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Integrating Critical Thinking into Extension Programming #5: Using Critical Thinking Styles to Enhance Team Work

colorful people around a table
The final part of the Integrating Critical Thinking in Extension Programming series, this article continues the discussion of how to take into account critical thinking methods and styles when developing Extension programs. Well-formed working groups allow members to work successfully solve problems as a group. This three-page fact sheet explains the importance of critical thinking styles when it comes to team work. Written by Alexa J. Lamm and published by the Department of Agricultural Education and Communication.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc210

Integrating Critical Thinking into Extension Programming #4: Measuring Critical Thinking Styles Using the UFCTI

Some home occupants are more bothered by their utility bill than others.
The fourth installment in the Integrating Critical Thinking into Extension Programming series, this article explains the University of Florida Critical Thinking Inventory (UFCTI), a method of determining a person’s critical thinking style. This three-page fact sheet describes the history and development of the UFCTI, how to interpret the results, and how to use the test to enhance Extension programs. Written by Alexa J. Lamm and published by the Department of Agricultural Education and Communication.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc209

Hydrilla: Florida's Worst Submersed Weed

Hydrilla in a lake
Hydrilla, which was originally introduced to the state as an aquarium plant, was intentionally planted in canals by aquarium plant dealers in the 1950s and quickly escaped cultivation. In addition to being one of the world’s worst aquatic weeds, the species is Florida’s most intensively managed submersed plant. Hydrilla is a federally listed noxious weed and a prohibited aquatic plant in Florida, making cultivation, sale, and possession of the species illegal. This 7-page fact sheet discusses the classification, characteristics, habitat, and management of hydrilla. Written by Lyn A. Gettys and Stephen F. Enloe, and published by the UF Agronomy Department, February 2016.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ag404

Cost of Production for Processed Oranges in Central Florida (Ridge), 2014/15

oranges on the tree with orchard in background
UF/IFAS researchers collected data from five growers to estimate the cost of production per acre for processed oranges in central Florida during 2014/15. The cost estimates in this 4-page fact sheet written by Ariel Singerman and published by the Food and Resource Economics Department do not represent any individual operation. Instead, their purpose is to serve as a benchmark for the Florida citrus industry. Typical users of these estimates include growers, consultants, property appraisers, and researchers.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe985

Cost of Production for Fresh Grapefruit in East Florida (Indian River), 2014/15

Orange grove.
This 4-page article written by Ariel Singerman and published by the Food and Resource Economics Department presents the cost of production per acre for growing fresh grapefruit in the Indian River region during 2014/15, based on a survey of growers conducted at the Indian River Citrus League production committee meeting in March 2015. The cost estimates do not represent any individual operation; rather, their purpose is to serve as a benchmark for the industry. Typical users of these estimates include growers, consultants, property appraisers, and researchers.
edis.ifas.ufl.edu/FE984

Choosing a Licensed Wood-Destroying Organism (WDO) Inspector

Eastern subterranean termite
A wood-destroying organism inspection is a visual inspection performed by a licensed pest control inspector trained to identify evidence of termites, powderpost beetles, and other organisms that chew on wood and cause damage to property. Home buyers and sellers, real estate professionals, and lending institutions order these inspections before real estate transactions. This 4-page fact sheet written by Faith M. Oi, Paul Mitola, Kathleen Ruppert, Michael Page, and Mark Ruff and published by the Entomology and Nematology Department explains how to select an inspector who is licensed and certified so that you can be confident in the inspection.
edis.ifas.ufl.edu/IN629

University of Florida Potato Variety Spotlight: ?Marcy?

Figure 1. Typical tuber and internal flesh color of Marcy potato variety. Credits: Lincoln Zotarelli
This article introduces the potato variety, ‘Marcy’, which was developed at the University of Florida. ‘Marcy’ is a white-flesh and white-skinned fresh-market potato variety that has demonstrated high yield and good tuber characteristics. This three-page fact sheet provides the general characteristics, season length and growth information, fertilization and planting instructions, as well as disease information for the potato variety, ‘Marcy’.
Written by Rodrick Z. Mwatuwa, Christian T. Christensen, and Lincoln Zotarelli, and published by the Horticultural Sciences Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1277

Encouraging Landscape Water-Conservation Behaviors #5: Segmenting the Audience Based on HOA Status

