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Gulf Coast REC

UF/IFAS Gulf Coast Research and Education Center is located at
14625 CR 672, Wimauma, FL33598
. http://gcrec.ifas.ufl.edu/

Editorial Team

RECENT & REVISED PUBLICATIONS

Plant-Parasitic Nematodes Associated with Asian Vegetables in Florida

IN1378/ENY-2086by Hung X. Bui and Johan A. DesaegerDecember 1st, 2022Root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.) are one of the main soilborne pathogens in Florida and cause considerable damage to many vegetables. Asian vegetables are important specialty crops in Florida, but no information is available on their hosts status to plant-parasitic nematodes, in particular to Meloidogyne spp. Therefore, we conducted a survey to learn what Asian vegetables are grown in Florida, the plant-parasitic nematodes associated with these crops, and the damage these nematodes could potentially cause to Asian vegetables.Critical Issue: Agricultural and Food Systems

Understanding Insecticide Modes of Action and Resistance Management in Florida Horticulture

IN1379/DNY-2087by Hugh Smith, Adam Dale, and Julien BeuzelinNovember 28th, 2022This publication is designed to help UF/IFAS Extension agents and members of the public understand insecticide modes of action and resistance management as they pertain to vegetables, field crops, turf, and ornamental plants.Critical Issue: Agricultural and Food Systems

Using Supplemental Lighting to Grow Hemp in Florida

HS1452/HS1452by J. Desaeger, J. Coburn, and S. AgeharaOctober 26th, 2022With the removal of hemp from the controlled substances list, hemp is now one of the emerging crops in Florida. There is limited information on how to grow this crop in Florida. Like hops, hemp is another recently introduced crop in the state, with one of the major yield-limiting factors of premature flowering induced by inadequate day length. This article provides guidelines for hemp growers in Florida on the use of supplemental lighting to control flowering and improve growth of hemp under Florida’s environmental conditions. Written by Johan Desaeger, Jacqueline Coburn, and Shinsuke Agehara, and published by the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department; 4 pp.Critical Issue: Agricultural and Food Systems

Improving Strawberry Varieties by Somaclonal Variation

HS1448/HS1448by Cheol-Min Yoo, Cheryl Dalid, Catalina Moyer, Vance Whitaker, and Seonghee LeeOctober 2nd, 2022Somaclonal variation is a breeding method utilizing natural genetic variation induced by a tissue culture process instead of by hybridization. This offers an alternative to mutation breeding for the introduction of new genetic variations in existing strawberry varieties. The main purpose of this new 5-page publication of the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department is to share the potential of this technique with plant breeders in the public and private industries. The secondary purpose is to educate the industry and the public on the scientific background of somaclonal variation. Written by Cheol-Min Yoo, Cheryl Dalid, Catalina Moyer, Vance Whitaker, and Seonghee Lee.Critical Issue: Agricultural and Food Systems

Guía de Poda Postcosecha para Lúpulos en Florida

HS1450/HS1439sby Mariel Gallardo, Shinsuke Agehara, Christopher DelCastillo, y Jack Rechcigl; traducido por Mariel GallardoSeptember 18th, 2022Este artículo explica por qué, cuándo y cómo podar el lúpulo en Florida. Además, es parte de una serie que examina los desafíos y oportunidades de la producción de lúpulo en Florida basada en la investigación en el Centro de Investigación y Educación de la Costa del Golfo UF/IFAS (UF/IFAS GCREC). A translation of HS1439, Postharvest Pruning Guide for Hops in Florida; written by Mariel Gallardo, Shinsuke Agehara, Christopher DelCastillo, and Jack Rechcigl; translated by Mariel Gallardo; published by the UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Department; 3 pp.Critical Issue: Agricultural and Food Systems