University of FloridaspacerSolutions for Your Life

New and Revised Publications RSS Icon

Programacion de Riego Basado en el Metodo de Evapotranspiracion Para Papaya (Carica papaya) en Florida

Fruiting papaya trees at the Tropical Research and Education Center in Homestead, FL. UF/IFAS Photo: Thomas Wright

La papaya es un importante cultivo frutícola que se cultiva en el sur de Florida con un área estimada de 356 acres. Este documento se centra en las técnicas de programación de riego basadas en ET para la papaya en las condiciones de Florida. Written by Haimanote K. Bayabil, Jonathan H. Crane, Kati W. Migliaccio, Yuncong Li, Fredy Ballen, and Sandra Guzmán, and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, November 2020.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ae547

Eastern Indigo Snake

Photo of snake's head viewed from above, grass visible under it.

Learn more about eastern indigo snakes!
The Wildlife of Florida Factsheet series was created to provide the public with a quick, accurate introduction to Florida's wildlife, including both native and invasive species. Authors Tyler Buckley and Raoul K. Boughton hope this 2-page quick guide and others in the series published by the UF/IFAS Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation will inspire readers to investigate wildlife in their own backyards and communities and understand the amazing biodiversity of wildlife in the state of Florida.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw475

Tomato Brown Rugose Fruit Virus (ToBRFV): A Potential Threat for Tomato Production in Florida

Freshly picked tomatoes.

Tobamoviruses are mechanically transmitted plant viruses that cause severe economic damage to vegetable and ornamental crops in Florida and worldwide. While certain tomato cultivars have genetic resistance to the most common tobamoviruses, no commercial tomato cultivars are resistant to tomato brown rugose fruit virus (ToBRFV), a recently described tobamovirus that also infects pepper and eggplant. It is currently unknown how ToBRFV may affect tomato production in Florida. This new 5-page publication of the UF/IFAS Plant Pathology Department describes symptoms of the virus, how it is different from other tobamoviruses, and how it is transmitted, as well as what to do if you think you have ToBRFV in your field. Written by Ozgur Batuman, Salih Yilmaz, Pamela Roberts, Eugene McAvoy, Samuel Hutton, Kishore Dey, and Scott Adkins.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pp360

El sapo de caņa o ?Bufo? (Rhinella marina) en Florida

close-up photo of male and female cane toads.

El sapo de caña (Rhinella marina), a veces conocido como el “bufo”, sapo gigante o marino, es nativo del extremo sur de Texas, México, América Central y la zona tropical de la América del Sur, pero está establecido en Florida. Los sapos de caña se introdujeron inicialmente en Florida como un método de control biológico de plagas en la década de 1930. Se suponía que los sapos comieran escarabajos que amenazaran el cultivo de la caña de azúcar, pero la población introducida no sobrevivió. This 7-page fact sheet written by S. A. Johnson, A. Wilson, and Armando J. Ubeda and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation is the Spanish translation of The Cane or “Bufo” Toad (Rhinella marina) in Florida.
https:edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw477

The Life of Lichen

Close-up photo of deer moss growing among dry leaves and grasses.

Lichen represent a fascinating combination of organisms working together to form some familiar and unfamiliar growths on a variety of substrates. This 6-page fact sheet written by James Stevenson, Lara B. Milligan, and Jennifer L. Gillett-Kaufman and published by the UF/IFAS Entomology and Nematology Department defines and explains these organisms.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/in1296

Biology and Management of Florida Betony (Stachys floridana) in Ornamental Plants in Landscape Planting Beds

Florida betony inflorescence. Credits: Chris Marble, UF/IFAS

Florida betony (Stachys floridana) is a perennial weed in Florida landscape planting beds, gardens, turfgrass, and agricultural production systems. This new 4-page article is written for green industry professionals and others to aid in the identification and management of Florida betony in and around ornamental plants in landscape planting beds. Written by Thomas Smith and Chris Marble, and published by the UF/IFAS Environmental Horticulture Department.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep597

Herbicide Resistance Management in Florida Tomato Production

Cherry tomatoes. Photo taken 05-09-16. Photo Credits: UF/IFAS Photo by Tyler Jones

Herbicide resistance was historically not a significant issue in most horticultural crops because few herbicides were applied. Close proximity of agronomic crops and the loss of methyl bromide has led to a gradual increase in herbicide inputs and the increased occurrence of herbicide-resistant weeds in tomato fields. Very few herbicides are registered for tomato, and resistance is a major concern. This new 11-page publication of the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department provides a definition of herbicide resistance, explains how it develops, and provides management recommendations for tomato growers. It was written for growers and Extension agents, but the information may be of interest to anyone concerned about herbicide resistance in vegetable and small fruit crops. Written by Shaun M. Sharpe, Nathan S. Boyd, Ramdas G. Kanissery, and Peter J. Dittmar.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1398

Facts about Wildlife Diseases: Raccoon-Borne Pathogens of Importance to Humans?The Raccoon Roundworm

Photo of a raccoon standing in shallow water in the daytime. It has spotted the photographer and is gazing at the camera.

