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Teach Aquaculture Curriculum

Teach Aquaculture Curriculum: Anatomy of a Fish

FA173/FA173 by Amber L. Garr, Cortney L. Ohs, Craig S. Kasper, R. Leroy Creswell, Frank A. Chapman, Brian E. Myers, Elisa J. Livengood, and Carlos V. MartinezApril 25th, 2018

Teach Aquaculture Curriculum: Chlorine—Friend or Foe?

FA171/FA171 by Carlos V. Martinez, Cortney L. Ohs, Brian E. Myers, Elisa J. Livengood, Craig S. Kasper, Amber L. Garr, R. Leroy Creswell, and Frank A. ChapmanDecember 16th, 2019

Teach Aquaculture Curriculum: Dancing with Brine Shrimp

FA176/FA176 by Elisa J. Livengood, Cortney L. Ohs, Amber L. Garr, R. Leroy Creswell, Carlos V. Martinez, Craig S. Kasper, Brian E. Myers, and Frank A. ChapmanApril 26th, 2018Brine shrimp live in and are harvested primarily from natural salt lakes and solar salt operations around the world. Two natural sources of brine shrimp in the United States are the Great Salt Lake in Utah and San Francisco Bay in California. Adult brine shrimp are also called "sea monkeys" and are used for entertainment or to feed aquarium fish. Brine shrimp can be used to observe, control, and manipulate a life cycle under laboratory conditions during a period of less than 2 weeks. They can be

Teach Aquaculture Curriculum: Fish-Eating Contest

FA169/FA169 by Amber L. Garr, Cortney L. Ohs, Brian E. Myers, Craig S. Kasper, R. Leroy Creswell, Frank A. Chapman, Carlos V. Martinez, and Elisa J. LivengoodDecember 16th, 2019

Teach Aquaculture Curriculum: How big is that pond?

FA170/FA170 by Cortney L. Ohs, Amber L. Garr, R. Leroy Creswell, Elisa J. Livengood, Brian E. Myers, Carlos V. Martinez, Frank A. Chapman, and Craig S. KasperDecember 16th, 2019

Teach Aquaculture Curriculum: Introduction

FA177/FA177 by Cortney L. Ohs, R. Leroy Creswell, Amber L. Garr, Carlos V. Martinez, Brian E. Myers, Elisa J. Livengood, Craig S. Kasper, and Frank A. ChapmanApril 19th, 2018

Teach Aquaculture Curriculum: Spawning and Rearing Bivalve Molluscs—Larval Culture

FA175/FA175 by R. Leroy Creswell, Cortney L. Ohs, Craig S. Kasper, Carlos V. Martinez, Elisa J. Livengood, Amber L. Garr, Frank A. Chapman, and Brian E. MyersApril 25th, 2018In this activity students will use an ocular micrometer to measure the length of bivalve larvae, monitor the density of larvae in their culture system, and understand production protocols used in bivalve hatcheries. This activity will take about 15 minutes per day for approximately two weeks; this is the amount of time it will take for larvae to develop from egg to metamorphosis (setting).

Teach Aquaculture Curriculum: Spawning and Rearing Bivalve Molluscs—Spawning

FA174/FA174 by R. Leroy Creswell, Cortney L. Ohs, Craig S. Kasper, Elisa J. Livengood, Amber L. Garr, Brian E. Myers, Carlos V. Martinez, and Frank A. ChapmanApril 25th, 2018

Teach Aquaculture Curriculum: What makes a good fish food?

FA172/FA172 by Craig S. Kasper, Cortney L. Ohs, Brian E. Myers, Frank A. Chapman, Amber L. Garr, R. Leroy Creswell, Carlos V. Martinez, and Elisa J. LivengoodApril 18th, 2018

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