield potential and a relatively low specific gravity compared to other red-skinned potato varieties adapted for Florida production (Tables 1 and 2).

Season Length: The time from planting to vine kill is approximately 85–95 days depending on growing conditions during the season. Tuber size should be checked regularly late in the season. Plants should be vine killed when size distribution meets desired goals. The time from vine kill to harvest varies by season. At least two to three weeks should be allowed for tubers to mature and set skin.

Fertilization and Growth: University trials have used approximately 200 lb N/acre. Nitrogen should be managed so that it "runs out" late in the season to improve tuber maturity and skin set. It may require less nitrogen than the UF/IFAS Extension general recommendation of 200 lb N/acre in heavier soils to achieve this goal. P and K should be applied based on soil tests.

Foliage develops rapidly with determinant growth resulting in early to mid-season maturity.

Planting: Tubers should break dormancy before planting. A seed piece of 2½ to 3 oz is desired for planting. Plant spacing should be 5 to 8 inches in-row with 36 to 40 inches between rows. Closer in-row spacing will reduce harvested tuber size. Excessive soil moisture late in the season will degrade lenticel appearance and delay skin set.

Diseases: Red LaSoda has general disease resistance characteristics. The variety is susceptible to scab, early blight, late blight, corky ring spot, and bacterial wilt. A standard extension-recommended disease control program should be followed.

Seed Source: Open variety, available through many seed sources.

Other Information: Hutchinson, C. M., E. H. Simonne, G. J. Hochmuth, D. N. Maynard, W. M. Stall, S. M. Olson, S. E. Webb, T. G. Taylor and S. A. Smith. 2006. “Potato Production in Florida.” In: Vegetable Production Guide for Florida. S. M. Olson and E. H. Simonne, eds. University of Florida.

Potato Association of America variety database: http://potatoassociation.org/Industry%20Outreach/varieties/Red%20Rounds/red_la_soda.html

Figure 1. 

Typical tuber skin and internal flesh color of Red LaSoda.


Credit:

C. Hutchinson


[Click thumbnail to enlarge.]

Tables

Table 1. 

Summary of production statistics and specific gravity of Red LaSoda, a red-skinned fresh-market potato variety grown at the UF/IFAS research and demonstration farm in Hastings, FL

Year

Total Yield

Marketable Yield1

     

Size

     

Size Class

 
     

Distribution by Class %2

Range %

%

 
 

(cwt/A)

(cwt/A)

C

B

A1

A2

A3

A4

A1 to A3

A2 to A4

Culls

Specific Gravity

1998

469

352

--

3

23

35

18

0

76

53

22

1.058

1999

396

329

--

4

64

18

1

0

83

19

13

1.053

2000

326

298

--

4

35

38

18

0

91

46

5

1.072

2001

305

279

--

3

42

42

13

0

97

55

6

1.064

2002

373

341

--

3

43

44

10

0

97

54

6

1.061

2003

495

419

--

3

37

34

20

1

92

55

7

1.059

2004

402

326

7

6

55

26

6

0

88

32

7

1.070

2005

337

299

1

7

55

34

3

0

92

37

3

1.066

2006

431

399

1

4

66

28

0

0

95

28

3

1.063

2007

377

329

1

10

64

20

6 0

0 0

89

26

2

1.060

2008

276

192

3

5

64

5

2

0

71

7

3

1.068

2009

435

338

1

6

50

20

23

0

93

43

16

1.058

2010

375

294

2

12

73

8

5

0

86

10

73

1.076

2011

383

262

3

12

55

23

7

0

84

22

55

1.058

2012

282

138

2

7

47

12

31

0

90

48

47

1.054

Average

377

306

2

6

52

26

11

0

88

36

18

1.063

1Marketable yield: Sum of size classes A1 to A3.

2Size classes: C = ½ to 1½ inches, B = 1½ to 1 7/8 inches, A1 = 1 7/8 to 2½ inches, A2 = 2½ to 3¼ inches, A3 = 3¼ to 4 inches, A4 >4 inches; Size distribution by class: Class (wt)/(Total Yield [wt] – culls [wt])

Table 2. 

