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Publication #IPM-204

Common Pepper Cultivars for Florida Production1

G. McAvoy and M. Ozores-Hampton2

This list includes a number of sweet pepper varieties currently popular with Florida growers; it is by no means a comprehensive list of all varieties that may be adapted to the state. At present 4–5 cultivars probably constitute 80–90 percent of commercial production in Florida.

(See Table 1 for Key to Abbreviation)

Figure 1. 

Pepper harvesting from a randomized complete block experimental design bacterial leaf spot resistant pepper variety trial during the 2017 spring season in Jupiter, FL.


Credit:

Monica Ozores-Hampton, UF/IFAS


[Click thumbnail to enlarge.]

Figure 2. 

Aristotle—Dark green anthocyanin-less fruits, heavy set, thick walls, large fruit size. Matures red. R to Xcv 1-3 (X3R®), PVY 0, Tobamo P0 (R). Seminis.


Credit:

Monica Ozores-Hampton, UF/IFAS


[Click thumbnail to enlarge.]

Figure 3. 

Blitz—Extra-large fruit with thick walls and a uniformly blocky shape. Has wide adaptability with good yield. Green to red bell pepper. R to Xcv 1-5 and 7-9, TM. Sakata Seed America, Inc.


Credit:

Monica Ozores-Hampton, UF/IFAS


[Click thumbnail to enlarge.]

Figure 4. 

Crusader—Erect, good cover, extra-large fruit stay firm at mature red stage. R to Xcv 1-3, PVY, S, PepMo, TM. Syngenta.


Credit:

Gene McAvoy, UF/IFAS


[Click thumbnail to enlarge.]

Figure 5. 

Gridiron—Extra-large blocky dark green-to-red bell. Fruit are smooth with thick walls and uniform blocky shape. R to Xcv 1-5 and 7-9, TM. IR to TE. Sakata Seed America, Inc.


Credit:

Monica Ozores-Hampton, UF/IFAS


[Click thumbnail to enlarge.]

Figure 6. 

HM 2641—Tall, erect, vigorous plant with good leaf coverage suited for warm weather production. Glossy, dark green, extra-large, and large sized fruit over an extended production period R to, Xcv 1-4 and TM. Harris Moran Seed Company.


Credit:

Gene McAvoy, UF/IFAS


[Click thumbnail to enlarge.]

Figure 7. 

Hunter—Early maturity. Medium size plant produces smooth, four-lobed, blocky, dark green, glossy fruit. Produces a large percentage of extra large fruit. R to Xcv 1-5, TE, TM. Syngenta.


Credit:

Monica Ozores-Hampton, UF/IFAS


[Click thumbnail to enlarge.]

Figure 8. 

PS 9928302—Large, robust plant with large, uniform anthocyanin-less dark-green fruits that mature to a firm red. Fruits with good size, shape, uniformity, and color. R to Xcv 1-5 (X5R®) and Tobamo P0 (R). Seminis


Credit:

Monica Ozores-Hampton, UF/IFAS


[Click thumbnail to enlarge.]

Figure 9. 

PS 09979325—Large, robust, blocky green-to-red bell pepper. Plant produces large to extra-large firm fruit. R to Xcv 1-10. Seminis.


Credit:

Monica Ozores-Hampton, UF/IFAS


[Click thumbnail to enlarge.]

Figure 10. 

Seedway 48—Medium plant size with large to jumbo, uniform dark green fruit. R to Xcv 1-10.


Credit:

Seedway


[Click thumbnail to enlarge.]

Figure 11. 

Revolution—Cold tolerant, concentrated early set, firm, uniform, extra large green to red fruits. R to Xcv 1,2,3,5 and IR to CM and Pc. Harris Moran Seed Company.


Credit:

Gene McAvoy, UF/IFAS


[Click thumbnail to enlarge.]

Figure 12. 

Tom Cat—Early maturing. Medium plant size and a concentrated set that yields a high percentage of large size fruit. Blocky, dark green color. R to Xcv 1-5, TE, and ToM. Syngenta.


Credit:

Monica Ozores-Hampton, UF/IFAS


[Click thumbnail to enlarge.]

Figure 13. 

Touchdown—Strong plant with continuous setting ability and good cover. Extra-large, blocky with thick walls and uniformly blocky shape. R to Xcv 1-5 and 7-9, TM. Sakata Seed America, Inc.


Credit:

Monica Ozores-Hampton, UF/IFAS


[Click thumbnail to enlarge.]

