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Bismarckia nobilis: Bismarck Palm

Figure 1. Bismarckia nobilis.The Bismarck palm is a native of Madagascar that grows to a height of 30 to 60 feet with a spread of 12 to 16 feet. The massive 4-foot-wide costapalmate leaves are typically silver-green in color, but a light olive-green-leaved variety also exists. The persistent leaf bases are split, creating an attractive pattern on the 15?18-inch-diameter trunks. The dark brown male and female inflorescences are produced on separate trees, with females developing olive-brown fruit about 1.5 inches in diameter. The bold texture and color and eventual great height of this species make a strong statement in any setting, but can be overpowering in small residential landscapes. This 3-page fact sheet was written by Timothy Broschat, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, February 2015. (Photo credit: T. K. Broschat)
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/st101

Impacto de las variedades de tomate y su estado de madurez en la susceptibilidad a Salmonella

Figure 1. Tomatoes of different varieties at different maturity stages are cued for testing for their resistance to SalmonellaDe 1998 a 2007 la fruta fresca, verdura, especias y nueces fueron comúnmente asociados con brotes de gastroenteritis (Batz, Hoffman, y Morris 2011). Salmonella se ha convertido en uno de los patógenos humanos más problemáticos asociado a productos frescos, nueces y a los alimentos que contienen esos ingredientes (Batz, Hoffman, y Morris 2011; deWaal, Tian, y Plunkett 2009). Esta hoja informativa fue producida para proveer información actualizada sobre las prácticas de producción de tomate y sus asociaciones con Salmonella. Esta información es útil para los Agentes de Extensión Agraria en sus programas de educación sobre cultivos hortícolas. This 3-page fact sheet is the Spanish language version of Impact of Tomato Varieties and Maturity State on Susceptibility of Tomatoes to Salmonella (SS627). It was written by Massimiliano Marvasi, Max Teplitski, and George Hochmuth, and published by the UF Department of Soil and Water Science, February 2015. (Photo: Max Teplitski)
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ss629

Contribucion de las practicas de produccion de cultivos y las condiciones climaticas a la seguridad microbiologica de los tomates y pimientos

Figure 1. Tomato plants in the field at the UF/IFAS Research and Education Center in Citra, Florida, are subjected to different irrigation and fertilization regimens.Durante la última década, las frutas, verduras y frutos secos se encuentran entre los alimentos relacionados con brotes de gastroenteritis causadas por cepas enterovirulentas de E. coli y Salmonella no tifoidea que resultan en miles de hospitalizaciones y pérdidas de varios millones de dólares en la industria de alimentos (Mandrell 2009; Batz, Hoffman, y Morris 2011). Desde 2006, dieciséis brotes de salmonelosis se han relacionado con el consumo de frutas y verduras, incluyendo tomates, melones, coles, pepinos, mangos, piñones, pistachos, mantequilla de maní, papayas, pimientos y además alimentos congelados y procesados que contienen productos vegetales. Esta hoja informativa fue producida para proveer información actualizada sobre las prácticas de producción de tomate y sus asociaciones con Salmonella. Esta información es útil para Agentes de Extensión Agraria en sus programas de educación sobre cultivos hortícolas. This 4-page fact sheet is the Spanish language version of The Role of Crop Production Practices and Weather Conditions in Microbiological Safety of Tomatoes and Peppers (SS628). It was written by Massimiliano Marvasi, Max Teplitski, and George Hochmuth, and published by the UF Department of Soil and Water Science, February 2015.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ss630

Robbing Behavior in Honey Bees

Figure 1. The colonies in this apiary are being equalized (i.e. populations are being made uniform). Having many colonies open at the same time caused the bees from the colonies to initiate a robbing frenzy.Western honey bee workers can invade and steal honey/nectar from other colonies or sugar/corn syrup from feeders used to deliver syrup to other colonies. This is called ?robbing? behavior. Robbing behavior typically involves the collection of nectar and honey, but not pollen or brood. Some beekeepers report that robbing bees may steal wax or propolis from other hives, but there is not much data available on this occurrence. Robbing behavior can escalate quickly from just a few bees robbing other colonies to a massive frenzy of bees robbing many colonies in an apiary. This 3-page fact sheet was written by Ryan Willingham, Jeanette Klopchin, and James Ellis, and published by the UF Department of Entomology and Nematology, February 2015. (Photo Credit: UF/HBREL)
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/in1064

Datos sobre el potasio

Figure 1. Legumes are excellent sources of potassium. Whether you start with the dried form or use convenient canned beans (low sodium is best), you will get a rich source of potassium.El potasio es un mineral que se encuentra dentro de las células del cuerpo. Es uno de algunos minerales conocidos como electrolitos. Estos minerales (potasio, sodio y cloro) se encuentran en los fluidos dentro y fuera de las células del cuerpo. This 2-page fact sheet is the Spanish language version of Facts about Potassium written by R. Elaine Turner and Linda B. Bobroff, and published by the UF Department of Family Youth and Community Sciences, February 2015.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy1214

