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Sea Grant

Description

The Florida Sea Grant College Program supports research and education activities that help Florida's shoreline communities, industries and citizens wisely use the state's coastal and marine resources.
Source: Florida Sea Grant Marine Extension

Editorial Team

  • Maia McGuire - Editor, Chair, Approver
  • Susan Gildersleeve - ICS Editor

RECENT & REVISED PUBLICATIONS

Ecosystem Services Provided by Living Shorelines

Critical Issue: Natural Resources and Environment

The purpose of this new 6-page document is to explain the types of ecosystem services provided by different types of living shorelines and how to quantify these values. The target audience for this document is local governments and municipalities that make decisions about developing, conserving, and restoring living shorelines; state management agencies that oversee broader scale habitat management; and finally, homeowners who will be immediately affected by any of these decisions. Written by Ashley R. Smyth, Laura K. Reynolds, Savanna C. Barry, Natalie C. Stephens, Joshua T. Patterson, and Edward V. Camp and published by the UF/IFAS Department of Soil, Water, and Ecosystem Sciences.
Released On: 05-30-2022

Artificial Reefs in Florida 101 – effects on fish: Part 2 of an Artificial Reef series

Critical Issue: Natural Resources and Environment

Increasingly, coastal managers are placing artificial reefs in marine waters. These long-lasting habitat alterations have measurable effects on fish, fishers, divers, fisheries, and marine social ecological systems. Understanding how artificial reefs function is necessary to make good decisions about future artificial reefs. Scientific research on many aspects of artificial reefs is not always summarized and explained. In response to this need, we designed a 4-part series called Artificial Reefs 101. This publication, part 2 of the Artificial Reefs series, explains how artificial reefs affect fish populations. It will help the interested public understand more about the ecological effects of artificial reefs and provide detailed information to stakeholders including management agencies, local governments, artificial reef manufacturers, and Extension agents, to allow for better-informed decisions about building and managing artificial reefs.
Released On: 05-12-2022

Ecological Influences on Coastal Finfish Recruitment

Critical Issue: Natural Resources and Environment

Florida is experiencing many human and climate-related changes to the aquatic environment that can affect fish. Lost or altered habitat, for instance, can lead to changes in fish populations that may impact survival, growth, or recruitment of those populations. Recruitment influences how many adult fish are later available for spawning and continuing the population. Understanding recruitment and how it is affected by ecological influences is important for considering the potential effects of ongoing climate change, as well as restoration and management of water quality and habitat. This publication provides background information useful to anyone interested in understanding more about factors affecting fish populations and should be especially useful to Extension agents and management agency personnel who would like an overview of these topics before engaging with stakeholders.
Released On: 05-05-2022

Repensando el papel del nitrógeno y fósforo en la eutrofización de los ecosistemas acuáticos

Critical Issue: Water Quality and Conservation

Históricamente, las agencias ambientales han buscado mejorar la calidad del agua de los lagos y ríos de agua dulce mediante el manejo de un solo nutriente. El fósforo era el nutriente principal de preocupación en los sistemas de agua dulce y el nitrógeno estaba regulado en los sistemas costeros y estuarios. Investigaciones recientes indican que debemos reducir tanto el fósforo como el nitrógeno para revertir los síntomas de eutrofización en todos los sistemas acuáticos. This new 5-page publication of the UF/IFAS Department of Soil and Water Sciences, written by H. Dail Laughinghouse IV, Ashley Smyth, Karl Havens, and Thomas Frazer, is a translation of SGEF190/SG118, "Rethinking the Role of Nitrogen and Phosphorus in the Eutrophication of Aquatic Ecosystems."
Released On: 04-25-2022

Artificial Reefs in Florida 101 – why are they built? Part 1 of an Artificial Reef series

Critical Issue: Natural Resources and Environment

Increasingly, coastal managers are placing artificial reefs in marine waters. These long-lasting habitat alterations have measurable effects on fish, fishers, divers, fisheries, and marine social ecological systems. Understanding how artificial reefs function is necessary to make good decisions about future artificial reefs. Scientific research on many aspects of artificial reefs is not always summarized and explained. In response to this need, we designed a 4-part series called Artificial Reefs 101. This publication, Part 1 of the Artificial Reefs 101 series, explains why artificial reefs are built. It defines what artificial reefs are and explains why people build and deploy artificial reefs. It should help the interested public understand how artificial reefs affect marine resources, and provide a background and baseline of information for decision-makers such as local officials, management agency personnel, and Extension agents.
Released On: 04-04-2022