Figure 14. 

Vanguard—Medium plant with good foliage, dark green, blocky, extra-large fruits, 4-lobed, firm, with thick walls. Early maturity with concentrated harvest. R to PepMo, ToM, and Xcv 1-5. Harris Moran Seed Company.


Credit:

Monica Ozores-Hampton, UF/IFAS


[Click thumbnail to enlarge.]

Mini Sweet Pepper

Figure 15. 

Boris—Smooth and straight fruit with thick flesh. Fruit are held higher in the plant maintaining them clean and straight. R to TSW. Seedway.


Credit:

Seedway


[Click thumbnail to enlarge.]

Figure 16. 

Natasha—Very early maturing plant with long, straight fruit. R to Xcv 1-3. Seedway.


Credit:

Seedway


[Click thumbnail to enlarge.]

Figure 17. 

Orange You Sweet—Early maturing, strong plant vigor. Fruit are flat round in shape and smooth with mid thick walls. Fruit mature to deep orange. No disease resistance. Sakata Seed America, Inc.


Credit:

Sakata Seed America, Inc.


[Click thumbnail to enlarge.]

Figure 18. 

Right on Red—Early maturing plant with continuous high yields. Fruit are flattened and round with flutes around the stem end. No disease resistance. Sakata Seed America, Inc.


Credit:

Sakata Seed America, Inc.


[Click thumbnail to enlarge.]

Figure 19. 

Sopron—Mid-early plant with a straight fruit used for fresh market or processing. R to Xcv 1-3. Seminis.


Credit:

Seminis


[Click thumbnail to enlarge.]

Figure 20. 

Yellow Sparkler—Fruit turn from green to bright, rich yellow. Prolific in number, extra sweet, and elongated with a blunt tip. R to TM. Sakata Seed America, Inc.


Credit:

Sakata Seed America, Inc.


[Click thumbnail to enlarge.]

Figure 21. 

Yes to Yellow—Early maturing, strong plant vigor with fruit that are flat round in shape, smooth, and have thick walls. Fruit mature to deep yellow. No disease resistance. Sakata Seed America, Inc.


Credit:

Sakata Seed America, Inc.


[Click thumbnail to enlarge.]

Figure 22. 

Yummy Orange—Petite apricot-orange with extra-sweet fruit that is tender-crisp and nearly seedless. Resistance not available. Seedway.


Credit:

Seedway


[Click thumbnail to enlarge.]

Figure 23. 

Yummy Red—Plant is best staked and fruit are nearly seedless. Resistance not available. Seedway.


Credit:

Seedway


[Click thumbnail to enlarge.]

Yummy Yellow—Image not available. Medium large plant with good cover. Fruit are similar in size to Yummy Orange. Resistance not available. Seedway.

Cubanelle

Figure 24. 

Aruba—Cubanelle type, early-maturing, erect plant, 3 – 4 lobed, elongated fruit, matures from a pale lime green to a bright red. Syngenta.


Credit:

Siegers Seed Co.


[Click thumbnail to enlarge.]

Note—while this list includes a number of varieties currently popular with Florida growers, it is by no means a comprehensive list of all varieties that may be adapted to the state.

Tables

Table 1. 

Key to Abbreviation.

CMV

Cucumber mosaic virus

PepMo

Pepper mottle virus

PVY

Potato virus Y

Pc

Phytophthora root rot—Phytophthora capsici

ToM

Tomato mosaic virus

TM

Tobacco mosaic virus

TE

Tobacco etch virus

TSW

Tomato spotted wilt virus

Tobamo P0 (R)

Tobamo virus—Tobamo virus Po

S

Stip—Physiological disorder

Xcv 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

Bacterial spot—Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria

R

Resistant

IR

Intermediate Resistance

Footnotes

1.

This document is IPM-204, one of a series of the Department of Entomology and Nematology, UF/IFAS Extension. Original publication date November 2007. Revised November 2014 and December 2017. Visit the EDIS website at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu.

2.

G. McAvoy, county Extension director and regional vegetable Extension agent; and M. Ozores-Hampton, associate professor; UF/IFAS Southwest Florida Research and Education Center, Immokalee, FL 34142.


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. For more information on obtaining other UF/IFAS Extension publications, contact your county's UF/IFAS Extension office.

U.S. Department of Agriculture, UF/IFAS Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A & M University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating. Nick T. Place, dean for UF/IFAS Extension.