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Florida 4-H Dairy Record Book

Karen Hamilton, Chris Decubellis, Chris Holcomb, and Sarah Hensley

Dairy and Dairy Goat Project Record Book (4H DAR 01) is an animal sciences publication suggested for 4-H members age 8 and up. This record book is a tool to guide youth in keeping an accurate record of their expenses and other important records pertaining to dairy cattle or dairy goats.

In EDIS this publication is DLN 4H 054.

This publication is best viewed as a PDF.

Visit the 4-H Youth Development Curriculum website for more information on related project material.

Click Here to print or view the entire project.

Florida 4-H Dairy Record Book

 

Table 1. 

 

I hereby certify that, as the owner of this project, I have personally been responsible for the care of this (these) animal(s), kept records on this project, and completed this record book.

_____________________________________________________________________________

Member's Signature Date

I/We, the parent(s), certify that my/our child has completed this project and this record book.

______________________________________________________________________________

Parent/Guardian Signature Date

I certify that the above-named individual is an active member of the _______________________ 4-H Club in ____________________ County. I verify that this record book has been completed by the student and is an accurate representation of the project.

______________________________________________________________________________

4-H Club Leader Signature Date

_______________________________________________________________________________

4-H County Extension Agent Signature Date

General Information

Your 4-H Dairy Project

This project record will help you and others see what you have learned about your dairy project animal(s). It will also serve as a way to teach others how to develop an outstanding project.

Primary Objectives of the Dairy Project:

  • Become aware of the scope and economic significance of the dairy industry.

  • Acquire skills in dairy production through ownership and care of dairy animals.

  • Learn marketing, processing, distribution, and use of dairy products.

  • Learn and practice principles of cleanliness and sanitation as applied to the production and care of dairy products.

  • Learn the nutritive value of dairy products and promote their use.

  • Appreciate contributions and applications of scientific research to the dairy industry.

  • Develop sportsmanship, cooperation, decision-making, and public speaking skills through participation in demonstrations, tours, judging, and/or exhibits.

To find additional resources to help you with your project, visit http://www.4-h.org/resource-library/curriculum/.

The Dairy Cattle Skills for Life series is a set of three levels of project guides that are filled with activities and information that can help you increase your knowledge of dairy cattle. These include Cowabunga!, Mooving Ahead, and Rising to the Top.

Also visit https://extension.psu.edu/monitoring-dairy-heifer-growth for Monitoring Dairy Heifer Growth, an excellent publication from Penn State University.

The Dairy Goat Skills for Life series is a set of three levels of project guides that are filled with activities and information that can help you increase your knowledge of dairy goats. These include Getting Your Goat, Stepping Out, and Showing the Way.

***Note: Make additional copies of pages as you need them***

Individual Animal Identification

Breed:

Birthdate:

Tattoo:

Registration Number:

Ear Tag Number:

Date Acquired:

Name of Breeder or Previous Owner:

Address of Breeder or Previous Owner:

 

Table 2. 

Picture of Dairy Animal

 

Make copies of this page as necessary.

Pedigree

Enter the name and registration number. Make copies of this page as necessary.

 

 

 

 

Growth Record Summary

Fill this out monthly to keep track of your animal's growth; use growth charts (Appendix A) for the appropriate breed to compare your animal's breed recommendations.

 

Table 3. 

 

Dairy Heifer Growth Chart

Use this chart to keep track of your heifer's growth and compare to her breed average.

Use this information to make a decision on an appropriate time to breed your heifer

 

 

Progeny Record

Animal Inventory

 

Table 5. 

 

  • To calculate the Change in Value, subtract the Beginning Value from the Ending Value.

  • To calculate the Total Beginning Value, add all the numbers in the Beginning Value column.

  • To calculate the Total Ending Value, add all the numbers in the Ending Value column.

  • To calculate the Total Change in Value, add all the numbers in the Change in Value column.

  • Animals that are purchased during the project will be recorded as a non-feed expense.

  • The beginning inventory value will be blank on this page.

  • Enter the ending value for all animals in the project at the end of the year.

  • Note born, purchased, sold, or deceased animals in the Comments column.

Equipment Inventory

 

Table 6. 

 

To calculate the total, add all the values that correspond to that column.

Refer to Appendix C for information on Depreciation.

Veterinary and Health Expenses

To calculate the total, add all the values that correspond to the Costs column.

Breeding Record and Expenses

 

Table 8. 

 

Feed Record

 

Table 9. 

 

To calculate the total, add all the values that correspond to that column.

Ration Record

Refer to your feed label for the information to complete this page.