Yield, vine maturity, tuber characteristics, and internal tuber defects of Red LaSoda, a red-skinned fresh-market potato variety grown at the UF/IFAS research and demonstration farm in Hastings, FL

 

Vine

   
 

Maturity1

Tuber Characteristics1

Internal Defects2

Year

(vine kill)

IFC

SC

ST

TS

ED

APP

HH

BR

CRS

IHN

1998

-

-

2.0

7.5

2.0

3.0

6.0

-

-

-

-

1999

-

-

2.0

7.0

3.0

3.0

4.0

1

0

0

0

2000

6.3

-

2.0

7.3

2.7

5.3

5.0

1

0

0

1

2001

5.8

1.5

2.7

7.0

2.7

5.3

3.7

0

0

0

0

2002

3.0

1.5

3.0

7.0

3.5

3.5

6.5

1

0

0

0

2003

6.0

1.7

2.7

7.3

2.7

3.7

5.7

1

0

0

4

2004

6.3

1.3

2.3

7.0

2.3

3.7

5.7

1

0

0

0

2005

5.8

1.5

2.5

6.5

3.5

4.5

5.5

0

0

0

0

2006

8.0

1.0

2.5

7.0

2.5

4.0

6.0

0

0

0

0

2007

5.5

1.0

3.0

7.0

3.5

4.5

5.5

1

0

0

0

2008

6.1

2.0

3.0

8.0

2.5

5.0

5.0

0

0

0

0

2009

4.0

1.5

2.0

7.0

3.0

3.0

6.0

0

0

1

0

2010

7.4

1.3

2.0

6.9

3.5

3.0

6.2

6

0

0

0

2011

5.8

1.0

2.8

6.8

3.0

3.0

5.8

2

0

6

0

2012

7.3

1.0

2.5

7.0

3.0

3.0

5.5

0

0

0

0

1See rating system outlined in Florida Rating Code Table (Table 3).

2Percent tuber defects. HH = hollow heart, BR = brown rot, CRS = corky ring spot, IHN = internal heat necrosis.

Table 3. 

Florida rating codes for potato tuber characteristics1

Tuber Characteristics

Rating

Code

Vine

Maturity

Internal

Flesh Color

Skin Color

Skin Texture

Tuber Shape

Eye Depth

Overall Appearance

1

dead

white

purple

partial russet

round

very deep

very poor

2

+-

cream

red

heavy russet

mostly round

--

--

3

yellow and dying

light yellow

pink

moderate russet

round to oblong

deep

poor

4

+-

medium yellow

dark brown

light russet

mostly oblong

--

--

5

moderately senesced

dark yellow

brown

netted

oblong

intermediate

fair

6

+-

pink

tan

slightly netted

oblong to long

--

--

7

starting to senesce

red

buff

moderately smooth

mostly long

shallow

good

8

+-

blue

white

smooth

long

--

--

9

green and vigorous

purple

cream

very smooth

cylindrical

very shallow

excellent

1Based on the standard NE 1031 rating codes for plant and tuber characteristics.

Footnotes

1.

This document is HS1078, one of a series of the Horticultural Sciences Department, UF/IFAS Extension. Original publication date July 2006. Revised August 2013. Visit the EDIS website at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu.

2.

Lincoln Zotarelli, Doug Gergela, and Chad Hutchinson, Horticultural Sciences Department, University of Florida/IFAS; David Dinkins, St. Johns County Cooperative Extension Office; Edsel Redden, Putnam County Cooperative Extension Office, UF/IFAS Extension, Gainesville, 32611.


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. For more information on obtaining other UF/IFAS Extension publications, contact your county's UF/IFAS Extension office.

U.S. Department of Agriculture, UF/IFAS Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A & M University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating. Nick T. Place, dean for UF/IFAS Extension.