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RECENT & REVISED PUBLICATIONS

The Redbay Ambrosia Beetle and Laurel Wilt

thumbnail for publication: The Redbay Ambrosia Beetle and Laurel Wilt

FR475/FOR404by Yiyi Dong, Jiri Hulcr, Daniel Carrillo, and Xavier MartiniMay 23, 2024The redbay ambrosia beetle, harmless in its native Asia, has become a formidable pest since its introduction to the United States in 2002. The beetle spreads the fungus Harringtonia lauricola, a lethal pathogen of North American Lauraceae trees, including avocados. The fungus infection triggers a rapid onset of laurel wilt disease, which has nearly eliminated laurel trees across the southeastern United States within a few years. The beetle has spread across nearly 300 counties in the Southeast, facilitated by trade in wood products. Effective control in natural environments remains an unresolved challenge; in avocado groves, infected trees must be removed and destroyed. Introduction of X. glabratus into Mexico, California, Central America, or South America, regions with substantial avocado industries and diverse native Lauraceae species, would be disastrous. International cooperation is necessary to address this threat.Critical Issue: 1. Agricultural and Horticultural Enterprises

Redlegged Ham Beetle, Copra Beetle Necrobia rufipes (De Geer, 1775) (Insecta: Coleoptera: Cleridae: Korynetinae)

thumbnail for publication: Redlegged Ham Beetle, Copra Beetle Necrobia rufipes (De Geer, 1775) (Insecta: Coleoptera: Cleridae: Korynetinae)

IN1426/EENY-811by Ian Williams and Michael ScharfMay 23, 2024The redlegged ham beetle (Necrobia rufipes) is a predaceous beetle that feeds on a variety of decaying organic matter, especially matter with high protein and fat content such as dead vertebrate animals, and some of plant origin, such as copra, nuts, and palm kernels. The redlegged ham beetle is of economic importance as a pest of stored products and has relevance to forensic entomology. Other common names include the ham beetle, the copra beetle or bug, and the “paper worm.”Critical Issue: 3. Natural Resources and Environmental Quality

How to Build a Blackberry Trellis System: A Complete Guide

thumbnail for publication: How to Build a Blackberry Trellis System: A Complete Guide

HS1482/HS1482by Muhammad A. Shahid, Shahid Iqbal, and Ali SarkhoshMay 23, 2024Blackberry (Rubus spp.) is a deciduous fruit crop. The fruit are usually small, round, and dark purple to black. Blackberry fruit is comprised of multiple drupelets that cluster together to form a berry, which has a glossy appearance when matured. Blackberries have a complex flavor profile that blends sweetness and acidity, and taste may vary depending on the variety and maturity stage. They are rich in nutrients, vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. Blackberries are best grown in sub-tropical to temperate climates. Blackberry is a new emerging fruit crop in Florida, where they are harvested in May-June. There are several varieties, some of which are native to Florida. This publication aims to provide a general overview of the importance of trellis, different types of trellis, and their installation in blackberry production for county and state Extension faculty, growers, homeowners, and students interested in growing blackberries in Florida.Critical Issue: 1. Agricultural and Horticultural Enterprises

Florida Plant Disease Management Guide: Guava (Psidium guajava)

thumbnail for publication: Florida Plant Disease Management Guide: Guava (Psidium guajava)

PG133/PP-232by Romina Gazis, Jonathan Crane, and Jeff WasielewskiMay 22, 2024Guava is a popular subtropical fruit tree grown commercially in south Florida. Production is affected by multiple diseases of different origin. This guide provides information about the most common diseases, including disease biology and management. Written by Romina Gazis, Jonathan Crane, and Jeff Wasielewski, and published by the UF/IFAS Plant Pathology Department, revised April 2024.Critical Issue: 1. Agricultural and Horticultural Enterprises

Encouraging Residents to Request Wildlife-Friendly Landscape Maintenance from Their Chosen Professionals: A Stages of Change Approach for Extension and Other Practitioners

thumbnail for publication: Encouraging Residents to Request Wildlife-Friendly Landscape Maintenance from Their Chosen Professionals: A Stages of Change Approach for Extension and Other Practitioners

WC456/AEC795by Laura A. Warner, Dharmendra Kalauni, John M. Diaz, Emily Marois, Adam Dale, and Jaret DanielsMay 22, 2024This publication explains Florida residents’ current involvement in requesting wildlife-friendly landscape maintenance (WFLM) and the perceived barriers and motivators associated with this behavior using the concept of stages of change. Written by Laura A. Warner, Dharmendra Kalauni, John M. Diaz, Emily Marois, Adam Dale, and Jaret Daniels, and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Agricultural Education and Communication, April 2024.Critical Issue: 3. Natural Resources and Environmental Quality

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