Milk or Milk Replacer

% Protein:

% Fat:

Main Ingredient:

Medicated (Yes or No):

Cost per Pound:

Feed (Concentrate Mix)

% Protein:

% Fat:

Main Ingredient:

Medicated (Yes or No):

Cost per Pound:

Juniors: Complete one Feed Records page for all animals by month. For cows kept at a dairy, write the exchange value of milk for feed.

Intermediates: Complete one Feed Records page per animal group (Calves, Heifers, Cows). For cows kept at a dairy, write the exchange value of milk for feed.

Seniors: Complete one Feed Records page per animal group (Calves, Heifers, Cows). For cows kept at a dairy, determine average feed values.

Weigh feed one day each month. Calculate pounds consumed and total value of feed consumed per month.

Refer to Appendix B to complete Feed Records.

Lactation Record

Animal Name or Number:

Registration or Ear Tag Number:

Breed:

Date of Birth:

Freshening Date:

What was Florida's average mailbox price for the most recent year (look up on the internet)? $

To calculate the total, add all the values that correspond to the Value of Milk column.

Make copies of this page as needed.

*Not required. Only fill in if information is available from the dairy.

Show Receipts and Expenses

 

Table 11. 

 

To calculate the total, add all the values that correspond to that column.

Non-Feed Expenses

 

Table 12. 

 

  1. To calculate the total, add all the values that correspond to the Value column.

  2. Include all expenses NOT already reported in another record. This should include animals purchased during the project year and other expendable items

Labor Record

 

Table 13. 

 

  • To calculate the total, add all the values of the row that corresponds to that month.

  • To calculate Annual Labor Hours, add all the values in the Total column.

  • Include an estimate of the time spent each month on each of the labor activities listed.

Animals Sold

 

Table 14. 

 

  • To calculate the Total Received, add all the values that correspond to the Amount Received column.

  • Animals sold should have a value of 0 on your ending inventory.

Other Income

 

Table 15. 

 

  • To calculate the Total Received, add all the values that correspond to the Amount Received column.

  • Record any money given to you to support your project by sponsors, parents, etc.

Financial Summary

Expenses

Beginning Animal Inventory:

Beginning Equipment Inventory:

Veterinary and Health Costs:

Breeding Costs:

Feed Costs for ALL Animals:

Show Expenses:

Non-Feed Expenses:

Total Expenses:

Receipts

Ending Animal Inventory:

Ending Equipment Inventory:

Show Receipts:

Value of Milk Produced:

Value of Animals Sold:

Other Income:

Total Receipts:

Profit/Loss:

Total Receipts - Total Expenses =

Project Activities

 

Table 16. 

 

  • List the demonstrations, talks, exhibits, newspaper articles, tours, workshops, camps, judging events, and field trips that were a part of your dairy project experience.

  • Level: Club, County, District, State, Regional, or National

Citizenship and Community Service

 

Table 17. 

 

  • List your citizenship and community service accomplishments.

  • Level: Club, County, District, State, Regional, or National.

Leadership Accomplishments

 

Table 18. 

 

  • Enter any leadership responsibilities you had during this project (e.g., committee assignments, officer positions, leading group activities, etc.)

  • Level: Club, County, District, State, Regional, or National.

What skills and knowledge have you gained from this project?

  • Be specific when listing skills and knowledge gained.

  • For example, instead of writing "sportsmanship," write "learned types of questions judges ask during sportsmanship and researched answers."

Project Pictures

Pictures should show the beginning and end of your project as well as skills you learned. There should be five to eight pictures. Include a caption with each photo. The caption should tell a story and explain what you are doing and why you are doing the things shown in the photo. Pay attention to spelling and grammar.

Project Story

Write an essay about your dairy project experience.

Juniors write a minimum of 100 words. Intermediates write a minimum of 150 words. Seniors write a minimum of 250 words.

Ideas to help you:

  • What have you learned?

  • What safety practices have you used in your project?

  • How have you managed your project?

  • What can you do to improve your project next year?

  • What did you do to make the best better?

  • What goals did you have and how did you accomplish them?

  • What workshops or clinics have you attended and what did you learn?

  • How can the experiences you have had in this project help you in the future?

Appendix A: Growth Charts

 

Table 19. 

Suggested Weights and Heights for Breeding Age Heifers

 

Chart from "Monitoring Dairy Heifer Growth" Penn State College of Agricultural Sciences.

 

Table 20. 

Range of Recommended Jersey Heifer Weights and Height

 

Chart from "Monitoring Dairy Heifer Growth" Penn State College of Agricultural Sciences.

 

Table 21. 

Range of Recommended Holstein Heifer Weights and Heights

 

Chart from "Monitoring Dairy Heifer Growth" Penn State College of Agricultural Sciences.

 

Table 22. 