Diseases carried by northern raccoons present significant health hazards to both people and pets. This 7-page fact sheet written by Caitlin Jarvis and Mathieu Basille and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation is part of a series addressing health hazards associated with raccoons. It describes the raccoon roundworm and the disease it causes, baylisascariasis, which normally causes little or no trouble to raccoons but in severe cases can make people and their pets very sick. Sick wild animals can act tame, but do not approach! Contact animal control or a wildlife rehabilitator if an animal seems to be behaving abnormally or if you suspect it is sick.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw480

Facts about Wildlife Diseases: Raccoon-Borne Pathogens of Importance to Humans?Parasites

A raccoon perched in a lichen-covered tree at night faces the camera. One forepaw is visible.
Diseases carried by northern raccoons present significant health hazards to both people and pets. This 7-page fact sheet written by Caitlin Jarvis and Mathieu Basille and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation is part of a series addressing health hazards associated with raccoons. It describes the most important internal and external parasites associated with raccoons. Sick wild animals can act tame, but do not approach! Contact animal control or a wildlife rehabilitator if an animal seems to be behaving abnormally or if you suspect it is sick.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw479

Facts about Wildlife Diseases: Raccoon-Borne Pathogens of Importance to Humans?Viruses and Bacteria

photo of a raccoon taken at night and spotlit by the flash.

Diseases carried by northern raccoons present significant health hazards to both people and pets. This 7-page fact sheet written by Caitlin Jarvis, Samantha M. Wisely, and Mathieu Basille and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation is part of a series addressing health hazards associated with raccoons. It describes rabies, canine distemper, feline distemper, canine parvovirus, salmonellosis, and several other raccoon-borne viral and bacterial diseases of concern to people and their pets. Sick wild animals can act tame, but do not approach! Contact animal control or a wildlife rehabilitator if an animal seems to be behaving abnormally or if you suspect it is sick.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw478

Leches a base de plantas: Coco

A tulip glass half full of coconut milk. Credit: Lincoln Zotarelli, UF/IFAS

La leche de coco es una de las muchas variedades de alternativas vegetales a la leche de vaca. Los factores que pueden llevar a los consumidores hacia alternativas a la leche no láctea incluyen la adherencia a una dieta vegana, la intolerancia a la lactosa, la alergia a la leche de vaca o simplemente la preferencia. El propósito de esta guía es informarle sobre el contenido de nutrientes de la leche de coco y sus posibles beneficios y riesgos para la salud.
This new 4-page article is the Spanish language version of FSHN20-49/FS411, Plant-Based Milks: Coconut, written by Celia Andreo, Daniela Rivero-Mendoza, and Wendy J Dahl, and published by the UF/IFAS Food Science and Human Nutrition Department.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fs421

The Road to Recovery: Building Physical and Emotional Trust when Engaging with Extension Clientele

The virus that causes COVID-19

Now is a crucial time for Extension professionals to engage with clientele. In both urban and rural communities, clients are facing a multitude of unprecedented challenges related to COVID-19. Many Extension professionals already have experience in emergency and disaster preparedness, response, and recovery that can be applied in the present context. However, we must rethink how we interact with and assist clientele to ensure their safety and our own. To do this, it is critical we understand that the pandemic has exacerbated emotional trauma and anxiety resulting in trust gaps. This new 4-page publication of the UF/IFAS Department of Agricultural Education and Communication aims to build Extension professionals? sensitivity to the needs and emotional strains that COVID-19 presents for clients, and the strategies needed for effective recovery. Written by Colby Silvert, Cody Gusto, and John Diaz.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc376

Smutgrass Control in Perennial Grass Pastures

Smutgrass infestations are common in bahiagrass pastures throughout Florida.

This 4-page document provides an overview of smutgrass biology, control, and general recommendations. Written by Brent Sellers, Neha Rana, José Luiz C. S. Dias, and Pratap Devkota, and published by the UF/IFAS Agronomy Department, revised October 2020.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/aa261

Chilli Thrips on Blueberries in Florida

Extreme close-up photo of a lemon-yellow adult female chilli thrips on a green leaf.