John Cisar, a professor of Environmental Horticulture at the University of Florida's Fort Lauderdale Research and Education Center, is studying how turfgrass and other landscape plants can help prevent nitrogen from leaching through the soil into groundwater, Wednesday - Aug. 13, 2003. He said three years of research have shown that turfgrass is most effective in reducing nitrogen leaching and should be used in Florida landscapes. Other plants require more time to become established and slow nitrogen leaching through the soil.
The newest article in the Encouraging Landscape Water-Conservation Behavior series, this six-page fact sheet provides Extension professionals with information on segmenting audiences based on their home owner association status. It provides data that shows how HOA membership potentially affects the barriers that households face when adopting conservation measures and explains how Extension professionals should use this information to enhance programming by strategically planning programs based on the similarities between clients.Written by Laura A. Warner, Alexa J. Lamm, Emmett Martin, Joy N. Rumble, and Esen Momol, and published by the Department of Agricultural Education and Communication.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc246

Molluscan Shellfish Aquaculture and Production

Bags of clams packaged for sale. Ocean, seafood, fishing.   UF/IFAS Photo by Tyler Jones.
Molluscan shellfish aquaculture provides high quality and high value seafood for human consumption, and shellfish provide environmentally beneficial ecosystem services, such as nutrient extraction and water filtration, to the environment in which they are grown. In the past five decades, global fisheries and aquaculture have grown steadily, and seafood consumption per capita has increased. Molluscan shellfish has traditionally been a major component of world aquaculture. Today, molluscs are cultured in 76 countries. This 8-page fact sheet written by Huiping Yang, Leslie N. Sturmer, and Shirley Baker describes molluscan shellfish aquaculture in the United States and worldwide and outlines molluscan shellfish aquaculture stages and methodologies.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fa191

New and Revised Featured Creatures, April 2016

Healthy Eating: Improving Your Convenience Foods

A depiction of the different packaging and processing of fresh fruit now available in US grocery stores. UF/IFAS photo: Thomas WrightConvenience foods are foods that require little preparation. Some convenience foods only require heating and are ready to eat in less than five minutes! The majority of convenience foods are processed foods. However, precut, prewashed, frozen, and canned fruits and vegetables also can be classified as convenience foods. They are healthy foods but are usually more expensive than less prepared fresh fruits and vegetables. This 2-page fact sheet is a major revision that discusses pros and cons of convenience foods, improvement of nutritional quality, common convenience foods and easy additions, and additional tips. Written by Emily Minton and Linda B. Bobroff, and published by the UF Department of Family, Youth and Community Sciences, revised March 2016.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy1312

School Gardens: A Growing Part of Schools

Students at the Loxahatchee Groves Elementary School in Palm Beach County are learning how to grow their own vegetables in the new SOAR (Sharing Our Agricultural Roots) project started by the University of Florida's Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences in cooperation with public schools and volunteers from the county farm community. UF plant pathologist Richard Raid, working with the young gardeners on Monday, June 2, said the SOAR project teaches children about composting, recycling and other ways to protect the environment.
School gardens have been popping up like little pea plants in schools all over Florida. Not only are they an excellent way to get fresh produce into classrooms and cafeterias, but they also provide students with a living classroom where concepts related to science, math, agriculture, and nutrition can be learned and applied. This 4-page fact sheet discusses the benefits of school gardens to children and teachers, different types of school gardens, and points to consider while planning. Written by Kohrine Counts and Karla P. Shelnutt, and published by the UF Department of Family, Youth and Community Sciences, February 2016.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy1463

Tong Hao: an Asian Vegetable Emerging in Florida

Figure 5. Tong Hao leaves in stir-frying.
Tong Hao (Glebionis coronaria) is a member of the daisy family and therefore a relative of lettuce. It is an important vegetable in Asian communities. Grown in China for more than 900 years, Tong Hao is a branched annual leafy herb that can be cooked and eaten. This four-page fact sheet provides background information about Tong Hao, including information on growing, harvesting, and cooking it. Written by Guodong Liu, Qingren Wang, Bonnie Wells, Yuncong Li, and David Dinkins, and published by the Horticultural Sciences Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1276

Candidate Species for Florida Aquaculture: Gulf Killifish, Fundulus grandis

Male (left) and female (right) Gulf killifish, Fundulus grandis.

