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Biochars

Biochar, also known as black carbon, is a product derived from organic materials rich in carbon (C) and is found in soils in very stable solid forms, often as deposits. Biochars can persist for long periods of time in the soil at various depths, typically thousands of years. The most common example is charcoal, derived from wood. Similarly, the Terra Preta soils of the Amazon Basin are one of the more widely known examples of biochar. -- An Introduction to Biochars and Their Uses in Agriculture

Publications

An Introduction to Biochars and Their Uses in Agriculture

SS585/SL383 by Rao Mylavarapu, Vimala Nair, and Kelly MorganSeptember 20th, 2019

Biochar Effects on Weed Management

AG390/SS-AGR-386by Neeta Soni, Jason A. Ferrell, Pratap Devkota, and Michael J. MulvaneyJune 30th, 2021This publication provides an overview of the impact of biochar use as a soil amendment on weed management. Written by Neeta Soni, Jason A. Ferrell, Pratap Devkota, and Michael J. Mulvaney, and published by the UF/IFAS Agronomy Department, revised May 2021.

Producing Biochar Using a Custom Designed Top-Lit Updraft (TLUD) Gasifier

SS626/SL413 by Jehangir H. Bhadha, Stephen Jennewein, Julio Sanchez, and Timothy A. LangSeptember 2nd, 2021A UF/IFAS numbered Fact Sheet for Commercial audience(s). in support of UF/IFAS Extension program: Conservation practices and efficiency improvement

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