Chilli thrips, (Scirtothrips dorsalis Hood; Thysanoptera: Thripidae), is an economically important pest of vegetable, fruit, and ornamental crops throughout Asia, Africa, Oceania, the Caribbean, and some parts of South America and is an invasive pest in several US states. Chilli thrips were first observed in Florida in 1991. It was first recorded in blueberries in Hernando, Pasco and Sumter counties in July of 2008. This 4-page fact sheet written by Oscar E. Liburd, Babu R. Panthi, and Douglas A. Phillips and published by the UF/IFAS Entomology and Nematology Department discusses the life cycle of the chilli thrips, plant damage it causes, and management recommendations for chilli thrips in blueberries in Florida.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/in1298

How Are Our Future Agriculture and Natural Resources Projected under Varying Climate?

Storm rising over a farm.

This 8-page article explains how agriculture and natural resources may respond to projected future climate and how climate projections can be useful in developing management plans for the improved sustainability of Florida's agriculture and natural resources. It also aims to help increase the public awareness of climate change impacts on Florida and improve understanding of the connections among climate, agriculture, and natural resources. Written by Young Gu Her, Ashley Smyth, Zachary Brym, and Elias Bassil, and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, September 2020.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ae545

Anhidrosis in the Horse (Non-Sweaters)?What Do We Know?

A horse participating in a teaching demonstration at the Horse Teaching Unit. Photo taken 05-15-19.

This 3-page document provides an overview of anhidrosis in horses, including symptoms and management tips. Written by Laura Patterson-Rosa, Martha F. Mallicote, Robert J. MacKay, and Samantha A. Brooks, and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Animal Sciences, October 2020.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/an362

Online Sources for Sea Level Rise Education and Extension

Volunteers planting saltmeadow cord grass as part of a living shoreline restoration project. Photo taken 08-28-20.

The impacts of sea level rise on ecosystems and natural resources are a major concern in Florida, especially in low-lying coastal areas such as south Florida. Sea level rise can impact many aspects of Florida's economy, including urban development, agriculture, infrastructure, and natural areas. This 16-page document introduces, evaluates, and summarizes selected available online sources and tools to educate diverse stakeholders and concerned local residents on important aspects of sea level rise. Written by Young Gu Her, Ashley Smyth, Jiangxiao Qiu, Elias Bassil, Ulrich Stingl, and Laura Reynolds, and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, June 2020.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ae543

Do Millennials Have a Stronger Demand for Orange Juice?

close-up photo of an orange juice label reading 100% PURE FLORIDA ORANGE JUICE

Accounting for a quarter of the population in the United States, the millennial generation is believed to have stronger buying power than other generations. But does targeting orange juice marketing to millennials, and, in particular, millennial parents, reap rewards? This 4-page fact sheet written by Yan Heng, Ronald W. Ward, and Lisa A. House and published by the UF/IFAS Food and Resource Economics Department presents the results of a survey examining several generations and their impact on demand for orange juice to find out whether targeting this one is a wise marketing strategy.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe1089

Passion Fruit Problems in the Home Landscape

Flower morphology of passion fruit. Credits: Amir Rezazadeh, UF/IFAS

In Florida, purple and yellow passion fruit have been widely cultivated by homeowners for years, and south Florida?s subtropical climate allows for growing passion fruit year-round. Many factors affect longevity and productivity of passion fruit vine, including environmental stresses, pests, and disease. This new 5-page document is designed to help Master Gardeners and homeowners by answering commonly asked questions about passion fruit production problems. Written by Amir Rezazadeh, Mark Bailey, and Ali Sarkhosh, and published by the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs1397

Leaf Spot Diseases of Strawberry

Hands holding harvested strawberries. Photo taken 02-05-20. Photo Credits: UF/IFAS Photo by Cristina Carriz

Several different fungi and one bacterium cause leaf spot diseases of Florida strawberry. Symptoms caused by these pathogens are often similar, leading to confusion and misdiagnosis of the disease. To facilitate diagnosis, the most common leaf spots diseases of strawberry in Florida are described in this new 6-page article, written by Juliana S. Baggio, James C. Mertely, and Natalia A. Peres, and published by the UF/IFAS Plant Pathology Department.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pp359

What is EDIS?

EDIS is the Electronic Data Information Source of UF/IFAS Extension, a collection of information on topics relevant to you. More...

Author information
Additional IFAS Sites
Follow UF/IFAS on social media