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Publication #CG101

2020–2021 Florida Citrus Production Guide1

Lauren M. Diepenbrock, Megan M. Dewdney, and Tripti Vashisth, eds.2

This is the 2020–2021 edition of the Florida Citrus Production Guide. The complete contents of this guide may be found at https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pdffiles/CG/CG10100.pdf, with links to each chapter in the Table of Contents below.

Figure 1. 

The cover of the 2020–2021 Florida Citrus Production Guide.


Credit:

Tracy Bryant


[Click thumbnail to enlarge.]

Table of Contents

General Information

1. Introduction

2. Useful Telephone Numbers

3. Fresh Fruit Pesticide Residue Limits

4. Pesticide Resistance Management

5. Pesticide Application Technology

6. Best Management Practices for Soil-Applied Agricultural Chemicals

7. Interpreting PPE Statements on Pesticide Labels

8. Quick Reference Guide to the Worker Protection Standard (WPS) as Revised in 2015

9. Food Safety Requirements and Considerations for the Florida Citrus Grower

10. Crop Insurance Policies Available to Citrus Growers

11. Useful Websites and Mobile Apps

Horticultural Practices

12. Rootstock and Scion Selection

13. Planting New Citrus Groves in Florida in the Era of Citrus Greening

14. Grove Planning and Establishment

15. Irrigation Management of Citrus Trees

16. Nutrition Management for Citrus Trees

17. Fertilizer Application Methods

18. Root Health Management

19. Canopy Management

20. Plant Growth Regulators

21. Citrus Cold Protection

22. Citrus Under Protective Screen (CUPS) Production Systems

Mites, Insects, and Nematodes

23. Asian Citrus Psyllid

24. Citrus Leafminer

25. Rust Mites, Spider Mites, and Other Phytophagous Mites

26. Soft-Bodied Insects Attacking Foliage and Fruit

27. Plant Bugs, Chewing Insect Pests, Caribbean Fruit Fly, and Thrips

28. Citrus Root Weevils

29. Nematodes

Diseases

30. Huanglongbing (Citrus Greening)

31. Citrus Canker

32. Phytophthora Foot Rot, Crown Rot, and Root Rot

33. Brown Rot of Fruit

34. Greasy Spot

35. Melanose

36. Citrus Black Spot

37. Citrus Scab

38. Alternaria Brown Spot

39. Postbloom Fruit Drop

40. Exocortis, Cachexia, and Other Viroids

41. Blight

42. Tristeza Decline

43. Decay Control of Florida Fresh Citrus

Weeds

44. Weeds

Pesticides

45. Pesticides Registered for Use on Florida Citrus

Footnotes

1.

This document is CG101, one of a series of the Horticultural Sciences Department, UF/IFAS Extension. Original publication date August 2020. Visit the EDIS website at https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu for the currently supported version of this publication.

2.

Lauren M. Diepenbrock, assistant professor, Entomology and Nematology Department; Megan M. Dewdney, associate professor, Plant Pathology Department; and Tripti Vashisth, assistant professor, Horticultural Sciences Department; UF/IFAS Citrus Research and Education Center, Lake Alfred, FL 33850.

Use pesticides safely. Read and follow directions on the manufacturer's label. All chemicals should be used in accordance with directions on the manufacturer's label. The use of trade names in this publication is solely for the purpose of providing specific information. UF/IFAS does not guarantee or warranty the products named, and references to them in this publication do not signify our approval to the exclusion of other products of suitable composition.


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. For more information on obtaining other UF/IFAS Extension publications, contact your county's UF/IFAS Extension office.

U.S. Department of Agriculture, UF/IFAS Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A & M University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating. Nick T. Place, dean for UF/IFAS Extension.