Economic Impacts of Highway Beautification in Florida

Figure 2. Industry output and value-added impacts of highway beautification expenditures by FDOT districts, FY 2008?2013The Florida Department of Transportation is allocated money every year for highway landscaping projects. They make driving more pleasant and are better for the environment, but do they attract private investment and contribute to the economy? This study, commissioned by the FDOT, finds that the average annual economic impacts of highway beautification expenditures in Florida during 2008?2013 amounted to $46 million in output impacts and $28 million in value-added impacts. This 7-page fact sheet was written by Hayk Khachatryan, Alan W. Hodges, Mohammad Rahmani, and Thomas J. Stevens, and published by the UF Department of Food and Resource Economics, December 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe963

De compras para la salud: Las hierbas y las especias

set of wooden bowls with different spicesLas hierbas y las especias han sido usadas durante cientos de años en la cocina y en la medicina. Estas añaden una amplia gama de sabores a los alimentos y también pueden proporcionar beneficios para salud. Para algunas personas, el uso de hierbas y de especias en la cocina puede ser un reto—¡pero no tiene qué ser así! La siguiente información le permitirá estar en un buen camino para disfrutar de una sazón sabrosa y saludable.This 4-page fact sheet is the Spanish language version of Shopping for Health: Herbs and Spices, written by Jenna A. Norris and Wendy J. Dahl, and published by the UF Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, January 2015.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fs264

De compras para la salud: Las frutas

grocery bag with fruitLas frutas tienen un buen sabor y son buenas para usted. Algunas frutas son muy ricas en nutrientes. Es decir, contienen muchas vitaminas, minerales, antioxidantes y fibra que su cuerpo necesita para estar saludable. Ya sea que le gusten las frutas frescas o los jugos de fruta, las frutas congeladas o enlatadas, es importante escoger una variedad diferente cada día. Algunos consejos para ayudarle antes durante y después de ir a comprar frutas.This 4-page fact sheet is the Spanish language version of Shopping for Health: Fruit, written by Ashley R. Kendall y Wendy J. Dahl, and published by the UF Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, January 2015.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fs263

Smutgrass Control in Perennial Grass Pastures

Figure 1. Smutgrass infestations are common in bahiagrass pastures throughout Florida. Smutgrass is a serious weed of improved perennial grass pastures, roadsides, natural areas, and waste areas in Florida. A 2003 survey found that smutgrass was second only to tropical soda apple as the most problematic weed species in Florida pastures, but now that practices to control tropical soda apple have been widely adopted in Florida, smutgrass is likely the most problematic weed species in Florida pastures today. This 4-page fact sheet was written by Brent Sellers, J. A. Ferrell, and N. Rana, and published by the UF Department of Agronomy, January 2015. (Photo Credit: B. Sellers, UF/IFAS)
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/aa261

Healthy Living: Checking Blood Glucose

Figure 1.  A blood glucose meter (or glucometer) uses a tiny drop of blood to test your blood glucose level.Checking your blood glucose levels is an important part of managing diabetes. Your blood glucose values let you know how well your care plan is working and if you need to make any changes. This 3-page fact sheet was written by Jennifer Hillan and Linda B. Bobroff, and published by the UF Department of Family Youth and Community Sciences, February 2015.(Photo iStock/Thinkstock.com)
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy868

Conservation Subdivision: Post-construction Phase: Policy Directions and the Importance of Assessing Stakeholder Opinions

Figure 1. A dragonfly using an urban habitat patch in Gainesville, FL.Simply designating open space in a development is not enough to provide long-term protection for a variety of wildlife. New policies need to be developed that encourage developers of conservation developments to adopt long-term management practices that support biodiversity conservation. This 5-page fact sheet discusses policy options that could be used to support conservation management practices and reports on a survey of Colorado landowners who have created conservation developments and their opinions about a policy option to support the implementation of management practices. Written by Daniel Feinberg and Mark Hostetler, and published by the UF Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, December 2014. (Photo credit: Daniel Feinberg)
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw401

Howea forsteriana: Kentia Palm

Figure 1. Mature kentia palm in the landscape.The kentia palm is considered one of the best interior palms for its durability and elegant appearance. The dark green graceful crown of up to three dozen leaves gives it a tropical appearance. Containerized palms can be used on a deck or patio in a shady location or the palm can be planted into the landscape.This 3-page fact sheet was written by Samar Shawaqfeh and Timothy Broschat, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, January 2015. (Photo credit: T. K. Broschat)
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/st297

Urban Pests and Pest Management

Figure 1. This fact sheet is excerpted from SP486: Pests in and around the Southern Home, which is available from the UF/IFAS Extension Bookstore. http://ifasbooks.ifas.ufl.edu/p-1222-pests-in-and-around-the-southern-home.aspxThe warm southern states provide an ideal environment for a wide variety of pests — and because almost everyone has problems with pests, most urban areas are sprayed with pesticides. 30 to 40 percent of pesticide use is in urban areas, but most pesticide applications are unnecessary and can result in environmental contamination and human exposure to pesticides. This 5-page fact sheet from Pests in and around the Southern Home introduces integrated pest management practices that can help reduce pesticide use in the home. Written by P.G. Koehler, and published by the UF Department of Entomology and Nematology, October 2013.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/in1073

