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Gainesville's Urban Forest

Birds in the ’Burbs: Do migratory birds prefer urban forest fragments or residential yards?

UW492/WEC447by Ryan Buron, Mark Hostetler, and Michael AndreuMarch 3rd, 2022During migration, birds travel from their northern breeding grounds to their southern wintering grounds and vice versa. To understand which urban habitats are valuable for specific migratory species, we compared the diversity of migratory bird species that used urban forest fragments vs residential areas with tree canopy in Gainesville, Florida. Study results summarized in this fact sheet can help inform urban planners, developers, and homeowners about vegetation migratory birds use. Conservation of large, forested areas is important, but fragmented landscapes are not useless, and conserving urban forest fragments and trees in residential areas is also important for bird conservation.

Air Pollution Removal and Temperature Reduction by Gainesville's Urban Forest

FR278/FOR216 by Francisco Escobedo, Jennifer A. Seitz, Wayne Zipperer, and Basil IannoneJuly 28th, 2021The urban forest can help improve air quality by removing pollutants and by reducing air temperature through shading and transpiration, but tree maintenance-related pollution emissions can indirectly contribute to ozone formation and pollutants. This fact sheet presents the results of a study estimating air pollution removal by urban trees in Gainesville, Florida.

Carbon Dioxide Sequestration, Storage, and Offsets by Gainesville's Urban Forest

FR272/FOR210 by Francisco Escobedo, Jennifer A. Seitz, and Wayne ZippererMay 16th, 2022A UF/IFAS numbered Fact Sheet for Policy Makers audience(s).

The Effect of Gainesville's Urban Trees on Energy Use of Residential Buildings

FR273/FOR 211 by Francisco Escobedo, Jennifer A. Seitz, Wayne Zipperer, and Basil IannoneJuly 28th, 2021A city's trees reduce its energy use year round by shading buildings and providing evaporative cooling in summer and by blocking icy winter winds. This fact sheet presents the results of a study estimating urban tree heating and cooling effects on residential buildings in Gainesville, Florida, from 2006-2007.

Executive Summary of Gainesville's Urban Forest in 2016

FR417/FOR348 by Michael G. Andreu, Caroline A. Hament, David A. Fox, and Robert J. NorthropAugust 12th, 2019

Gainesville Florida's Urban Tree Cover

FR277/FOR 215 by Francisco Escobedo, Jennifer A. Seitz, Wayne Zipperer, and Basil IannoneAugust 23rd, 2021UF/IFAS Fact sheet.

Gainesville's Urban Forest Structure and Composition

FR276/FOR 214 by Francisco Escobedo, Jennifer A. Seitz, Wayne Zipperer, and Basil IannoneJuly 28th, 2021The urban forest is composed of a mix of native and non-native species introduced by people managing this forest and by residents. Because they usually contain non-native species, many urban forests often have greater species diversity than forests in the surrounding natural landscapes. This fact sheet overviews the composition and structure of the urban forest found in Gainesville, Florida.

The Structure and Composition of Gainesville's Urban Forest in 2016

FR413/FR344 by Michael G. Andreu, Caroline A. Hament, David A. Fox, and Robert J. NorthropFebruary 17th, 2022A UF/IFAS numbered peer reviewed Fact Sheet. in support of UF/IFAS Extension program: Natural resources operations and Invasive Species

Values and Ecosystem Services of Gainesville's Urban Forest in 2016

FR414/FR345 by Michael G. Andreu, Caroline A. Hament, David A. Fox, and Robert J. NorthropJuly 23rd, 2019

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