Range of Recommended Guernsey Heifer Weights and Heights

 

Chart from "Monitoring Dairy Heifer Growth" Penn State College of Agricultural Sciences.

 

Table 23. 

Range of Recommended Ayrshire Heifer Weights and Heights

 

Chart from "Monitoring Dairy Heifer Growth" Penn State College of Agricultural Sciences.

 

Table 24. 

Range of Recommended Brown Swiss Heifer Weights and Heights

 

Chart from "Monitoring Dairy Heifer Growth" Penn State College of Agricultural Sciences.

 

Table 25. 

Range of Recommended Milking Shorthorn Heifer Weights and Heights

 

Chart from "Monitoring Dairy Heifer Growth" Penn State College of Agricultural Sciences.

Appendix B: Feed Records

Use the following information to help you complete your Feed Records page.

POUNDS OF FEED: This value represents the pounds of feed consumed by one animal on the date the feed was weighed, multiplied by the number of days in the month.

Example: 5 pounds of concentrate mix were weighed and consumed on March 5.

5 pounds x 31 days = 155 pounds of concentrate consumed in March

VALUE OF FEED: This figure represents the average total value of pounds of feed consumed per animal per month.

Example: If the feed cost $14.00/50 pounds, and you fed 155 pounds, you would calculate the value of the feed as follows.

($14.00 x 155 lbs.)/50 lbs. = $43.40

OR

($14.00/50 lbs.) = $0.28/lb. x 155 lbs. = $43.40

DATE FEED WEIGHED: Select a day each month to weigh the pounds of the different types of feed consumed by your animal(s) and record this date in the appropriate column.

YEAR'S TOTAL FEED EXPENSE: This figure represents the sum of the columns of pounds of feed consumed per month and the value of the feed consumed per month.

PRICE USED PER POUND OF FEED: This figure should represent the price per pound of feed used when calculating the value of each feed ingredient.

Example: If feed costs $14.00/50 lbs., the cost is $0.28/lb.

Appendix C: Depreciation

Depreciation is the annual reduction in value of an item due to use, wear, age, or a combination of these factors. For an item to be depreciable, it must be owned, have a useful life greater than one year, have a finite and determinable life, and have productive use in the business. In agriculture, examples of depreciable items are buildings, vehicles, machinery, equipment, fences, other land improvements, and breeding livestock. Items that are not depreciable are real estate, market livestock, crop inventories, and supplies.

Calculating depreciation is a simple process; however, it becomes complicated because items depreciate at different rates depending on use, condition, and other factors.

For Juniors

When calculating depreciation, you will use a 10% per year depreciation of the original purchase cost for the items you will still have at the end of the project. This includes items you had at the beginning of the project as well as items purchased during the current calendar year.

Example: If you purchased a grooming chute for $800.00, the value of that chute would be 10% less at the end of the year.

$800.00 x 0.1 = $80.00

The beginning value is $800.00 and the ending value is $720.00.

$800.00 – $80.00 = $720.00

For each year you own this grooming chute, it will depreciate by $80.00.

For Intermediates and Seniors

There are three common methods of depreciation: straight line, declining balance, and sum-of-year's digits. For your record book purposes, you will use straight line depreciation. This method gives you a constant depreciation value for each year. The formula is:

(Original Cost - Salvage Value)/Useful Life

Some terms to know:

Original Cost: The price paid for the item.

Salvage Value: Expected market value of the item at the end of 5 years.

Useful Life: Number of years the item is expected to be used.

What is an item's useful life?

5 years: Vehicles, purchased breeding cattle, computers

7 years: Most farm machinery and equipment, fences

10 years: Single-purpose structures

20 years: General purpose buildings

Example: If you purchased a grooming chute for $800.00 with a salvage value of $400.00 and a useful life of 7 years, you would calculate the depreciation as follows.

($800.00 – $400.00)/7 years = $57.14/year

With straight line depreciation the annual depreciation for the grooming chute would be $57.14 each year.

Tables

Table 4. 
Table 7. 
Table 10. 
 

Publication #4HDAR01

Date: 12/11/2018

RELATED TOPICS

Curriculum
4-H/Youth

About this Publication

This document is 4HDAR01, one of a series of the 4-H Youth Development, UF/IFAS Extension. Original publication date November 1999. Revised October 2018. Visit the EDIS website at https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu for the currently supported version of this publication.

About the Authors

Karen Hamilton, volunteer; Chris Decubellis, SSA.; Chris Holcomb, volunteer; and Sarah Hensley, SSA; UF/IFAS Extension 4-H Youth Development Program, Gainesville, FL 32611.

Contacts

  • Christopher DeCubellis
  • Sarah Hensley