Ten Strategies for Working With Your Home Owner Association to Convert to a Florida-Friendly Yard

Figure 13. Example of an image that clearly shows plant material.Many homeowners are beginning to rethink their landscapes for several reasons, including mandated water and fertilizer restrictions, increasing maintenance costs, and concern for the environment. But over sixty million people now live in neighborhoods governed by Homeowner Associations, whose regulations can make it difficult to implement some changes by mandating types of plants, percentages of turf and plant material, location of plant materials, and restricting specialty gardens to back yards. More environmentally sound landscapes are possible with careful planning and design and by using an educated and knowledgeable approach to working with the HOA board to gain approval for a new landscape. This 9-page fact sheet offers several strategies for working within HOA regulations to gain approval for a Florida-Friendly landscape. Written by Gail Hansen and Claire Lewis, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, February 2015. (Photo credit: Florida-Friendly Landscaping™ Program)
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep513

Plant Connections Member?s Manual

Figure 1. Plants are a very important part of our ecosystemThe Kids Growing with Plant Connections Youth Workbook (4H194/4H PSM 11) is aimed at educating youth about the basics of horticulture. Youth will be exposed to information on plants and the plant kingdom. Lessons include: What Is a Plant?–Why Are Plants Important?–What Makes Plants Grow?–How to Grow Plants–How to Select and Handle Plants. The Plant Connections Leader’s Guide (4H192/4H PSL 21) is used in conjunction with this youth workbook. This 25-page workbook was written by Janice Easton and Deborah J. Glauer, and published by the UF Department of 4-H Youth Development, January 2015.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/4h194

Kids Growing with Plant Connections Leader?s Guide (4H PSL 21)

youth in his garden with leaderThis 195-page curriculum guide is aimed at educating youth about the basics of horticulture. Youth will be exposed to information on plants and the plant kingdom. Written by Janice Easton and Deborah J. Glauer, and published by the UF Department of 4-H Youth Development, January 2015.

Single PDF:http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/4h192
Individual Chapters:

Biology and Management of Eclipta (Eclipta prostrata) in Ornamental Crop Production

Figure 2. Eclipta growth in a mulched landscape bed. Note the purplish stems, lanceolate leaves, and prostrate growth habit.Eclipta grows aggressively in containers and can outcompete nursery crops for water, nutrients, and light. Plants flower in as little as five weeks after germination and produce thousands of seeds over the course of a growing season, and stem fragments left on the soil or media surface following hand-weeding or cultivation can root and reproduce vegetatively. This 4-page fact sheet describes the plant, its biology, and recommendations for physical, cultural, and chemical control. Written by Chris Marble, Shawn Steed, and Nathan S. Boyd, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, January 2015. (Photo: Annette Chandler, UF/IFAS)
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep512

Shopping for Health: Snack Foods

Home made crispy kale chipsAt first glance, you might think that snacking should be avoided because of the extra calories they can add to your diet. However, studies have shown there may be benefits when healthy snack choices are made. Read this 4-page fact sheet to learn about the benefits of healthy snacks and to learn healthy snack shopping tips. Includes recipes for homemade crispy kale chips and peanut butter and jelly yogurt. Written by Carley Rusch and Wendy J. Dahl, and published by the UF Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, January 2015. (Photo: iStock/Thinkstock.com)
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fs262

Ecosystem Services Valuation for Estuarine and Coastal Restoration in Florida

A canal close to the beach in Naples, Florida.Throughout Florida’s history, humans have altered the coastlines, leading to large-scale degradation of coastal ecosystems. This has led to the loss of associated ecosystem services, including products such as food and timber and processes like coastal protection and disease control. Unfortunately, ecosystem restoration efforts have not always been a priority for coastal management. This 10-page literature review surveys the available ecosystem-service valuation literature for five of Florida’s coastal natural communities–oyster reefs, beach dunes, mangrove forests, seagrass beds, and salt marshes–to facilitate the quantification of ecosystem services to provide a better measure of the full impact of restoration efforts. Written by Susanna Blair, Carrie Adams, Tom Ankersen, Maia McGuire, and David Kaplan, and published by the UF Department of Sea Grant, November 2014. (UF/IFAS photo by Tyler Jones)
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/sg134

Biology and Management of Hairy Bittercress (Cardamine hirsute) in Ornamental Crop Production

Figure 1. Bittercress with clumping growth habit in loropetalum cuttings. Credit: Chris Marble Bittercress commonly grows in the potting media of container-grown ornamentals and often through drainage holes in nursery containers. It also can be a problem in propagation houses, greenhouses, and in the field. This 6-page fact sheet provides species description, plant biology, and management recommendations. Written by Chris Marble, Shawn Steed, and Nathan S. Boyd, and published by the UF Department of Environmental Horticulture, December 2014.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep511


2014 ROA information

Annual Statistics for 2014 reports will be available November 17th. More...

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EDIS is the Electronic Data Information Source of UF/IFAS Extension, a collection of information on topics relevant to you. More...

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