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Publication #SS-AGR-410

Sugarcane Cultivars Descriptive Fact Sheet: CP 96-1252, CP 01-1372, and CP 00-11011

Hardev Sandhu and Wayne Davidson2

Sugarcane cultivars CP 96-1252, CP 01-1372, and CP 00-1101 are the top three commercial sugarcane cultivars in Florida, occupying more than 43% of total sugarcane area (400,551 acres) (VanWeelden et al. 2016). These cultivars are developed through the cooperative agreement among the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Canal Point, the UF/IFAS Everglades Research and Education Center in Belle Glade, and the Florida Sugar Cane League. This fact sheet provides information on the cultivars’ parentage, flowering, cold tolerance, yields, disease response, and major growth or yield issues. Table 1 includes information on release dates, targeted soil types, parents, flowering, cold tolerance, best features, and limiting features. Table 2 provides yield and disease information.

CP 96-1252: CP 96-1252 is the top commercial sugarcane cultivar in Florida, occupying 22.5% of total sugarcane area in the state. CP 96-1252 is cultivated on both muck and sand soils. Resistance to orange rust, an important sugarcane disease in Florida caused by Puccinia kuehnii, is an excellent characteristic of this cultivar. Orange rust can cause major yield losses (exceeding 50% in susceptible cultivars). The extended duration of the disease makes chemical control expensive. CP 96-1252 is susceptible to brown rust caused by Puccinia melanocephala, but chemical control is efficient and less expensive due to the limited duration of this disease.

Figure 1. 

CP 96-1252 at early growth stage in muck soil.


Credit:

Wayne Davidson, Florida Sugar Cane League


[Click thumbnail to enlarge.]

Figure 2. 

CP 96-1252 at early growth stage in sand soil.


Credit:

Wayne Davidson, Florida Sugar Cane League


[Click thumbnail to enlarge.]

Figure 3. 

CP 96-1252 at late growth stage in muck soil.


Credit:

Wayne Davidson, Florida Sugar Cane League


[Click thumbnail to enlarge.]

CP 01-1372: CP 01-1372 is the second most widely grown sugarcane cultivar in Florida, occupying 11.8% of the total acreage. CP 01-1372 is primarily cultivated on muck soil and occupies only 2% of total sand acreage. High tonnage and late sucrose are the major positives of this cultivar. Susceptibility to orange rust and smut are major concerns. Also, lodging at harvest and brittle stalks negatively affect the seed quality of this cultivar.

Figure 4. 

CP 01-1372 at early growth stage in muck soil.


Credit:

Wayne Davidson, Florida Sugar Cane League


[Click thumbnail to enlarge.]

Figure 5. 

CP 01-1372 at late growth stage in muck soil.


Credit:

Wayne Davidson, Florida Sugar Cane League


[Click thumbnail to enlarge.]

Figure 6. 

CP 01-1372 stalks with exposed internodes.


Credit:

Wayne Davidson, Florida Sugar Cane League


[Click thumbnail to enlarge.]

Figure 7. 

CP 01-1372 bud.


Credit:

Wayne Davidson, Florida Sugar Cane League


[Click thumbnail to enlarge.]

CP 00-1101: CP 00-1101 ranks third in Florida, occupying 10% of total sugarcane acreage. Almost 100% of its cultivation is on muck soil. High sucrose content is the main positive attribute of this cultivar. CP 00-1101 has an erect canopy, which is good for harvesting and planting. Susceptibility to orange rust and sugarcane rust mite (Abacarus sacchari) are primary factors behind the recent decline in its acreage.

Figure 8. 

CP 00-1101 at early growth stage in muck soil.


Credit:

Wayne Davidson, Florida Sugar Cane League


[Click thumbnail to enlarge.]

Figure 9. 

CP 00-1101 at late growth stage in muck soil.


Credit:

Wayne Davidson, Florida Sugar Cane League


[Click thumbnail to enlarge.]

Figure 10. 

CP 00-1101 internodes and buds.


Credit:

Wayne Davidson, Florida Sugar Cane League


[Click thumbnail to enlarge.]

Figure 11. 

CP 00-1101 auricle.


Credit:

Wayne Davidson, Florida Sugar Cane League


[Click thumbnail to enlarge.]

Reference

VanWeelden, M. T., R. W. Rice, W. Davidson, and S. Swanson. 2016. “Sugarcane variety census: Florida 2015.” Sugar Journal 79(2): 12–23.

Tables

Table 1. 

Basic information on CP 96-1252, CP 01-1372, and CP 00-1101.

Trait

CP 96-1252

CP 01-1372

CP 00-1101

Release Date

2003

2008

2007

Soil Type

Muck and sand

Muck and sand

Muck

Parents

CP 90-1533 X CP 84-1198

CP 94-1200 X CP 89-2143

CP 89-2143 X CP 89-2143

Freeze Tolerance

Not tested

Good

Good

Flowering

Early and heavy

None to very light

None to very light

Best Features

High cane yield in both muck and sand, resistance to orange rust

Resistance to brown rust, good ratoon production with high stalk population

High sucrose level, very erect stalks

Limiting Features

Susceptible to brown rust

Very recumbent and brittle for machine-cut seed, susceptible to orange rust and smut

Susceptible to orange rust and rust mite, with lower tonnage in stubble

Table 2. 

Yield parameters and disease reactions of CP 96-1252, CP 01-1372, and CP 00-1101.

Trait

CP 96-1252 (yields are compared to CP 70-1133)

CP 01-1372 (yields are compared to CP 89-2143)

CP 00-1101 (yields are compared to CP 89-2143)

Tons of Cane per Acre (TCA)

+8.5% (muck), +26.5%(sand)

+35% (muck), +23% (sand)

+7% (muck), +8% (sand)

Commercially Recoverable Sucrose (CRS)

+4.5% (muck), +2.7% (sand)

+1% (muck), +3% (sand)

+2% (muck), +1% (sand)

Tons of Sugar per Acre (TSA)

+13.5% (muck), +30.2% (sand)

+35% (muck), +26% (sand)

+8% (muck), +10% (sand)

Economic Index1

+17.4% (muck), +38.1% (sand)

+42% (muck), +33% (sand)

+10% (muck), +14% (sand)

Fiber

9.4%

9.5%

10.2%

Brown Rust

S

R

R

Bru12

-

+

+

Orange Rust

R

S

S

Leaf Scald

R

MR

R

Smut

R

S

R

SCMV3

R

R

R

1 Economic index is the dollar value of crop on per acre basis. It is calculated based on sugar yield, price of raw sugar, and harvesting and milling costs.

2Bru1 is the name of the gene that provides resistance against brown rust disease.

3SCMV stands for Sugarcane Mosaic Virus, which causes sugarcane mosaic disease.

Footnotes

1.

This document is SS-AGR-410, one of a series of the Agronomy Department, UF/IFAS Extension. Original publication date December 2016. Visit the EDIS website at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu.

2.

Hardev Sandhu, assistant professor, Agronomy Department, UF/IFAS Everglades Research and Education Center, Belle Glade, FL 33430; and Wayne Davidson, agronomist, Florida Sugar Cane League, Clewiston, FL 33440; UF/IFAS Extension, Gainesville, FL 32611.


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. For more information on obtaining other UF/IFAS Extension publications, contact your county's UF/IFAS Extension office.

U.S. Department of Agriculture, UF/IFAS Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A & M University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating. Nick T. Place, dean for UF/IFAS Extension.