The Gulf killifish is a promising species for commercial aquaculture in Florida with the potential to help diversify the marine baitfish aquaculture industry in Florida and throughout the southeastern United States. Methods for culturing this species have improved in the past decade; this 6-page fact sheet describes the new methods and some strategies to give producers greater control of reproduction, larval growth, and survival. The publication provides the information producers need to make the most informed decision possible when considering Gulf killifish aquaculture. Written by Shane W. Ramee, Joshua T. Patterson, Cortney L. Ohs, and Matthew A. DiMaggio and published by the Program in Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, School of Forest Resources and Conservation.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fa190

Nitrogen Fertilizer Recommendations for Sugarcane Production for Sugar on Florida Sand Soils

Rosa Muchovej, assistant professor with the University of Florida's Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, takes notes on growth of sugarcane near Clewiston. While most sugarcane is now grown on the area's organic muck soils, Muchovej and other UF researchers are developing new management practices to grow cane on less desirable sandy soil, thereby minimizing the environmental impact of sugarcane farming on the Florida Everglades.
Sands used in sugarcane production in Florida have low levels of organic matter, silt, and clay, and they provide little N through mineralization of organic matter and possess a low capacity for N retention as a result. Because these soils are highly leachable, N must be managed well to ensure adequate nutrition for the crop as well as protection of groundwater. This new 4-page fact sheet is part of the Sugarcane Handbook, and it discusses sand soils used in sugarcane production, sugar yield response to nitrogen, and revised nitrogen recommendations. Written by J. Mabry McCray, Kelly T. Morgan, and Les Baucum, and published by the UF Agronomy Department, February 2016.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/sc101

Ten Common Conifers of the Tampa Bay Area

Sand Pine (Pinus clausa)

Conifers are cone-bearing trees often identified by their needles. In addition to their value as landscape trees and lumber and paper sources, they are popular around the holidays as Christmas trees.

This 6-page guide written by Andrew K. Koeser, Holly Finley, Gitta Hasing, Gary W. Knox, and Melissa H. Friedman and published by the Environmental Horticulture Department will assist you in identifying the 10 most common conifers that grow in the Tampa Bay area of Florida. It is an efficient resource for master gardeners, novice tree inventory crews, 4-H forestry teams, and others interested in basic conifer identification.

http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep508

Florida Consumer Preferences for Fruit-Producing Plant Attributes

pineapple

This 4-page report from the Food and Resource Economics Department and the UF/IFAS Mid-Florida Research and Education Center compares the effects of plant type, price, production method, and origin attributes on consumer preferences for fruit-producing plants. Authors Hayk Khachatryan and Alicia Rihn present the results of a survey of Florida plant consumers conducted in June and July of 2014 to rate their likelihood of purchasing plants with various attributes, reporting that production methods do indeed directly influence consumers’ preferences for fruit-producing plants. The article describes the implications for the environmental horticulture industry and provides suggestions for growers and retailers to more effectively market their plants.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe981

Monitoring Leaching Fraction for Irrigation Scheduling in Container Nurseries

Figure 1. Routine leaching fraction tests can help growers monitor and adjust irrigation rates to maximize water use efficiency in container nurseries.
Scheduling irrigation in container nurseries can be a daunting task for producers. There is a great risk of under- or over-watering. The leaching fraction (LF) test is a valuable tool for measuring the volume of container drainage collected during irrigation relative to the volume of water entering the container. With this test, producers can adjust their irrigation to maintain a low percentage of leaching. This four-page fact sheet explains how to perform the test, gives example calculations, and provides some suggestions on how to utilize LF testing when managing irrigation. Written by Jeff Million and Tom Yeager, and published by the Environmental Horticulture Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep529

Potato Vine Killing or Desiccation

Pick any vegetable crop - from lettuce and tomatoes to peppers and potatoes - chances are IFAS research is helping Florida farmers produce a superior product for consumers in todays copetitive marketplace.
Proper tuber maturity at harvest is an important factor in producing high-quality fresh-market potatoes. Tuber maturity is generally recognized as an important determinant of storage ability and cooking quality. Maturation can be artificially induced by killing the potato vines prior to harvest. This will benefit tuber appearance, limit tuber size, and improve tuber release from the vine. This four-page fact sheet describes the importance of tuber maturation, potato vine killing timing and available methods, and how to determine when to vine kill and when to harvest after vine kill. Written by Lincoln Zotarelli, Steven Sargent, Peter Dittmar, and Mildred Makani, and published by the Horticultural Sciences Department.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs181

Ten Common Flowering Trees of the Tampa Bay Area

EP505

Blooming trees serve as key focal points in the urban landscape. Florida’s flowering trees can be quite spectacular and leave you wondering, Wow, what tree is that?

This 7-page guide written by Gitta Hasing, Andrew K. Koeser, Gary W. Knox, and Melissa H. Friedman and published by the Environmental Horticulture Department will assist you in identifying the 10 most common flowering trees that grow in the Tampa Bay area of Florida. It is an efficient resource for master gardeners, novice tree inventory crews, 4-H forestry teams, and others interested in basic flowering tree identification.
edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep505


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